Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity FAQ/Walkthrough

Table of Contents

  1. Donations
  2. Introduction
  3. Pre-Credits Walkthrough
    1. Format (READ!)
    2. Welcome to Paradise!
    3. Expanding Paradise!
    4. New Allies, New Dreams!
    5. The Great Expedition
    6. Can Fate Be Changed?
    7. Kyurem and the Bittercold
  4. Post-Credits Walkthrough
    1. A Minor Note To Read
    2. Resurrection?
    3. The Plot Ends
  5. Dungeon Index
  6. Magnagate Dungeons
    1. Introduction
    2. Challenging Cavern
    3. Glinting Cavern
    4. Healing Maze
    5. Joyous Cavern
    6. Marvel Cavern
    7. Mystical Maze
    8. Peculiar Cavern
    9. Primitive Maze
    10. Shining Maze
    11. Treasure Cavern
  7. DLC Dungeons
    1. Release Data
    2. Ivy Park
    3. Pika Land
    4. PokéForest
    5. Scalchop Beach
    6. Skill - Treasure
    7. Training Mountain
  8. Paradise Minigames
    1. Introduction
    2. Beartic Slide
    3. Sunken Treasure
  9. Hunting the Legends!
    1. Introduction
    2. Automatic Recruits
    3. Random Finds
    4. Royal-Rank Missions
    5. Special Cameos
  10. Team Skills
  11. Items Listings
    1. Berries
    2. Seeds
    3. Other Food Items
    4. Glasses, Ribbons, Etc.
    5. Devices
    6. Flags
    7. Orbs
    8. Throwable Weaponry
    9. Vitamins
    10. Evolution Items
    11. TMs/HMs
    12. Pokémon Gifts
    13. Miscellaneous Items
  12. Pokémon Paradise Stores
    1. Introduction
    2. Types of Land
    3. Facility Painting
    4. Field Painting
    5. General Stores
    6. Seed/Berry Fields
    7. Type Dojos
    8. Miscellaneous Areas
  13. Pokémon Details
    1. Section Format (READ!)
    2. Amoonguss
    3. Archen
    4. Archeops
    5. Audino
    6. Axew
    7. Azumarill
    8. Azurill
    9. Bagon
    10. Beartic
    11. Bisharp
    12. Blitzle
    13. Boldore
    14. Bouffalant
    15. Braviary
    16. Carracosta
    17. Chandelure
    18. Cinccino
    19. Cobalion
    20. Cofagrigus
    21. Conkeldurr
    22. Cottonee
    23. Cranidos
    24. Croagunk
    25. Crustle
    26. Cryogonal
    27. Cubchoo
    28. Deino
    29. Dewott
    30. Drilbur
    31. Druddigon
    32. Ducklett
    33. Dunsparce
    34. Dwebble
    35. Eevee
    36. Emboar
    37. Emolga
    38. Espeon
    39. Excadrill
    40. Flareon
    41. Foongus
    42. Fraxure
    43. Galvantula
    44. Garbodor
    45. Gigalith
    46. Glaceon
    47. Glameow
    48. Golett
    49. Golurk
    50. Gothita
    51. Gothitelle
    52. Gothorita
    53. Gurdurr
    54. Haxorus
    55. Herdier
    56. Ho-Oh
    57. Hydreigon
    58. Jolteon
    59. Joltik
    60. Keldeo
    61. Klang
    62. Klink
    63. Klinklang
    64. Krokorok
    65. Krookodile
    66. Kyurem
    67. Lampent
    68. Landorus
    69. Larvesta
    70. Leafeon
    71. Leavanny
    72. Lilligant
    73. Lillipup
    74. Litwick
    75. Lugia
    76. Mamoswine
    77. Mandibuzz
    78. Marill
    79. Meloetta
    80. Mienfoo
    81. Mienshao
    82. Minccino
    83. Munna
    84. Musharna
    85. Oshawott
    86. Palpitoad
    87. Panpour
    88. Pansage
    89. Pansear
    90. Patrat
    91. Pawniard
    92. Pelipper
    93. Petilil
    94. Pichu
    95. Pignite
    96. Pikachu
    97. Piloswine
    98. Purugly
    99. Quagsire
    100. Raichu
    101. Rampardos
    102. Reshiram
    103. Roggenrola
    104. Rufflet
    105. Salamence
    106. Samurott
    107. Sandile
    108. Scolipede
    109. Scrafty
    110. Scraggy
    111. Seismitoad
    112. Serperior
    113. Servine
    114. Sewaddle
    115. Shelgon
    116. Simipour
    117. Simisage
    118. Simisear
    119. Snivy
    120. Stoutland
    121. Swadloon
    122. Swanna
    123. Swinub
    124. Swoobat
    125. Tepig
    126. Terrakion
    127. Thundurus
    128. Timburr
    129. Tirtouga
    130. Tornadus
    131. Toxicroak
    132. Trubbish
    133. Tympole
    134. Umbreon
    135. Vaporeon
    136. Venipede
    137. Virizion
    138. Volcarona
    139. Vullaby
    140. Watchog
    141. Whimsicott
    142. Whirlipede
    143. Wingull
    144. Woobat
    145. Wooper
    146. Yamask
    147. Zebstrika
    148. Zekrom
    149. Zoroark
    150. Zorua
    151. Zweilous
  14. Pokémon Paradise Ranks
  15. Passwords
    1. Introduction
    2. U.S. Version
    3. Japananse Version
  16. Credits
  17. Version History
  18. Legalities

                    ____       _                              
                   |  _ \ ___ | | _____ _ __ ___   ___  _ __  
                   | |_) / _ \| |/ / _ \ '_ ` _ \ / _ \| '_ \ 
                   |  __/ (_) |   <  __/ | | | | | (_) | | | |
                   |_|   \___/|_|\_\___|_| |_| |_|\___/|_| |_|
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|  \/  |_   _ ___| |_  ___ _ __ _   _   |  _ \ _   _ _ __   __ _  ___  ___  _ __
| |\/| | | | / __|  _|/ _ \ '__| | | |  | | | | | | | '_ \ / _` |/ _ \/ _ \| '_ \
| |  | | |_| \__ \ |_|  __/ |  | |_| |  | |_| | |_| | | | | (_| |  __/ (_) | | | |
|_|  |_|\__, |___/\__|\___|_|   \__, |  |____/ \__,_|_| |_|\__, |\___|\___/|_| |_|
        |___/                   |___/                      |___/
   ____       _               _            _____        __ _       _ _
  / ___| __ _| |_  _______   | |_  ___    |_   _|_ __  / _|_)_ __ (_| |_ _   _
 | |  _ / _` |  _|/ _ / __|  |  _|/ _ \     | | | '_ \| |_| | '_ \| |  _| | | |
 | |_| | (_| | |_|  __\__ \  | |_| (_) |   _| |_| | | |  _| | | | | | |_| |_| |
  \____|\__,_|\__|\___|___/   \__|\___/   |_____|_| |_|_| |_|_| |_|_|\__|\__, |
                                                                         |___/
 
 

  • Game: Pokémon Mystery Dungeon 3: Gates to Infinity
  • Consoles: Nintendo 3DS
  • File Type: Formatted FAQ/Walkthrough
  • Author: KeyBlade999 (a.k.a. Daniel Chaviers)
  • Version: v1.01
  • Time of Update: 12:56 AM 4/1/2013
  • File Size: 611 KB

 
 
 

Donations

While I do write all of my guides for free, it does take a lot of time and effort to put them together. If you're feeling generous and want to show your appreciation, I am gladly accepting donations. I don't know exactly what the donations will be used for, but just know that you would definitely be helping me make more quality FAQs! Even the smallest donation amounts are appreciated, and they are a great way to say how much you appreciate the work I do. If you do decide you'd like to donate, please send the donations through PayPal at the e-mail address listed below. Thank you so very much for at least considering this!!
 
 
Donation/Contact E-Mail

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Introduction

Welcome to my most recent FAQ/Walkthrough for the Nintendo 3DS, and my first for this console in the HTML-esque format of GameFAQs. This FAQ will cover my most recent acquisition - Pokémon Mystery Dungeon 3: Gates to Infinity.

This game is actually the fourth entry in its series, preceeded by Red/Blue Rescue Teams on the GameBoy Advance, and by Explorers of Time/Darkness/Sky on the Nintendo DS. The true third entry consisted of the Adventure Squad games released for the Nintendo Wii, but only via WiiWare download, and only in Japan, leading this one - Gates to Infinity - being the more commonly-named PMD3. These games have had me absolutely addicted since I first got Red Rescue Team around the age of eight. The style of gameplay was relatively unique to me; the story was so deep and so moving; and, perhaps most of all, it provided a new look as to how Pokémon, as a series, could be played out. As one could possibly imagine, I was absolutely ecstatic when I finally heard about this game's upcoming release, even if it was so late into the fifth generation of Pokémon. I mean, heck, the sixth generation that is Pokémon X/Y is coming out in just over six months!

PMD3 comes out based on the fifth generation of Pokémon games, featuring over 144 Pokémon primarily released in Pokémon Black/White Versions and their respective pseudo-sequels. This is a point by which the repetition in the mainstream games is getting a little to the extreme - little has really changed, mechanically, since the original GameBoy games. Less are getting the games for fear of playing the same games again, and now people are resorting to the side series (like PMD or Pokémon Conquest), or just other series entirely.

Perhaps there's more innovation here than even in the previous two entries in the series? Perhaps there's a justifiable reason for having only around 1/4 of the Pokémon the previous Mystery Dungeon games had? Well, you're playing the game, so I'll leave it up to you.

All of my meaningless babbling aside, I hope you enjoy this FAQ!!

 
 
 
 
 

Pre-Credits Walkthrough

Format (READ!)

Each sub-section of the Pre-Credits Walkthrough and Post-Credits Walkthrough will begin with a header not unlike that above here. This will cover a relatively large amount of data, due to dungeons and such, so I devised a bit of a formatting scheme to aid in navigation. First, you'll find a "flowchart" not unlike the one below here. It will be headed by two horizontal lines and whitespace will be used to maintain spacing between sections - the same goes for each individual area or important segment in the walkthroughs. And, yes, that flowchart will even apply to this section on the formatting schemes.

The only formatting worth mentioning is the dungeon formatting, really, because everything else remains more-or-less a block of text without real concern. However, those, too, are headed by the horizontal lines.





Sectional Flowchart







Dungeon Formatting



Whenever a dungeon is listed within the walkthrough, you will get three primary bits of information - the dungeon's length, the main Pokémon type within the dungeon, and whether Pokémon can as-of-yet be recruited in the dungeon. An example of this type of formatting is below, within the blue box - however, note that it is not within a blue box within the walkthroughs!

INTRODUCTORY DATA EXAMPLE/INTERPRETATION

  • Dungeon Length: 15 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

From this, you can readily determine that the dungeon will end on or around 15F - various conditions can cause a plus-or-minus one variance in this statistic, but that much is usually negligible. You'll also learn that the main Pokémon type is in the dungeon (the Ivy Park, in this example) is Grass, thusly implying that Fire, Ice, Flying, Poison, and Bug Pokémon are well-suited for this dungeon. Finally, it does in fact seem Pokémon can be recruited from this dungeon, so it would be wise to consider looking more thorough at the Pokémon residents for key Pokémon for your party.

Next up, you'll find some data on the resident Pokémon. This will include their species name, by which they are sorted alphabetically. Then there is their Pokémon number as according to the National Pokédex of Pokémon Black/White Versions 2. Following that is their type, from which critiques will be made later for strategy. Finally, you'll find the general area in the dungeon, by floors, where the Pokémon can be encountered.

Example:

=--RESIDENTIAL POKÉMON DATA EXAMPLE/INTERPRETATION--=

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RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Amoonguss #591 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 4F
Whirlipede #544 Bug/Poison 5F ~ 14F

From this table, we can see that there are two Pokémon in the dungeon: Amoonguss and Whirlipede. We can tell they're from the fifth generation of Pokémon, as their Pokémon # is greater than 493, and that these are of the Grass/Poison and Bug/Poison types, respectively. We also know that you will only find Amoonguss through 4F, after which you only find Whirlipede. It can also be assumed to be ideal to bring Fire- or Flying-type Pokémon here, as they have advantages over both Pokémon without the tables being able to be turned. (For example, Psychic would also work. However, Whirlipede's Bug-typing counteracts that.

Third in the dungeons will be a list of Pokémon type data. These Pokémon will be grouped primarily upon their type among the bullets that divide them rather than effectively listing the same thing over and over again just because we have 15 pure Water-type Pokémon in a dungeon or something - therefore, be sure to look carefully rather than just scan the first word of the bullets. Listed will be what the Pokémon is weak to, what the Pokémon takes little damage from (the immunities in the mainstream games), what types the Pokémon has a type-based advantage over, and then, as applicable, any other notable information, like abilities or particularly-annoying moves. You can find examples of this in the walkthroughs or in the DLC Dungeons section - Ivy Park is one example of a dungeon.

Finally, at the end of the Pokémon listings, any additional info to note will be listed. For example, special rooms or bosses to fight. After this amount of info you've read on formatting, that much should be plenty easy to deal with.

Well, I guess you're ready for the walkthrough. Read on!



Welcome to Paradise!




Sectional Flowchart







Starter/Partner Pokémon Analyses



Pokémon Type Ability Known Moves Current Stats
Level: Max HP: Attack: Defense: Sp.Atk.: Sp.Def.:
Pikachu Electric Static Fake Out, Thundershock, Growl, Tail Whip 7 53 15 19 18 19
Tepig Fire Blaze Tackle, Ember, Tail Whip, Covet 7 50 17 19 15 19
Oshawott Water Torrent Tackle, Water Gun, Tail Whip, Assurance 7 50 15 19 17 19
Axew Dragon Mold Breaker Snatch, Assurance, Leer, Focus Energy 7 50 16 20 15 20
Snivy Grass Overgrow Tackle, Vine Whip, Leer, Pursuit 7 50 16 19 16 19

You can see more in-depth data on the Pokémon by clicking their hyperlinked names in the leftmost column.

Overall, what Pokémon you choose will matter fairly little, at least early on. Stats remain similar and type weakness comprehension is needed little due to relative enemy incompetence. You may want to go with two Pokémon who have advantages over types that are to get advantages over - Axew comes to mind for being a Dragon-type, and he has a nice variety of moves later on, plus the ability to use any move because of Mold Breaker. Tepig is one of those Pokémon that can get a dual-advantage over the Steel-type after he evolves (and still has one before evolving), and that's useful as the Steel-type has 11 resistances of 17 types. Then again, you could go with your favorite Pokémon - like me, I chose Pikachu and Snivy, some of the less strategic Pokémon.

Just be sure to try and make your partner, chosen later, complement your starter Pokémon (you). And note that you cannot have two of the same Pokémon.




The Transformation



At the title screen, begin by selecting the option "New Game". In the demo version, you'll be made aware that you will be able to use your items and teammates and such from this demo's save file in the full version. The demo version will end just before Hazy Pass, which is not all that far away - maybe an hour at the most. Still, if you don't want to have to redownload this, I guess you could try not saving and stopping gameplay just before going to Hazy Pass/. Anyways, pointlessness aside...

You begin by seeing a colorful, rainbow-hued haze. Dazed and confused as to where you are, or if you're even conscious, you begin to hear a voice crying for help. It seems the Pokémon world is at the brink of disaster, but from what is not known - the connection is cut off too soon. All you see is a lone Munna being pursued by a Hydreigon. That alone is concerning, but there's little that can be done now.

You begin to see your silhouette in the haze. Suddenly, the shadow shifts and you recognize a new form. This form you can choose. You will be allowed to choose your Pokémon; see the Starter/Partner Pokémon Analyses section for more details. After doing so, you come to face that you are, in fact, no longer human, but a Pokémon! You approach the pulsing sphere of light in the distance, sensing that that is where the cry for help came from. Suddenly, the area turns dark and what is presumably a Magnagate opens up!

You are sent skydiving a long distance to the ground from the hole in the sky. Luckily just dazed by the fall, you are urged into full consciousness by another. As you open your eyes, you get a glance at this Pokémon. You can choose this Pokémon now - your partner; see the Starter/Partner Pokémon Analyses section, again.

Your partner is happy to see that you're okay, although your own confusion at seeing a Pokémon speak is quite obvious. After you glance up the sky to see nothing showing where you came from, your partner introduces himself, and you're prompted to do the same - feel free to fill in a name for yourself. Your partner then inquires as to where you came from. You ponder over how to answer this for a while - you did come from the human world through a hole in the sky after all, but that justs seems too fantastical to believe. Then again, why be branded a liar already? Eventually, you decide to tell the truth and your partner believes it, just like that.

As you and he have a one-sided conversation for a bit, your partner realizes that he forgot his important meeting. And he also forgets that the path ahead is tough. Eventually, you are enlisted to help your partner through Ragged Mountain.





Ragged Mountain



  • Dungeon Length: 5 floors
  • Dominant Types: Psychic (by a slight margin)
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Not at this time

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Drilbur #529 Ground 2F, 4F
Gothita #574 Psychic 2F
Minccino #572 Normal 2F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 2F, 4F

  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It has an advantage over Poison, Electric, Rock, Steel, and Fire.
  • Gothita is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It has an advantage over Fighting, Poison, Grass, and Bug.

1F: As you and your partner arrive in this dungeon, your partner will approach the bridge. Finding it collapsed and his journey already nearly at an end, he finds a cavern nearby to go through. It is through there you'll find the main dungeon. As you progress through the dungeon, you'll learn the basics of gameplay, which are akin to that of previous Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games. Read the text to learn, and there's more in the menus as needed.

If you're unfamiliar to the formatting of this guide, there is little else to mention, because dungeons are normally randomly generated. Your goal, however, is to find the stairs in the dungeon to progress to the next floor. Along the way, you'll find a number of Pokémon, as outlined above. You can beat these with basic moves (A Button) that waste no PP but are less powerful, or use the L Button and another button as on the game screen to determine which move to use. These latter moves can differ in their ranges, power, and they also use PP - and they also trigger enemies to drop more EXP. than usual. This EXP. will later level your Pokémon up, strengthening them, teaching them new moves, and eventually allowing them to evolve. Pokémon only drop EXP. (and whatever items they're holding) when defeated.

As you go along the dungeons, you may also find items on the floor. You can pick these up by walking over them. You'll mostly find Oran Berry items in this dungeon, which are useful in healing HP. Aside from that, there should be only one last dungeon-specific thing to mention: the Wonder Tile. As you go throughout a dungeon, you may be affected by moves like Growl or Tail Whip, which can reduce your stats. You don't want that!

Also, during the dungeons, you'll find sparkly things, like the tree trunk you'll find on 3F in the dungeon. You can examine this with the A Button to interact with it - in this case, providing a way across. You'll finally also find various ungridded areas (contrasting the main dungeons), like the aforementioned area with the tree trunk. However, battles will later on become possible in those areas by making contact with certain Pokémon, and that will turn the area to a grid for the time being.





Pokémon Paradise and Post Town



After having beaten the Ragged Mountain, you and your partner will progress on to your partner's destination. He wanted to go to a barren land, land that he bought from Quagsire so that he could design his own Pokémon Paradise - a kind of a mini-utopia for all Pokémon. Obviously, this lifeless land could use some work, and it's surrounded by Mystery Dungeons - dungeons with randomized layouts, like most dungeons in this game. Your partner decides to ask you for some help. Realizing that you have no place to go, nor any idea how to help the Munna from your vision, you agree. You and he spend that night under the open stars, a little chilly, quickly agreeing your first priority should be to make a house.

The next morning, you'll progress, along with Quagsire, to the Post Town. Post Town is akin to the Pokémon Square of PMD1: Red/Blue Rescue Teams, or the Treasure Town of PMD2: Explorers of Time/Darkness/Sky - there, you'll find various shops. For example, there is an item shop run by Kecleon, whose stock changes daily. Rampardos will open certain treasure boxes, Cinccino will sell gifts, Foongus will handle DLC, Cofagrigus will trade gold bars for money, and whoever takes Roggenrola's place will help level up moves. However, all of these areas, except for Kecleon's place, are unavailable. Also near Kecleon's is a small chest you can use to store items and money.

When you arrive, you'll soon see an altercation between a Swanna and a Roggenrola. One over a trivial issue, I might add - it's been theorized that the Mystery Dungeon pandemic is beginning to stress out everyone. Quagsire heads off to find Gurdurr, the carpenter. Feel free to visit Kecleon's shop and the storage chest in the meantime, then head west. After a scene with Gurdurr's apprentices, the two Timburrs, you'll go inside to speak with Gurdurr. After a rather stressful cutscene, Gurdurr agrees to the job. He cares not about the lack of money - he would prefer you go to the Stony Cave and grab him five blue stones from there.

Okay, whatever. When you leave, feel free to visit the shops - well, what little you can - then head back east to the crossroads. After speaking with Quagsire for a brief moment there, where his lack of concern based upon his faith in you and your partner is noted, head north and use the world map to head to the second dungeon.





Stony Cave



  • Dungeon Length: 5 floors + end
  • Dominant Types: Flying (by a slight margin)
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Not at this time

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying B2F ~ B4F
Drilbur #529 Ground B1F, B2F, B5F
Gothita #574 Psychic B2F ~ B5F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug B2F ~ B5F
Klink #599 Steel B1F ~ B4F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying B2F ~ B4F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground and Ghost. It has a type advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Steel, Rock, Fire, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Bug, and Ghost. It is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Flying, Water, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Woobat is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Grass, and Bug.

At the end of the dungeon, you and your partner will come across an absolute hoarde of blue crystals. They are quite likely those Gurdurr wanted, so we as well snag some of them. After doing so, you'll return to Post Town. Save on the way out!





Scraggy the Thief



After you reminiscence at the crossroads, you and your partner will head on into town. As you do, a Scraggy bumps into your partner in a hurry before fleeing just as quickly. Well, whatever - this could have no effects on the plot whatsoever. You'll then visit Gurdurr, who is pleased to build your house, once you hand over the five blue gems. ... ... Oh crap. I guess we won't get our house today. We probably already know the cause, knowing RPG tradition, but our main characters have yet to deduce the reasoning, so we settle on one thing - a return to Stony Cave!

Of course, there's probably a reason I didn't link to that section, and it has nothing to do with it just being above here. As you head east out of town, you see the shifty-looking Scraggy run off, and you finally figure out what happened, perhaps - your partner was bumped and dropped the gems, and the Scraggy, finding rare gems, stole them! As you prepare to make chase, the Timburr apprentices stop you. They seem to know this Scraggy and his intended destination: Hazy Pass. (Hey, blue text - you know what that means!) The Timburr also seem to mysteriously know what occurred - you were mugged - without even being nearby. Curiouser and curiouser...

Anyways, prepare for that dungeon, then head to the crossroads and north from there to Hazy Pass.





Hazy Pass



  • Dungeon Length: 8 floors + end (9F)
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Not at this time

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Audino #531 Normal 2F, 4F, 5F, 7F, 8F
Gurdurr #533 Fighting 6F (boss)
Scraggy #559 Dark/Fighting 6F, 9F (boss)
Sewaddle #540 Bug/Grass 2F, 4F, 5F, 7F, 8F
Wooper #194 Water/Ground 1F ~ 5F, 7F, 8F

  • Audino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages, but is a little bit more powerful physicially than the others.
  • Sewaddle is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Wooper is weak to Grass (4x), and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Rock, Fire, Ground, Electric, Poison, and Steel.

When you are on 1F, head to the right and examine the sparkly tree stump to raise one nearby. Just to the right of the raised stump is a Wooper. This is what happens in one of these "outside areas". There is no true grid system until you encounter a relatively hostile Pokémon, such as this Wooper. At that point, the field becomes gridded, like a traditional Pokémon Mystery Dungeon floor. Note that, in this particular instance, the grids are oriented in diamonds - therefore, you'll want to hold the R Button to move in a straight line (northwest, northeast, southeast, southwest), or don't do so to diagonally cross the grid - basically the opposite of traditional floors. This doesn't apply for all instances. Anyways, defeat the Wooper; it's data is above here. Afterwards, the area reverts to a gridless state, as when you entered.

To the northeast is another shiny stump to examine, to the south of which is another Wooper to battle. Go east from there to find the final shiny stump to examine - if you examined them all, then all three stumps near the entrance should have risen. Examine them and opt to move forward. You'll move to 2F, which is your general dungeon floor.

Once on 3F, which is another Outside Area, examine the sparkling tree stumps to the left and right first. South of the latter, you'll find another Wooper to battle. Defeat him and the one roaming around to the east of there. I will also note that I found a sparkling area just to the left of the big rock between these two Woopers, which contained a Petrify Orb. Just so you know. You can trigger it by just running over it. East of there, near the non-sparkling tree stump near the fence, I found another such sparkling area, this one containing a Gold Bar! ^_^ Examine the sparkling tree stump north of there and that should raise up all three stumps to the west. Examine this staircase-like structure to proceed on to 4F, another general dungeon floor.

Between 4F and 5F, you'll find what I dub a "breather floor". It's been traditional in most Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games insofar. Usually, though, it would divide dungeon from dungeon - like in the "Explorers of..." series, I recall Steam Cave being divided from the Upper Steam Cave. Stuff like that. Here, though, dungeons themselves can be divided up by these. They do not count as they're own floor - sorry, but you'll still have to deal with 5F next. However, there is a Deposit Box for your money and items here, and you can also do a full-fledged save by opening the menu with the X Button. Additionally, upon entrance here, your HP, PP, and status is completely healed! Beyond that, just proceed north on to 5F, a traditional dungeon floor again.

When you reach 6F, you finally catch up to Scraggy. As your partner gets ready for the battle, you see someone following you. You quickly shove you and your partner behind a rock and tell him to shut up (effectively), then you see your stalker - Gurdurr! It quickly becomes apparent the two are in cahoots for the money people -- I mean Pokémon like you need to build homes. Obviously, there shall be no home for you; just more scamming, they think. Eventually, your partner gets ahead of himself and rushes the two, with you following. This leads, expectedly, to a boss fight!

BOSS (6F): Gurdurr and Scraggy

  • Gurdurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Scraggy is weak to Fighting and Flying, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.

Lucky for you, none of the starter Pokémon actually are at a disadvantage in this fight. But that's also true the other way around - you can't have an advantage over these guys without having done some serious leveling, maybe. Anyhow, what to do? Well, note first that the field is a diagonally-gridded field - i.e. to move straight from square to square, you must use R, but to go diagonally across, you'll just use Up/Down/Left/Right.

A good start would always be to use a Blast Seed here - it actually one-hit kills Scraggy! From there, you shouldn't have too much of a problem with Gurdurr. You can always try to use the stat-reducing moves (Tail Whip being pretty useful for lowering Defense), restrict your partner's move to strictly-offensive ones (if Axew is Level 10, stick him with only Dragon Rage!), or abuse abilities (get Pikachu close to abuse Static and thereby allow the enemy to be paralyzed). Don't be afraid to heal, though.

After the battle... Well....

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

Scraggy flees the scene, knowing it is a futile effort to try and fight against you. Gurdurr still has some fight left in him though and prepares for round two. A voice echoes from the cave nearby - it is his apprentice Timburrs! They beg for Gurdurr to let their lives return to how they once were - all they do now is hurt people who have done no wrong, and for what? A few small chunks of gold here and there? The Timburr simply want to work and live honestly. Gurdurr will have none of this and smacks them hard with his girder, then progresses on, leaving with but a simple statement - this is how they must live now.

Suddenly, the Timburr awaken, hurt but okay. They decide to give you a backstory as to how the two of them got in this relationship. They saw Gurdurr one day, with his amazing strength many a moon ago. The Timburr were in awe, and decided to join him. Initially, it was fun - Gurdurr wasn't always this scamming, no-good thief. However, Gurdurr got injured and couldn't put out the quality of work his clients were used to. Eventually, despite his effort and pride in what work he did, he got less work, then his skills were less refined, so they had to live minimally. But they were happy nevertheless.

Eventually, a Pokémon came one day and asked for a house. The three poured their heart and soul into it. But, when the work was done, all that their client could do was complain about the house and its supposed lack of quality - amounting to that Pokémon simply destroying the house, right in front of them. They eventually learned, though, that this Pokémon was simply TOYING with them - it was all a big joke for him - just so he wouldn't have to pay.

Gurdurr eventually just gave up after that - stopped working, stopped building, sinking ever further into the depths of despair. Of course, he still had to eat - and so he got into the scamming business as a method of revenge against the world that he thought had cheated him... Of course, as your partner points out, it was meant as a joke - a crude joke, but a joke - Gurdurr's work was still good. The Timburr mentioned this, too, to Gurdurr, to no avail.

The Timburr want out of this life quite terribly now. And so, they told you where Scraggy - and eventually Gurdurr - were heading. Maybe you could talk sense into him, or just break up their union - then they could lead their peaceful life once again.

After all of this conversing, you and your partner then decide on what may be Gurdurr's last chance to lead the life the Timburr desire - Gurdurr will build your house! This obviously surprises the Timburr, but your partner is dead-set on it. And so, the decision is made. Gurdurr has headed further into the dungeon. Let's go convince him to do it!

Be sure to save the game as you enter 7F, another typical dungeon floor. Also note that the two Timburr have joined you. Imagine them like pre-evolved Gurdurr because ... well, that's what they are! =P You'll also find a breather floor between 7F and 8F, the latter of which is a traditional dungeon floor as well.

Once on 9F, you see Gurdurr examining his injury and decide to go ahead to him alone (with your partner of course). A fight eventually does break out, despite your initial efforts.

BOSS (9F): Gurdurr

  • Gurdurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.

Well, it's not like this is going to be any harder than the previous fight versus Scraggy and Gurdurr. Now it's already a 2-on-1. If you somehow grinded enough in a dungeon to gain an advantage over Gurdurr, kudos, but you shouldn't this strategy, then. =P Anyhow, what to do? You can simply get close and use moves of your Pokémon's type, which deals out 50% more damage than a different-typed move of the same power (commonly named "STAB" - same-type attack bonus). That's all you really need to in this fight. Items like Violent Seeds and Blast Seeds are noticeably helpful if you've played some of the Magnagate Dungeons as well or bought them or something. If you chose Pikachu as your starter, you should have Thunder Wave by Level 10, so be sure to use that to paralyze him. Not hard at all.

After Gurdurr goes into a brief stint post-battle about how this is how the world works - the honest are the fools, and the biggest liar wins - your partner says that may be true, but that's also why he wants to change the world. He recognizes this is bad; why can't everyone else? This matter aside, you try to convince him to build you the house - you'll even get the money and materials - but his dismisses this, because of his back injury. However, you convince Gurdurr, then, to try and get better - more used to his injury - and your partner remains stubborn on the point of having Gurdurr build your house. It doesn't have to be perfect, just from the heart. Eventually, you do convince him to build the house... After he vents his emotions.



Expanding Paradise!




Sectional Flowchart








Our New Home!

Several days after the events of Hazy Pass, our house is completed. Personally, I think it looks rather nice, even if Gurdurr denies it. -_- After the Timburr comment semi-negatively on the house's aesthetics, your partner emphasizes that they put their heart and soul into this house, and that's all that matters. Well, save the game!

The next morning, after awakening, your partner decides to think about expanding the Paradise - shops, Berry fields, stuff like that which will help us further down the road. 'Course, we might actually find more Mystery Dungeons if we dig around - not a problem for me, personally. So, we'll need more land and Pokémon to trust. We decide on having two others join us to form a team. Well, one thing at a time. Leave your house by going south.

There, you'll find that Quagsire was just outside, watching you sleep, waiting for to awaken. >_> He has something to tell you, but not here. He goes elsewhere to mention the Request Board to you. It contains general information about rescuing and specific rescue requests. You know, like the bulletin boards of the other Mystery Dungeon games. This missions can be anything, including "give me a certain item" or "capture this bad guy" or "just get me outta here!". In return, you will get money and items!

Quagsire then points out the nearby Deposit Box and his shop before explaining the mission acceptance process. You first take a mission from the Request Board, accept it, and take it to the nearby Azumarill, and you'll be allowed to go on the mission. When you meet the objective in a mission, you will be allowed to escape, or continue on - note, however, that this does not mean you can do multiple missions from the same dungeon in one run of it like other Mystery Dungeon games. You can only do one mission per day. (Yeah, I know. Dumb.) Your partner then gets to pick one of the missions. Eventually, you learn what mission your partner chose - rescuing a Dunsparce from Stompstump Peak. It doesn't yield much money, but that doesn't really matter. Now all you need to do is go to that dungeon.

And, no, this is not some random "KeyBlade999 got lucky..." thing. It's fixed. So, once you regain control, you'll also learn that something is in the Passerby Post. Go southwest and across the bridge, then examine the mailbox to find a letter. It basically introduces the rescue system for when you get in trouble. Basically, you'll use StreetPass to take a Reviver Seed from someone - this works in reverse, too. Yeah, that's it - nothing like in the other games, which is a huge disappointment, given the relative rarity of 3DS holders or people owning this game. So, yeah, don't get in trouble, ya hear? Still, may as well put one in there... (There is one already in there, so if you don't want to do this, you just got a free Reviver Seed.)

Well, that's about it. If you want to return to Post Town, have Azumarill cancel the Stompstump Peak job for you - you can't leave the Paradise Center if the gate's still open. However, there's little there - most of the shopkeeps have oddly disappeared - except Kecleon's shop. It's different from Quagsire's, so it's worth a check if you want certain things. Otherwise, have Azumarill open up the Request Gate if necessary, then go on through.





Stompstump Peak



  • Dungeon Length: It's kind of vague...
    • One outside area, the entrance, is traversed thrice...
    • Two other outside areas are used...
    • Two single-floor mini-dungeons are navigated...
    • One two-floor (floors are not named) dungeon is navigated...
    • ... So you could probably say it is a nine-floor dungeon.
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Not at this time

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Bagon #371 Dragon Outside, Caves
Petilil #548 Grass Outside, Caves
Sewaddle #540 Bug/Grass Outside, Caves
Tympole #535 Water Outside, Caves

  • Bagon is weak to Dragon and Ice, and has an advantage over Dragon-types.
  • Petilil is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Bug, and Poison, and has an advantage over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Sewaddle is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Tympole is weak to Grass and Electric, and have a type-based advantage over Fire, Rock, and Ground. Be especially careful of its Supersonic move that may cause instant Confusion.
  • Zoroark is weak to Fighting and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic. It has an advantage over Psychic and Ghost.

At the dungeon entrance, which is one of those outside areas, you'll basically find a fork. Look around for Pokémon to battle (it's random around here), so do so - odds are the battle will be able both of them if they're both on-screen at the same time, so you know. Then you need to head into one of the caverns. I would arbitrarily pick the eastern cavern first, but do as you will. We'll be assuming for the cutscenes that you picked the Eastern Cave first.

If you go into the Eastern Cavern, you'll traverse a traditional dungeon floor before reaching the Eastern Plateau. there, go east and defeat the nearby Pokémon in battle. Then examine the sparkling logs nearby. They'll float downstream and form a partial bridge to the main central cave near the entrance.

Cross the bridge nearby and head south to speak with your partner briefly on Dunsparce's lack of being here. Suddenly, an Emolga comes up to you - given that it notes how Dunsparce isn't here, it's likely to be rescuing him, too. Emolga decides to help you look for him (though he doesn't join your party), even though you will get a "dinky reward" - in reality, though, Emolga is a good friend of Dunsparce. Anyways, moving on... There's little to do here, so head to the south and examine the broken bridge. Looks like you could use it as a ladder, so do so and head into the other cavern.

If you go into the Western Cavern, you'll go through a traditional dungeon floor until you hit the Western Plateau, another outside area. Go northwest and defeat the two Pokémon there in a battle. Afterwards, examine the sparkling logs nearby to form a partial bridge down in the entrance area - or finish one if you already did the Eastern Cave. There's no cutscene here if you've already done the Eastern Cavern - if you haven't, go south to meet Emolga - but there's still a ladder to return you to the entrance.

Once you've beaten both caves and finished the log bridge, go back down to the bottom where you entered the dungeon. In the center should be a bridge to cross. Cross it and enter the cavern. This central cavern consists of a lone floor (traditional dungeon again) to traverse before you reach the next area. You'll find a small clearing in the cavern. Dunsparce has still yet to be found, but you see something sparkling nearby - some kind of crystal. Despite the fact that these are placed haphazardly, they're placed almost like a mirror. Your partner will decide to take some for the house. Well, moving on to another dungeon floor. (You're fully healed in this interim somehow.)

After that second dungeon floor, you'll see Dunsparce off in the distance! He'll thank you graciously as Emolga walks up, too. Emolga also thanks you, and the dungeon is complete!





Dunsparce and Virizion



Back in town, after rescuing Dunsparce, you'll get your reward - a Blast Seed and a Red Key, plus 100 Poké. Emolga mildly scolds Dunsparce, who begins to beat himself up over not being strong, to which Emolga once again scolds him, this time on his heart being in the right place, at least. Dunsparce eventually speaks on why he went to the "dangerous" Stompstump Peak in the first place - to find those crystals, like we found. Your partner will hand one over. As for why he wanted one...? Well...

Virizion is a Pokémon that once often came to Post Town. Not only is she a legendary Pokémon (one of the four of the Musketeer set), but beautiful, adored by all the Pokémon. Perhaps adored is not the best word - how about "infatuated"? Anyways, Virizion has come here again today and it's quickly obvious just why Dunsparce wanted the crystals - a gift to Virizion! He's encouraged to give 'em to her, but he's not brave enough. Your partner volunteers to do all the talking, though, and Dunsparce reluctantly comes along.

There, everyone begins chatting it up with Virizion when she mentions that she initially came to Post Town for the Rainbows of Hope - two overlapping rainbows, sparkling in the sky that gave everyone hope for tomorrow and let them give their all for today. They haven't appeared for a while, though - some blame it on the Mystery Dungeons.

Well, back to the point, your partner suddenly mentions Dunsparce. He nervously approaches Virizion with the crystal to give to her, and a request to be his friend. She rejects (at least gradually) both - she doesn't make friends. The world is too rough; it is only really worth making friends with those who can help you or those who are really strong to her. Dunsparce runs out of the room, sobbing, realizing the meaning of this. Oof... Emolga, then your partner get furious at Virizion for being so cold, but she again elaborates on this being a rough world, et cetera, et cetera. Everyone actually cheers at her as she leaves. >:(

Meanwhile, some Pawniard leave after "their latest victim". Back to the point, it becomes obvious the cheering is because everyone else has also been rejected by Virizion and it's merely a way of shrugging off the sadness - gotta keep smiling to keep from crying, I suppose. Anyways, your partner opts to go find Dunsparce and calm him. Question is, where did he go? Well, get to hunting.

Search every part of Post Town, first. That includes the upper floor of Swanna's place, the main shopping square, the side area off to the west (you know, where Foongus's DLC shop is), the area up the stairs to the north of Foongus and Kecleon, and the area north of the stairs north of Kecleon (where Swadloon and Lillipup are). Once every place has been checked, attempt to leave town. Quagsire will then approach, saying he saw Dunsparce in the crossroads with two other strange Pokémon, some Pawniard if you know their looks. They draw him off to somewhere called Desolate Canyon, making sure he has money and the want to become strong quickly beforehand. Oh, this can not be good.

Quagsire also mentions Emolga and how he was shocked at the story, akin to you and your partner. Emolga then ran off somewhere. You'll run off after the both of them. When you regain control in the crossroads, be sure to prepare for Desolate Canyon, then head north from the crossroads to there.





Desolate Canyon



  • Dungeon Length: 7 floors + end (8F)
  • Dominant Types: Various (though Flying is dominant by an extremely slight margin)
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Not at this time

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 7F
Audino #531 Normal 1F ~ 7F
Blitzle #522 Electric 1F ~ 7F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 7F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 7F
Galvantula #596 Bug/Electric 8F (boss)
Klang #600 Steel 1F ~ 7F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 7F
Pawniard #624 Dark/Steel 8F (boss)
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 8F (boss)
Vullaby #629 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 7F

  • Archen is weak to Water, Electric, Steel, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Bug, Flying, Ice, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Audino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Blitzle is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. This Pokémon may have the Lightningrod ability, which will allow it to nullify any Electric-type move in the room and raise Blitzle's Special Attack, so take note of that.
  • Croagunk is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying. It is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.
  • Klang is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Ice and Rock. However, when I found one in the dungeon, it wouldn't awaken. I would assume it is like the Braviary of the Magnagate Dungeons I've played - don't awaken it or you'll die. I only really would be able to awaken it with a Blast Seed.
  • Litwick is weak to Ghost, Dark, Ground, Water, and Rock, and takes little damage from Normal and Fighting. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug.
  • Vullaby is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Psychic and Ground. It has advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.

As you enter the dungeon, you will attain the ability to determine your "party tactics" - basically how the AI handles your ally Pokémon's movements and strategies. If you press the X Button, then tap "Status", then "Tactics Meeting", you can change the strategy for individual allies (just your partner for now) or all of them ("All Members"). All of the traditional ones from previous Mystery Dungeon games are available, and their effects will scroll along the bottom of the screen. Unless a situation (i.e. low HP and no Oran Berry items left) dictates it, you should probably keep it on "Let's go together".

After you beat 7F, you'll watch as a thunderstorm brews off in the distance. Dunsparce is still following the Pawniard, but having doubts after having calmed himself to a more rational state. He begins to realize that it's not just power he merely wants, nor can it be gained so easily - he's begun to catch on to the Pawniards' ruse. As it looks like there's no hope, Emolga pops in. 'Course, against two Pawniard, it's not exactly all that even.

That's where you and your partner come in! Or so you think, anyways. After some typical back-and-forth banter, the Pawniard summon four other allies - two Galvantula and two Venipede. Our chances look quite slim now, and as the fight is about to commence, a voice echoes from the distance. And so we find Virizion - and Gurdurr and Timburr ... and I guess Timburr as well! And so begins the fight!

BOSS (8F): Pawniard, Pawniard, Galvantula, Galvantula, Venipede, and Venipede

Firstly, your enemies!

  • ENEMIES:
    • Pawniard is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground, and takes little damage from Psychic and Poison. It has an advantage over Psychic, Ghost, Rock, and Ice.
    • Galvantula is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
    • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.


Since we're here, we may as well cover your allies, too. Note that, to heal or otherwise aide these, you must throw an item at them.

  • ALLIES:
    • Virizion is of the Grass/Fighting type. She is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying (4x), Poison, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Dark, Steel, Rock, Ice, and Normal.
    • Gurdurr and the two Timburr are of the Fighting type. They are weak to Flying and Psychic and are advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Dark, and Steel.
    • Emolga is of the Electric/Flying type. He is weak to Ice and Rock and takes little damage from Ground. He has advantages over Flying, Water, Fighting, Grass, and Bug.
    • Dunsparce is of the Normal type. He is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. He lacks type-based advantages.

STRATEGY:

Geez, the field is a mess, ain't it? Anyways, with the fight being seven-on-six, you may want to peruse any Orbs you have first. Those like the Petrify Orb or the Foe-Hold Orb will basically kill your opponent by preventing their movement for a nice, long time. Other items, like Blast Seeds, Violent Seeds, or Reviver Seeds will also be an immense aid here. Good moves will be the ones that are relatively room-wide to reduce stats (such as Growl) or inflict statuses (like Thunder Wave and Sleep Powder). Other than that, you can try to restrict your partner's moves to be advantageous over his opponent. Beyond that, though, it's a pretty easy fight overall.

After the fight, all six of the enemies leave, with universal delight among you and your allies. Eventually, your partner gets to wondering as to how you all got here - it seems Virizion was watching while you discussed with Quagsire where to find Dunsparce. Dunsparce once again beats himself up over being gullible enough to believe he achieve power in the blink of an eye and how it led to so much trouble so quickly after before, but Emolga -- well, you get the idea after last time.

Virizion also apologizes for being so blunt with Dunsparce earlier, but again insists being too trusting in this day and time is not entirely intelligent. But your partner then also notes that if you don't trust others, then you yourself will not be trusted. In turn, you fail to build alliances with others - you become isolated. At least Dunsparce is able to trust and that, in turn, makes him strong - not because of himself, but because he is strong with others, and they are strong with him.

And so, your partner then asks the important and obvious question - does Emolga and Dunsparce wish to join your team? They heartily accept the offer! (See their individual data at the linked sections.) Virizion then reluctantly asks if she can join as well - to everyone's surprise, and Emolga's hot-headed anger. Your partner nevertheless accepts the offer, unfazed. As your partner, Emolga, and Dunsparce verbally tussle around a bit, Virizion reminisces on her rather encouraging meeting with Gurdurr and the future....

Well, save then.





There's No "I" In Team!




The next morning, your partner awakens in a good mood, noting that you can now register as a team, since you have five Pokémon (technically needing just four). Of course, you finally pop out the question of "A team?" A team is a group facilitated by HAPPI (the Helping Adventurous Pokemon Prosper Institute) to help rescue Pokémon and make your adventures safer. Imagine it like the omniscient other corporations in previous Mystery Dungeon games if you've played them. They tend to support you with various items and upgrades and such.

Once you regain control, exit your house to meet up with Virizion, Emolga, and Dunsparce, plus a random Pelipper. As per the Pokémon games' usual, the latter has some mail for you - a letter from HAPPI requesting you to put a team name on the letter and return it to them, you'll be recognized as a team. After Emolga's overly-egomaniacal option for a name, you get to choose one as you wish. Do as you will - and, no, there is no default name. (For the record, the general name context is "You are the ____".) As I recall, one of the old default names was "PokéPals", so, if you're stuck, go with that.

Suddenly, Quagsire comes up with a gift offer... Of course, you follow him and find that Scraggy - yes, the scammer! - has set up shop next to Quagsire. His purpose is more benign, though - because Quagsire claimed, and I quote him, "I punished him thoroughly." O_o Anyways, like Gulpin and Electivire of previous Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, he is here to delete moves you don't want and relearn most non-TM/HM moves you have already learned! 'Course, it is also revealed that Quagsire is effectively a world-known Pokémon cop.

Quagsire will also mention that you can select which four members go off on adventures. (Or less than four, but no more than four.) You basically get to choose right now which Pokémon stays behind. Personally, I'd pick Dunsparce - even in the mainstream games, until you grab some TMs and HMs, Dunsparce is nigh useless strategically. That's later, though. You'll also learn that Pokémon can join your team now when you beat them in dungeons - yes, beat the crap of me and I'll join your team! -_- This includes the dungeons insofar and most others ahead of here. You will increase your recruitment rate by generally just powering up the lead Pokémon (in this case, you), as well as holding certain items or using gifts Cinccino makes.

A treasure chest then drops, coming from HAPPI. (Geez, UPS could make a fortune off of Pelippers.) Inside, you'll find a Team Bag and Team Badges symbolizing that you are a team. The Badges go for each team member (yeah, HAPPI gave you hundreds O_o) you have now and those you recruit later. This permits the growth of moves.

^sr2| See, as each move gets some use a bar will fill up next to the move, like in the attached screenshot. (The little green thing in Japanese is the move.) As it gets used more and more, you become more skilled at it. Eventually, a move will gain a new level - that is when the bar next to the move name as per the nearby screenshot fills thrice. (It does power-up and gain 1 PP with each filling of the bar, but it only gains an official level with every three fillings.) For example, take Thundershock on Pikachu. It starts as Thundershock, then later becomes Thundershock II, then Thundershock III, then Thundershock IV, then Thundershock V, then Thundershock VI, and it ends at Thundershock VII. Each time, the move becomes more powerful and more accurate, and it'll even increase in PP!! Additionally, it's also like the Pokémon you're allied with learn from you. Basically, then, if one of your team's Pokémon gets, say, Hydro Cannon III or whatever, then everyone else with the move Hydro Cannon gets Hydro Cannon III, even if they've never used it before! The growth for any given move is actually shared throughout the team!

There are two more benefits to the Team Badges. Firstly, EXP. is shared throughout the entire team - basically, that means you could leave a Pokémon back in Pokémon Paradise for the whole game, not use him at all from Level 1, and later come back and find him to be Level 100. Additionally, you gain knowledge of Team Skills. You can see the linked section for more info, but they're basically team-wide abilities that you can find by looking in the treasure chests of some dungeons. For example, you can throw items further, or know if there are Monster Houses or shops nearby, or recover PP in-between floors!

^sr3| Another unmentioned benefit is "Team Attack". "Team Attack" will occur the party gets in sync. This basically means that, as you battle Pokémon, you'll become more likely to achieve this ability. It also tends to happen more when you are in low HP or have many enemy Pokémon nearby or have more Pokémon (two or more, but even more than two is better) in the party. When it does occur, a badge will shine in the top-left corner of the screen, and one will also blatantly appear on the Touch Screen when you hold down the L Button. If you tap the Touch Screen's emblem, everyone will attack at once, dealing massive damage all of the Pokémon in the room. The status will not go away until you either use it or leave the dungeon - you can go from floor to floor and keep it for when you really need it, which you should! After usage, it'll need the usual building-up, as before, to regain the status.

So, phew! Go to Quagsire to manage your party details, then prepare as you will. You will then play for several "filler" days. I will also note you can go to the Forest Grotto and Mountain Pass dungeons, which we shall cover. Also, in the Post Town, Rampardos's Box Busting shop is open - basically, bring him treasure boxes, pay 150 Poké, and get items. Treasure Boxes are found in dungeons, usually.

THE FILLER DAY

In this FAQ and this game, a "filler day" refers to a time when there is nothing plot-based to do whatsoever. You can do what you want, I suppose, so long as you eventually go to the next day. Do rescues from the Request Board, primarily - there's nothing specific you have to do. When it comes to filler days, it's mostly up to you on what to do. So do stuff. Enjoy yourself. Whatever.

After one filler day... Well, we get to the Gurdurr Sets Up Shop! section for that. The two new dungeons - the Forest Grotto and the Mountain Pass are below.





Forest Grotto



  • Dungeon Length: 7 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass (marginal difference)
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 7F
Bagon #371 Dragon 1F ~ 7F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 7F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 7F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 7F
Petilil #548 Grass 1F ~ 7F
Sewaddle #540 Grass/Bug 1F ~ 7F
Tympole #535 Water 1F ~ 7F
Vullaby #629 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 7F

  • Archen is weak to Water, Steel, Electric, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fire, Bug, Flying, Ice, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Bagon is weak to Dragon and Ice, and advantageous over Dragon.
  • Croagunk is weak to Flying, Psychic (4x), and Ground. It has an advantage over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Bug, Flying, and Psychic, and has advantages over Rock, Water, Ground, and Grass.
  • Litwick is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug.
  • Petilil is weak to Fire, Ice, Bug, Flying, and Poison, and are advantageous over Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Sewaddle is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Poison, and Rock. It has type-based advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Dark, Grass, and Psychic.
  • Tympole is weak to Grass and Electric, and has an advantage over Rock, Fire, and Ground.
  • Vullaby is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Psychic and Ground. It has advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.




Mountain Pass



  • Dungeon Length: 7 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 7F
Blitzle #522 Electric 1F ~ 7F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 7F
Cottonee #546 Grass 1F ~ 7F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 7F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 7F
Petilil #548 Grass 1F ~ 7F
Sewaddle #540 Bug/Grass 1F ~ 7F
Swinub #220 Ground 1F ~ 7F
Tympole #535 Water 1F ~ 7F
Vullaby #629 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 7F

  • Archen is weak to Water, Steel, Electric, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fire, Bug, Flying, Ice, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Blitzle is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water.
  • Braviary is weak to Ice, Rock, and Electric and takes little damage from Ground or Ghost. It is also one of those Pokémon that appear rarely and randomly, and is quite powerful at this point in the game, so I would not recommend bothering with it at all.
  • Cottonee and Petilil are weak to Fire, Ice, Bug, Flying, and Poison, and are advantageous over Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Bug, Flying, and Psychic, and has advantages over Rock, Water, Ground, and Grass.
  • Litwick is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug.
  • Sewaddle is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Poison, and Rock. It has type-based advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, Dark, Grass, and Psychic.
  • Swinub is weak to Ice, Water, and Grass, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Electric, Rock, Fire, Poison, and Steel.
  • Tympole is weak to Grass and Electric, and has an advantage over Rock, Fire, and Ground.
  • Vullaby is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Psychic and Ground. It has advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.




Gurdurr Sets Up Shop!



After a single filler day in the game, as you exit your house to the Paradise Center, you'll meet up with Gurdurr, who decides to set up shop to get back in the swing of things, I suppose. He also wants to thank you for your help in setting him straight, so he decides to help you expand your Paradise! (Or just stay close to Virizion. Whatever gets Gurdurr to slave for us, I suppose.) Of course, it wouldn't be for free - you'll gather materials and some money and he'll build the place. Right now, he wants some Sturdy Vines. Sturdy Vines are found primarily as rewards from Request Board stuff.

Yeah, and they're not uncommon. I found five full pages allowing for such rewards - that's 20. So, yeah, take your pick - there's nothing particular that you have to deal with. After completing a mission rewarding you with a Sturdy Vine(s) - most of those I saw actually yielded three - you'll go to Gurdurr the next day. He is tearful with joy at this... Odd. Well, whatever - he promises to give you the best he's got.

That's it for now. Play through another filler day. Once you do, the day after, go to the Paradise Center. There, Gurdurr will scream from afar and approach you, alongside his Timburr apprentices. Now, today, Gurdurr is open for business! (Well, his shop anyways. Not Gurdurr himself. That'd be weird.) Now, all you have to do is speak with Gurdurr to add various facilities to your Paradise. First, he has to prepare the land - clear it, survey it, etc. - before he can get to building facilitaties. Both require some materials - like those vines and stuff - and both require money. See the Pokémon Paradise Stores section for more details.

For now, we want to develop land. For a while, you will be focused on expanding the Paradise and building shops and such. You have only one type of land for now - the Pleasant Plain. You'll need Rich Soils and Fresh Herbs for that, so go for missions that have those as the rewards. Beyond that, you'll need to decide what type of store or whatever to put there. For now, also, Gurdurr will only let you set up the center square of the Paradise as anything. See, the paradise is a 3x3 grid of nine squares. The bottom-center square is the Paradise Center, your place, and stuff, I suppose - the rest, open land.

Once you get one Pleasant Plain arranged, Gurdurr, out of the sheer goodness of his heart (or some random, questionable Berries) decides to give you the materials for an Oran Field - which mass-grows (sort of) Oran Berries! Woo! All you need to do is go to the prepared land and request one be made. For the sake of constancy, go there now (basically keep going north) and build that Oran Field. We now need to get two other facilities built, so do as you will with that. You can see the materials needed in the Pokémon Paradise Stores section or just by using the "Materials" thing in the X Button menu. So, more missions!

Or not. I think it loses plot relevance at this point what you do or don't. Well, still, do what you wish with it.



New Allies, New Dreams!




Sectional Flowchart








Victini and the V-Wave!



Sometime after the whole thing with Gurdurr and the Oran Field, you'll wake up one morning and, before the camera actually reaches "you", you'll see a meteor streak by in the sky. 'Course, the in-game you takes no notice of this whatsoever upon awakening, nor does your partner. Eh. Save and walk outside. There, you'll find a nice, beautiful day, with Dunsparce and Virizion nearby. Emolga, however, seems to have gotten lost on the trip over here. Additionally, the wind is sparkling rather oddly. Did a glitter factory blow up or something?

According to Herdier back in Post Town (and Virizion later) it seems to be something called the "V-Wave". It's basically a type-based wind that occurs around this time of year (in-game plot; sorry, you can't mess with your 3DS clock). Whatever type it "picks" and the Pokémon associated with that type basically get bonuses - moves will likely level up quicker, be more powerful, use less PP, and the user's Pokémon will also probably gain more EXP. Sometimes, you even get a 25%-off discount at shops! The type of the V-Wave changes with each in-game day.

Eventually, Emolga finally shows up, with the announcement that Quagsire has an announcement to make in the Paradise Center. To the left of the Gurdurr construction shop, you'll find a bulletin board forecasting the V-Wave for several days in the future. (I doubt it's 100% accurate, like real weather forecasting, but whatever.) As Emolga further elaborates on the V-Wave's potential for a team, the very air begins to vibrate. Obviously, everyone looks up to see a meteor speeding right for them! They begin to run as the meteorite lands right next to the V-Wavecast board.

...

And the meteor turns out to be Victini. Wow. How ... melodramatic, I guess is the term. It quickly becomes apparent that Victini comes here as the V-Wave does, though usually not this flashily. For you, his main purpose in being here (other than scaring the crap outta you like that) is to let you change the V-Wave of the day with his V-Wheel. (I swear to God, all of those sudden flashes of color are giving me a migraine. x_x) The V-Wheel and its use is like playing roulette - you pay Victini money, and you might be able to choose the V-Wave type. Not always will you win, but you do sometimes. You also can only use it once daily (based on in-game time).

SPINNING THE V-WHEEL

^sr4| If you're able to stomach Victini, and want to put yourself at an advantage in dungeons or various other things (see the V-Wavecast for more), you can spin the V-Wheel once daily. You'll need some money, though, if you want a good chance. You can use the Circle Pad or D-Pad and the A Button to get more of Victini on the V-Wheel on the Touch Screen, if you have enough money. Press the Start Button to give the wheel a spin and see if you win! You can press the A Button after Victini flies around like a mad-Pokémon to stop the spinning.

Poké Used Chances of Winning
Chance: Odds: Percentage:
0 Poké 1 in 5 4 to 1 20%
1,000 Poké 2 in 5 3 to 2 40%
2,500 Poké 3 in 5 2 to 3 60%
5,000 Poké 4 in 5 1 to 4 80%
7,777 Poké 5 in 5 0 to 5 100%

Lessee... Also, new Traveling Sales-mon shops are now open in the western portion of Post Town. These Pokémon basically help you level up moves of a given type - however, note that the "true" Type Dojos you can build in Pokémon Paradise are much more effective. But that's about it for "new" stuff. Sift through the missions and pick out something else for another filler day.





A Strange Dream and the Great Glacier




After that filler day...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

Later that night, you have a rather particular dream. It begins once more in the rainbow-hued haze you saw so long ago. Suddenly, abruptly, it all becomes silent in the dream - barring one scream for "HELP!". You are suddenly awakened, startled by this. You realize it was merely a dream, but this is the second time you've heard that voice - the first being just before your arrival in the Pokémon world, with a request for help for the Pokémon world as a whole. You've been here for a while, though, and nothing's led you anywhere as to your purpose in coming. All you've got to go on is a fleeting image of the Pokémon crying for help (Munna) who was being chased by a Hydreigon. Heck, she might not even be alive right now.

Knowing there's little you can do about this, however, you simply try to keep yourself sane and do more rescues.

After another filler day, as you exit your home, you'll end up meeting with Dunsparce outside. There seems to be a mirage visible from the hills in Post Town - you follow him and check it out. If you look carefully in the distance, you can see it - a bunch of mountains floating in the sky, completely detached from the ground. According to Virizion, this is the Great Glacier, found further in the north. (Obviously, it's a mirage. Global-warming has not progressed that much in either world right now.) There are many rumors as to what the Glacier may contain - jewels, the Great Crystal... - but mere rumors, no proof, because no one has successfully gone to and from the Great Glacier's depths. The crevasses change at random, too, making the place unmappable. Of course, you could always just use a Flying Pokémon, but the winds there just push them back.

Your partner then vows that he will become stronger so he can head to the Great Glacier. Other than this, though, it's another filler day. I will note that, back in town, Cinccino and Cofagrigus have their shops opened. Cinccino mostly will make various Pokémon Gifts for you - items that greatly boost recruitment rates if you give them to specific Pokémon, usually unevolved. Cofagrigus will take any Gold Bar you find in a dungeon and trade it for items or 555 Poké. Take your pick, I suppose.

Soon, you'll unlock Companion Mode and Local Wireless Play from the X Button menu - I'm not sure if this coincided with my Silver Rank promotion or just filling in the filler day. Companion Mode will basically allow you to play as someone not on an adventure, whereas the Wireless option allows you to connect to another player's 3DS (also needs Gates to Infinity) to complete jobs together. Beyond this announcement from HAPPI, though, it's another filler day.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

That night, you watch as a Pokémon runs panting through the woods, obviously either pursuing or fleeing from something. It breaks through the forestry to see your Pokémon Paradise nearby. Of course, you are sound asleep in your bed, having another dream.

Someone is reaching out to you through the dream, asking desperately for you, but the connection is still weak, and you slip off into a dreamless sleep.

You awaken the next morning, obviously in a tired daze. Your concerned partner asks what is going on. Eventually, you decide to the spill the beans - how you came here and the dreams. Your partner thinks that this Pokémon is trying to communicate with you via telepathy. But isn't telepathy usually crystal clear, being right in your head and all? Your partner has a solution to this paradox as well - something's getting the way, either a lack of telepathic skill on one of your parts, or perhaps the Pokémon's getting closer to you.

Still, as your partner admits, we still can't do much.

So, exit the house and you'll see a Pelipper flying by with some notices from HAPPI, concerning a suspicious Pokémon nearby Post Town, stay inside, etc., etc. But isn't that typical for Post Town - I mean, Gurdurr and Scraggy, back in the day... HAPPI must be really concerned, then. Head on down to Post Town. As you do, Quagsire hands over money to give to Swanna. Well, whatever. Continue on into town.

There, you find no one - no shopkeeps, no Pokémon, not even the diligent Kecleon. Well, okay - head into the inn (it's due west of the Kecleon shop).

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

Inside, Swanna thanks you for the money, and takes note that Pokémon are getting really tense in their interrelations and fighting all of the time. Herdier blames it on the loss of the Rainbows of Hope, but Rufflet notes that this is not merely a localized occurence - 'round the world, Pokémon are losing hope, drifting into despair, becoming more isolated and less trusting. This can only lead to something bad, something dreadful...

Outside, your partner remains fairly unfazed by this whole "doom and gloom" attitude around here. You think different, that your partner is simply bottling up his emotions. Then again, your partner HAS always been positive and open-minded - maybe you're just overthinking this.

Well, for now, today's another filler day. Just note that Post Town is pretty much unusable for the time being, so shopping is stuck at Quagsire's. Additionally, note that the Challenge Board should now be open. It is to the left of the Request Board. There, you and you alone will go, although you can bring more by connecting with another person's Gates to Infinity cartridge. These jobs are, as I recall, simply in one-floor dungeons and contain strong Pokémon to defeat. You can even fight legendary Pokémon later on! So, anyways, fill out the filler day.

The next morning, you awaken, realizing you didn't have any dreams the previous evening. Your partner remains upbeat, saying they'll come in due time. Meanwhile, outside, you meet up with the enthusiastic Dunsparce and Emolga. Meanwhile, Leavanny and Lillipup come up, requesting your help in finding Leavanny's son, Swadloon. Lillipup thinks Swadloon may have gone to Breezy Meadow or Inflora Forest. Your partner decides that, since Inflora Forest is more dangerous, we'll check there first while Leavanny and Lillipup deal with the other.

So, prepare for your trip, then head via the crossroads into Inflora Forest.





Inflora Forest



  • Dungeon Length: 8 floors + end (9F)
  • Dominant Types: Grass, Poison, and Flying are tied, winning by a very slight margin each
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 2F ~ 8F
Blitzle #522 Electric 2F ~ 8F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 2F ~ 8F
Cottonee #546 Grass 2F ~ 8F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 2F ~ 8F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 2F ~ 8F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 2F ~ 8F
Swinub #220 Ground 2F ~ 8F

  • Archen is weak to Steel, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Bug, Flying, Fire, Ice, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Blitzle is weak to Ground, and is advantageous over Flying and Water.
  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Cottonee is weak to Ice, Fire, Flying, Poison, and Bug, and has advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock.
  • Croagunk is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying, and is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Grass, Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Litwick is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Steel, Grass, and Bug.
  • Swinub is weak to Grass, Water, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Poison, Electric, Fire, Rock, and Steel.

In case that the bushes are random...

When I was writing this portion of the walkthrough, I encountered a yellow-flowered bush upon my entrance to the dungeon, on 1F - the game will directly point it out to you. In the open/gridless area, you'll want to find the exit matching that bush. I personally found the yellow-flowered bush and used it, but, if it's random, just match it up with your own.

The first floor is just one of those open, gridless areas. It has no real purpose, either, so just head north to 2F, where the traditional dungeon floors begin.

Once you reach 3F, you'll find a fairly open, gridless floor again. There are three paths exiting this area - two in the southwest corner, and one in the northwest. Use this northwestern one. Why? Well, I'm pretty sure that the initial entrance on 1F had a bush just like that - yellow flowers - so that has to be significant, especially the way it was pointed out. 4F will be another traditional floor.

Once you reach 5F, you'll see that Swadloon is in a different, darker area. You'll also notice the panting Pokémon running through the woods again. Meanwhile, Swadloon is looking for "something good". The Pokémon in the forest slows down as it approaches the clearing... Swadloon notices the pile of dirt nearby and examines it... The unknown Pokémon approaches... Swadloon finds a ruby... The unknown Pokémon gets closer... Well, anyways, 5F is another traditional dungeon floor.

6F is another one of those open, gridless floors. I will note that Pokémon do exist on this floor, like on 3F. You'll probably also find a shiny tile somewhere nearby (I found one due west of the entrance, which contained a Blast Seed and one south of the entrance with an Oran Berry). Like before, you'll probably want to find the exit with the yellow-flowered bush. That should be the northwesternmost exit, west of the entrance. Anyways, 7F and 8F are traditional dungeon floors as well.

Once you hit 9F, you'll find the clearing where Swadloon is. He is greatly scared by your presence and admits that this is far from the first time he's been here. Eventually, Swadloon realizes his wrong in coming here while a suspicious Pokémon is about, and they all leave safely.





A Suspicious Pokémon...



Back in town, Leavanny and Lillipup and Swadloon have a tearful reunion as Swadloon gives his mother the ruby as a birthday present. You are thanked for your effort with a Power Manual, a Blue Key, and 500 Poké. Well, that's better than what our other rescues insofar have given us! As the scene fades, you wonder about the nature of family and friends, and why your partner's family isn't around. (I must note that this is also the first time anything like that has been asked in the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series, although it's a prevalent element.) Anywho, save.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

Later that night, your partner is unable to sleep for whatever reason. He decides to get all chatty with you. Seeing Leavanny and Swadloon that afternoon made him wonder about your own family - in your world, the human world, you probably have friends and family. He asks you how they're probably feeling, even though you're gone.

Your partner doesn't have anyone like that - parents, siblings, obviously children, friends... He's been alone for pretty much all of his life. Pokémon just don't trust each other; always pick fights; always backstab... He thinks himself almost like Virizion was before she joined the team, but with one key difference - he didn't lose the ability to trust. He kept looking for true, trustworthy friends - Virizion was happy to be just off by herself.

He thanks you for being that one friend he could really trust with him and his dream of a paradise for all. That's why he's been so positive ever since you met him - he's enjoyed every single day since the two of you met that fateful day when you fell from the sky...

Meanwhile, the scene ends with a vision of a Pokémon lurching into, then collapsing in the Post Town square...

The morning after, head on outside and you'll be met by Emolga. He has some news for you - the suspicious Pokémon HAPPI warned about is in the town! However, he collapsed on the way inn, and is being cared for in the inn (after all, we don't know if he's the suspicious Pokémon or not). ... Well, if anything, he's new to town. Well, Emolga's gonna get the team together - you should head to the inn in Post Town.

There, you'll push your way through the crowd and to the inn's top floor. There, you'll find Gurdurr steaming over the "suspicious Pokémon" - a black fox-like Pokémon we all know as Umbreon. Gurdurr is eventually restrained verbally by Swanna in benefit of the doubt. Emolga, Virizion, and Dunsparce come up as you get caught up on the situation. It seems that Virizion knows Umbreon, though, and is quite worried. There's nothing to worry about, though - his injuries are minor, and he's just very exhausted.

Virizion elaborates on Umbreon. Umbreon (well, this one) researches the Mystery Dungeons, primarily, among other arcane things. His pride was centered around the Great Glacier, though. Umbreon was not alone, however, in his research - there was his partner, Espeon. This leaves more questions than answers, however, but we will have to wait until Umbreon recovers. So, for now, filler day.

NEW DUNGEONS!

While at the crossroads earlier, you'll have learned that two new dungeons have opened up - the Breezy Meadow and Tempting Path. I linked to these sections, so feel free to visit them when you wish. (You couldn't visit them before going to Post Town, which is why I waited on this.)


WEATHER?

Around this time - I first found it in Breezy Meadow - the weather can change in a dungeon. Insofar, the dungeons have always been of "Clear" weather, and your HP healed whilst walking, correct? It's not that simple anymore.

Now, weather can change. This can give benefits to certain types and, if the weather is not Clear, then no Pokémon - NONE - will be able to heal HP while walking. These changes in weather can be brought about at random, by moves (e.g. Sunny Day, Rain Dance, Sandstorm, Hail), or Orbs (e.g. Sunny Orb, Rainy Orb, Sandy Orb, Hail Orb). As well as triggering the effects of certain abilities and items, these remain constant:

  • When it is Sunny, the power of Fire moves increases and the power of Water moves decreases. SolarBeam also can be used instantly.
  • When it is Rainy, the power of Water moves increases and the power of Fire moves decreases. The move Thunder is also 100% accurate.
  • When it is Sandstorming, all but Ground-, Rock-, and Steel-type Pokémon receive damage every few turns.
  • When it is Hailing, all but Ice-type Pokémon receive damage every few turns. The move Blizzard is also 100% accurate.





Breezy Meadow



  • Dungeon Length: 8 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass and Poison
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 8F
Blitzle #522 Electric 1F ~ 8F
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 8F
Cottonee #546 Grass 1F ~ 8F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 8F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 8F
Landorus #645 Ground/Flying 8F (post-credits!)
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 8F
Swinub #220 Ground 1F ~ 8F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 8F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 8F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 8F

JUST TO MAKE IT CLEAR...

... Landorus is not going to be available in this dungeon until after you beat the game. If you're one of those that were just following the walkthrough when you got to see this, sorry, you're screwed for now. You can see the section Random Finds (within the Hunting the Legends! section) for more details. Anyways, I doubt you'd want to fight him this early - he's Level 70. =P

  • Archen is weak to Steel, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Bug, Flying, Fire, Ice, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Blitzle is weak to Ground, and is advantageous over Flying and Water.
  • Cottonee and Whimsicott are weak to Ice, Fire, Flying, Poison, and Bug, and have advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock.
  • Croagunk is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying, and is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Grass, Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Litwick and Chandelure are weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Water, and Ground, and take little damage from Fighting and Normal. They are advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Steel, Grass, and Bug.
  • Swinub is weak to Grass, Water, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Poison, Electric, Fire, Rock, and Steel.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.




Tempting Path



  • Dungeon Length: 9 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass, Poison, and Flying are tied, winning by a very slight margin each
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 9F
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 9F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 9F
Sandile #551 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 9F
Swinub #220 Ground 1F ~ 9F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 9F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 9F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 9F

  • Foongus is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Grass, Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground. I will note that, like in the mainstream Pokémon Black/White Versions, it is a nice idea to recruit this if you don't have Oshawott in your party, to help provide an even better balance of Pokémon coverage.
  • Sandile is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic and Electric. It is advantageous over Poison, Rock, Steel, Electric, Fire, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Swinub is weak to Grass, Water, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Poison, Electric, Fire, Rock, and Steel.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Whimsicott is weak to Ice, Fire, Flying, Poison, and Bug, and has advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock.




Umbreon and the Magnagate



Some Info You Might Want

Just scroll above the header for Breezy Meadow for it. It is fairly important.

One filler day after seeing Umbreon, when you exit the house, one of the Timburr will run up to you, notifying you that Umbreon's back in (relatively) good health, although he says he needs to leave Post Town immediately. He refuses to listen to anyone, too, so Timburr was told to get you.

At the inn, we see Umbreon trying to walk out of the inn in obvious pain. It must be an important reason, too - but what that reason is is the main the question. As Umbreon claims, he is being pursued and attacked by some strange Pokémon - not just him, but Espeon as well. Of course, there had to be a reason for this, and this reason would be the Entercards. See, Mystery Dungeons themselves, despite all of their randomness and virtually infinite permutations, they will have patterns, for they are only virtually infinite. To use this eventual regularity to one's advantage, that's what Entercards are for. Before we can figure out how this is so, everyone falls asleep. >_<

Anyways, Umbreon decides it is better to show by example. He does this and makes a Magnagate appear - a link to a dungeon. It takes four Entercards to make the link to a dungeon complete, and that's why Umbreon and Espeon were attacked - because each Pokémon has two of the Entercards to a particularly special dungeon no one has likely ever entered. That quickly leads to a consensus - you will go save Espeon!

Prepare for your dungeon excursion, then head to the crossroads and to the Crags of Lament.





Crags of Lament



  • Dungeon Length: 9 floors + end (10F)
  • Dominant Types: Ground, winning by a very slight margin
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 1F ~ 9F
Purugly #432 Normal 10F (boss)
Swinub #220 Ground 1F ~ 9F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 9F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting 10F (boss)
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 9F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 9F

  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Poison, Electric, Steel, and Ice.
  • Swinub is weak to Grass, Water, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Poison, Electric, Fire, Rock, and Steel.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Whimsicott is weak to Ice, Fire, Flying, Poison, and Bug, and has advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock.

There's not a lot to mention about this particular dungeon. You'll see a scene involving Espeon after 3F. There's also a breather floor between 5F and 6F.

Once on 10F, you'll watch as Espeon runs into a dead-end, still tailed by a Purugly and a Toxicroak. As Espeon gets cornered and threatened with death if she fails to hand over the Entercards, Purugly rushes her and pilfers through her Bag, finding ... nothing!? As the one-sided fight is ready to break out, your partner screams for them to cease their efforts. Seems like we're just in time! As you exchange words with Purugly and Toxicroak, Espeon walks behind the rock nearby. Meanwhile, we fight!

BOSS (10F): Purugly and Toxicroak

  • Purugly is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages. Little to say about this one, except that it is really resilient.
  • Toxicroak is weak to Psychic (4x), Flying, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark. Toxicroak is mainly notable for using Revenge - it's a move like Bide that transfers damage dealt to it back to one of your allies, but doubled. This easily one-hit kills. Sadly, there's no real way to prevent the damage ... unless you actually use the Tactics from the status menu to tell everyone to get away!

In all honesty, there's nothing special about this fight. Odds are, it's already 4-on-2, and you should obviously have Virizion with you. If you can limit her moves to simply Double Kick or another Fighting move, then that pretty much takes out Purugly quite readily. Toxicroak is a bit harder to deal with. The only way you could likely get a type advantage over him by now, barring a recruit and grinding, is via TMs. If you have someone with Aerial Ace, for example, that's great!

Of course, items can also be helpful here - Petrify Orbs, Foe-Hold Orbs, Stun Seeds, Blast Seeds... Pretty much any kind of item that inflicts petrification, paralysis, or confusion will be immensely helpful. If you're really having trouble, I would suggest grinding, bringing along more Reviver Seeds, or using some Violent Seeds and Vile Seeds - these last two can put you at a huge advantage in any fight. But, again, there's not much worth note in this fight.

After the battle, the weary baddies flee and Espeon, also weak, comes out from behind the rock. It seems she's okay. She requests to go to Post Town, and your partner agrees.

Be sure to save!



The Great Expedition




Sectional Flowchart








Umbreon and Espeon's Dream Fulfilled! But...




Umbreon and Espeon have a heartfelt reunion back in the Post Town square. After thanking everyone, they ponder on who really attacked them and why. Espeon confirms that they were definitely after the Entercards - as for why, Umbreon posits that it was either they wanted to interfere with the research, or...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

... go to the Great Glacier themselves! Yeah, that's right. The Entercards Umbreon and Espeon hold are designed to take them to the untraversed, dangerous dungeon the Great Glacier, the dungeon Umbreon and Espeon have dedicated their very lives to researching. For, deep within, is the Great Crystal - a crystal that emits energy in the form of some kind of dark matter that creates antigravity, causing the "mirage" to float in the air. (I know got a bit scientific there, but it makes sense.)

The Entercards are to be used to bypass the unnavigable crevasses around the glacier to stick you right next to the dungeon itself.

'Course, Espeon didn't have her Entercards, as you'll recall. They weren't stolen, but merely given to someone else. If you'll recall, back in Inflora Forest, Swadloon found TWO things. One was the ruby he gave to his mother, Leavanny. He also found two card-like things - the Entercards. To elaborate, when Espeon was separated from Umbreon, she, too, kept trying to reach Post Town, but her pursuers were one step ahead, again, and again, and again. Eventually, she decided to bury the Entercards so they couldn't be stolen from her. But she worried over them and kept checking the hidey-hole back in Inflora Forest. Once, she met Swadloon there, literally right next to the dirt pile she buried them in. (That's where the cutscene from back then cut off.)

Espeon knew her pursuers were following her, always, and she was desperate. She decided to sort of leave the Entercards in Swadloon's care - after all, all he wanted was the red ruby, which she gladly forfeited. She made him carry around the Entercards, too - telling no one until she returned for them. As the bushes nearby rustled (as you, your partner, and the remainder of your party came), Espeon was scared into fleeing once more.

And so, we find Espeon's mistake - Swadloon's life could've been taken, just like that, in lieu of hers in her desperation. She realized this too late and found Swadloon gone upon her return. Yet, Swadloon nor Leavanny mind. They understand she was desperate, and at least she continued to keep care for Swadloon in her heart. And Swadloon even kept the promise, and remained completely safe in the interim.

Anyways, sorry about that long bit. Umbreon and Espeon decide to stay in Post Town a bit longer to deter their attackers while they recover.

Later that evening, back at home, you and your partner converse about the events of the day. Your partner suggests that you, he, and the team help out with Umbreon and Espeon's research, to which you heartily agree.

The next morning, as you exit your house, your partner reminds you to go to the inn in Post Town and speak with Espeon and Umbreon. Well, go ahead and do so. They should be on the top floor, although it seems they're not here... Go speak with Swanna and it seems they've gone to the hill. Simply go east back outside, then up the stairs twice - you know, to where you saw the Magnagate open. There, you find the two and Virizion catching up.

You let loose with your offer to help them and they briefly whisper together, leading your partner to think something bad's gonna be said. But it's quite the opposite - Umbreon and Espeon want to join your team! They also would like it if you would go to the Great Glacier when it is opened up later, when they complete the Entercards. ... ... Well, it seems we have some eavesdroppers! So, in short, you and your partner heartily accept the offer, and Umbreon and Espeon join your team. (See the linked-to sections for more info. And, no, I tried to play the "No, don't join!" joke. Darn!) Still, you won't be getting the two to join for any rescue requests or anything for a while.

So, for now, do a filler day.

After that evening's interesting cutscene, head on outside and you'll meet up with Quagsire. He's decided to hold a meeting based on a technicality in the HAPPI's laws. Basically, if everyone goes to the Great Glacier expedition as they hope to, no one will be left to guard the Paradise or be contacted by HAPPI for whatever reason. If we don't follow it, then our Team Badges lose all of their power and your team is disbanded. o_o; Yeah, we better leave someone behind...

After Victini's usual stint (to quote Scraggy - "Dude, you're so annoying--"), we gotta decide. Scraggy thinks it oughta be the weakest member, as does Gurdurr, which causes concern for Dunsparce. It becomes a growing concern for him, too. Eventually he can only stutter out a few syllables before even Emolga gets scared for him. Then, suddenly, Virizion opts to stay behind! Quite obviously, everyone is surprised. (Not to mention me - she's a main member of my team! T_T) She comes up with some crappy excuse about not liking the cold or danger, but we all know why. (Well, you, me, Emolga, and Dunsparce. Everyone else just drools happily.)

Well, we gotta tell Umbreon and Espeon the news as well. Head to the hill in Post Town; Emolga and Dunsparce will meet you there. Umbreon and Espeon, yet to be blindsided, say that they should have the Entercards ready on the morrow. The news is finally delivered, though, and they're startled, but not for the reasons you think...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

As we all know, Virizion is not the type to make friends, as prior events indicated quite well. The main reason for this goes farther back than the superificial "world is rough" philosophy. Back in the day, she used to have a friend - Keldeo, the fourth member of the Musketeer "trio". Like D'Artagnan, if you've ever read "The Three Musketeers". (You should. It's good.)

Random crap aside, Keldeo once did go to the Great Glacier, yet he was one of the many who never did return. Virizion searched rigorously for him, but couldn't find a trace of him. Eventually, she got a letter from him...

"The truth is that I never even intended to go to the Great Glacier. I just wanted an excuse to get away from you. We aren't friends anymore. Just forget about me."

Obviously, she was absolutely crushed and, her emotions jumbled, she began to distrust all who she met, for fear of meeting that same feeling of dark, dreadful despair ever again. Virizion eventually then met up with Umbreon and Espeon (who she had not met yet) and requested to be taken to the Great Glacier, still having not given up on Keldeo.

Anyways, Umbreon angrily insists that she go, even if he must drag her himself.

Back at the house, the four of you discuss what's next. Emolga is definitely angered at the cause of Virizion's initial cold-heartedness, even if he didn't like her himself. Meanwhile, Dunsparce wonders if Virizion's refusal to go was because of that talk they had the night before, perhaps to give him a chance to prove himself. Eventually, Dunsparce voices his opinion... Umbreon is right and Virizion should go, and, in her stead -- but Emolga interrupts him, knowing what he'll say. Eventually, your partner decides that there is no good way to do this - you won't feel right, no matter who stays.

Emolga suggests, then, we all draw straws. How cliché, but I suppose it'll work. Emolga will get it all ready the next morning. For now, then, just go do something from one of the bulletin boards.

Save in the interim between that day and the evening. After chatting with your partner, who soon falls asleep, you ponder the nature of that rule stating someone must be left behind, and how it and your dreams overlap. Perhaps you're the one that needs to stay - after all, if you have a dream in the next few days saying that you should do something, wouldn't you need to focus on that, not delving deeper into an icy labyrinth? You settle on trying to volunteer to stay tomorrow.

The next morning, head outside to meet up with Emolga and Virizion and Dunsparce. Virizion will already state the obvious. Despite this, everyone takes their slip of paper - the one with the red dot will be the one to stay behind... And Dunsparce is the one who stays. Suddenly, you object, then Virizion, then your partner, then it all gets out of hand until Dunsparce angrily screams it - he will stay. He is admittedly disappointed, but he understands it was fair, so he'll stay.

Go ahead and prepare for the expedition, then head to the hill where Espeon and Umbreon are. (Weird as it sounds, don't prepare anything for Emolga's coming if you're bringing him. Trust me on this.) It seems that the Entercards are ready. Speak with Umbreon when you're really sure you want to go - you really need to be stocked up, as it'll be a fairly long set of dungeons from here on out. Confirm this once more, turn up the 3D, and watch joyfully as Umbreon and Espeon summon a Magnagate.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

The two of them go on ahead for scientific "nerd" stuff. Meanwhile, you and your chosen team are left behind to do as you will - say good-bye and stuff. As you and your team bid farewell to Dunsparce especially, tears begin to well up in his eyes. He planned to see you all off with a smile, but we all know he desperately wanted to come, to prove himself to all. Emolga suddenly pushes his way out of the Magnagate and shoves Dunsparce into it, just as the party is whisked away and the Magnagate closes, setting in stone Emolga's decision to stay behind.

... *sniffle* Save already. *sniffle*





On The Other Side...



On the other side of the Magnagate, we find ourselves in a pitch-black cave - nothing is visible. All we can hear are voices. Suddenly, they hear Espeon and Umbreon further ahead and approach them in a lighted clearing. There, the group laments on Emolga's decision to remain behind, but, as Dunsparce points out, we have to look ahead, not behind. Further ahead, we find the entrance to the first of the next, long series of dungeons: the Telluric Path. It seems all is as predicted - the Mystery Dungeon the Umbreon and Espeon team planned to make has appeared, and it's gonna be a hectic one.

Meanwhile, your partner ponders on the chance of Umbreon and Espeon's pursuers following them even here. But they dismiss this by saying that each dungeon is tied to only one set of Entercards - they'd have to come with us or steal our Entercards to get here. Anyways, we should be near the Great Glacier after this dungeon, so we decide to split into two groups. So, who to pick?

Well, basically, you have six Pokémon - you, your partner, Virizion, Dunsparce, Umbreon, and Espeon. Pick who you want for the parties. You will only deal with your party, so you know, so it'll be ideal to pick four strong Pokémon for your party that cover many type advantages. Dunsparce is obviously out of it, only being around Level 7 if you've yet to actually use him as I have. I personally formed a party of Pikachu (me), Snivy (my partner), Espeon, and Umbreon. Pick as you will however - you can do this at the entrance of the dungeon ahead. Also note the Deposit Box near the entrance.





Telluric Path



  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 10F (detours)
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 10F
Sandile #551 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 10F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 10F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 10F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 10F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. He'll only appear on the floors with detours, but I can say from experience that you do NOT want to bother with said detour any longer than you have to, because these powerful jerks will come quickly and come hard.
  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Sandile is weak to Water, Ice, Grass, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It is advantageous over Electric, Poison, Fire, Rock, Steel, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Swoobat is weak to Ghost, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Grass, and Bug.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Whimsicott is weak to Ice, Fire, Flying, Poison, and Bug, and has advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock.





A Cold, Frozen Wasteland



After the dungeon, you'll find yourself in the frozen wasteland near the base of the Great Glacier. The Great Glacier... The enigma of a mountain swirled around by frosty winds and quaking, ever-changing crevasses for millennia, in the center of which we can find the mysterious Great Crystal that exudes such powerful antigravity as to be able to lift a whole mountain. And, opposite the mountain, you find the many, many crevasses and smaller glaciers. And so it is - we have done what all thought impossible - we are now within reach of the Great Glacier! But, indubitably, this shall be only the first of many more trials.

For now, we bask in the magnificent intelligence and forethought Umbreon and Espeon put into their Entercards and Magnagate dungeon. Well, then, time for the next dungeon! Prepare yourself head ever further northward into the Great Glacier!

Man, I am loving all of this wintry, orchestral music! ^_^





Great Glacier



  • Dungeon Length: 14 floors
  • Dominant Types: Ghost, by a slight margin
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 14F (detours); 9F ~ 14F
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 14F
Cubchoo #613 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 14F
Trubbish #568 Poison 1F ~ 14F
Yamask #562 Ghost 1F ~ 14F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. He'll only appear on the floors with detours (at least initially, but it later becomes a rare, but possible find), but I can say from experience that you do NOT want to bother with said detour any longer than you have to, because these powerful jerks will come quickly and come hard.
  • Chandelure is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Steel, Bug, and Grass.
  • Cubchoo is weak to Fire, Fighting, Steel, and Rock. It is advantageous over Flying, Ground, and Grass.
  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Trubbish is weak to Ground and Psychic, and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Yamask is weak to Ghost and Dark, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It has an advantage over Psychic and Ghost.

There's little of note in this dungeon, much like the Telluric Path. I will note that it may being to Hail here, though. This will stop every Pokémon's "heal HP while walking" thingamajig and also damage all but Ice-types (i.e. everyone in this instance except Cubchoo) for 1 point of damage every few turns.

Be sure to save when you're done!





The Remains of a Magnagate...?



Past the glacial plains, we find ourselves staring into the face of the center of the glacier itself. It's so close that we can pick out the finer details - the clarity of the ice, almost like glass... It's so mysterious. We're close to the end of the expedition now. Meanwhile, though, it looks like something is troubling Virizion - the labyrinth of crevasses extends even to here. Agh, so close to the end.

But, suddenly, you walk off to the east. You see a faint, circular mark in the ground - the mark of a Magnagate! But how? Wasn't no one supposed to have gotten even this far before, and no one by Magnagate? Your partner and the others approach you, concerned about your staring off into space like that. You point out the Magnagate's emblem on the ground and, according to Espeon and Umbreon, this mark is quite, quite old.

It also seems that fairly standard Entercards were used as well, meaning that we can cross this Magnagate as well! Espeon and Umbreon summon the Magnagate, triggering a bright light show, almost acting as if spotlights heading towards the mountain. The meaning of this is unclear, but the party is set on one thing - someone used this before, possible with Entercards or similar entities, and used to go to straight to the Great Glacier! Well, there's nothing to do but see where it leads, and so, almost as the Magnagate fades, the party of six leaps into the shining light.

Be sure to save!

On the other side, you'll find a structure akin to the Telluric Path. This is actually the Glacial Underpass, your next dungeon. Prepare as you would for the Telluric Path (as before, you will have nothing to do with the "spare" party) and go north into the dungeon.





Glacial Underpass



  • Dungeon Length: 9 floors
  • Dominant Types: Ice, by a very slight margin
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Cubchoo #613 Ice B1F ~ B9F
Panpour #515 Water B1F ~ B9F
Piloswine #221 Ground/Ice B1F ~ B9F
Trubbish #570 Poison B1F ~ B9F
Zorua #570 Dark B1F ~ B9F

  • Cubchoo is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and has type-based advantages over Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric and is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Piloswine is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Fire, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type advantages over Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, Poison, Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Trubbish is weak to Ground and Psychic and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Zorua is weak to Fighting and Bug, takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic. Note that Zorua does retain its Illusion ability, therefore meaning that you'll be unlikely to see a Zorua until you attack its disguised form, which looks like a different Pokémon.

Save on your way out! Yeah, just a generic filler dungeon; nothing special to see here.





Within the Glacier



On the other side of our third straight dungeon, we find ourselves staring breathlessly at a beautiful, enormous crystal structure. It is obvious that we've come a fair way into the Great Glacier itself, and that only adds to the mysterious magnificence of this geographical feature, for sunlight is still pouring in through the translucent ice. Perhaps within the crystalline ice palace ahead is the Great Crystal?

Well, anyways, prepare yourself at the Deposit Box for the next dungeon. Once you're ready, go to the east and enter the dungeon.





Glacier Palace



  • Dungeon Length: 13 floors + end (14F)
  • Dominant Types: Water, Ground, and Dark are each tied for a very slight lead
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Cryogonal #615 Ice 14F (boss)
Golurk #623 Ground/Ghost 14F (boss)
Palpitoad #536 Water/Ground 1F ~ 13F
Pawniard #624 Dark/Steel 1F ~ 13F
Piloswine #221 Ice/Ground 1F ~ 13F
Tirtouga #564 Water/Rock 1F ~ 13F
Zorua #570 Dark 1F ~ 13F

  • Palpitoad is weak to Grass (4x) only, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Pawniard is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting (4x). It will take little damage from Psychic and Poison, It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.
  • Piloswine is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Fire, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type advantages over Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, Poison, Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Tirtouga is weak to Grass (4x), Fighting, Electric, and Ground. It is advantageous over Fire, Ground, Rock, Flying, Bug, and Ice.
  • Zorua is weak to Fighting and Bug, takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic. Note that Zorua does retain its Illusion ability, therefore meaning that you'll be unlikely to see a Zorua until you attack its disguised form, which looks like a different Pokémon.

The first floor, 1F, is one of the open, gridless area. Still, all you pretty much get to do is proceed to the right (northeast) along the path and through the archway to the next floor, a traditional dungeon floor.

It remains so until 6F. 6F is basically a reverse of 1F - this time, move left. From there on out, like before, it's a fair few traditional dungeon floors.

After beating 8F, you'll reach a small clearing. There, Dunsparce is working hard to catch up, apparently having trouble breathing. Soon, everyone else begins to notice it, too. It might be an altitude thing - I mean, the Great Glacier is a mountain, right? This problem is pushed aside for the moment as Umbreon points out his discovery - floating ice crystals (and other things)! So, something must be here causing the antigravity, and the Great Crystal is therefore much more likely to exist!

Also nearby are "Frisms" - special, rare refractive treasures that are capable of trapping even sound. We agree to take six, one for each of us, leaving some for future explorers. Meanwhile, Virizion wanders off to a nearby frozen Frism. Dunsparce and the others come by and they decide to warm it up - it contains the voice of a Pokémon that came thus far into the Glacier! But it is also apparent from Virizion's reaction that she knows this voice - the voice ...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

... of Keldeo!

But didn't he say in his letter to Virizion that he never even came to the Glacier? Perhaps it was a fake letter, then? Virizion dismisses this theory, saying that Keldeo indeed wrote the letter - the handwriting (well, hoofwriting) is his. So, then, Keldeo probably turned after recording this message - something up ahead changed him. But what?

Well, more traditional dungeon floors with a musical change! You'll find a breather room between 10F and 11F, so you know. 13F will also progress akin to 1F.

Once you pass 13F, you and the rest of the party will suddenly find themselves in a pitch-black area, stuck with some kind of noise, like something being dragged. Suddenly, a roar echoes around the area and light shines in, revealing a Golurk, followed by two Cryogonal. Obviously, they mean to take us captive!

BOSS (14F): Golurk, Cryogonal, and Cryogonal

  • Golurk is weak to Ghost, Dark, Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric, Normal, and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Electric.
  • Cryogonal are weak to Fire, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. They're advantageous over Flying, Grass, and Ground. Additionally, it may have the Levitate ability, immunizing it from Ground damage.

In all honesty, you shouldn't have a problem with this fight. If you've controlled Virizion and Umbreon through the dungeon, you can actually restrict their moves to Fighting or Grass and Dark respectively to really bump up our chances here - Fighting works good against Cryogonal and Dark and Grass are great against Golurk. You can do a similar thing with your own actions and the moves of your partner. Of course, items also will help fairly well - if you have any like Foe-Hold Orbs or Petrify Orbs for mass petrification, consider this won, since you can probably try to gang up on them one at a time. Just try to keep Dunsparce out of the swing of things, in case that he may use up all of your Reviver Seeds!

Also, to note, you cannot control the two allies you didn't take with you through the Palace, so you'll need to help them by throwing items. Overall, though, a quite easy fight.





Kyurem, Lord of the Great Glacier



After the battle, it seems that the Golurk and Cryogonal have fled. Meanwhile, a chill wind blows by, mystifying Umbreon and Espeon - for all their knowledge, it seems they don't grasp the concept of an air current. =/

Well, anyways, looks like there's more to go. As you progress, Dunsparce collapses from exhaustion briefly, emphasizing the lack of oxygen around here - soon, everyone else begins to feel the effects of it...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

... except you for some reason. Quickly, everyone passes out except for you, then the area darkens and a Pokémon drops down violently from above. We all know this Pokémon as Kyurem, the legendary Ice Dragon Pokémon! Frightened and alone, you stand valiant in the face of Kyurem as he Glaciates the nearby airspace.

Afterwards, you find yourself in an ice prison, with everyone slowly coming back to consciousness. Kyurem seems to be a more benign Pokémon than we realize, as it seems it is he who saved us. He is also the master of this Great Glacier. He, however, prohibits you from approaching, for none, not even Kyurem, are allowed to go "there". Kyurem reveals himself also as a prophet, capable of seeing and knowing all.

Kyurem insists that you turn back, knowing you'll never return if you go forward. In return, Umbreon asks a single question: does the Great Crystal reside here? Kyurem affirms Umbreon's beliefs. Virizion also asks a question about Keldeo, but it seems he did not progress past the Frism room of the Palace, meaning you are the first to proceed this far. Suddenly, Kyurem disappears, leaving you a treasure and a command to leave.

As everyone begins to speculate about Keldeo's fate, Virizion stops them, saying it is pointless. No, she has not given up hope, but she has realized something else. Ever since she read the letter from the "cruel Keldeo", she had believed there was no such thing as a true friend. She had blamed Keldeo for her lack of trust all this time, but, in reality, she had only herself to blame. She realizes that now. Virizion still believes that the Keldeo that was her friend is out there, somewhere - and she, too, believes in the ability to trust, thanks to you.

So, anyways, what treasure did Kyurem leave us? It seems we've received a Life Seed, a Protein, five Silver Spikes, a Black Key, a Gold Scope, and, quite notably, 5,000 Poké!

And so, our first big adventure was a great success! ^_^ The team returned to Post Town and told all about their journey....

Well, then, get to saving!



Can Fate Be Changed?




Sectional Flowchart








Emolga, Frisms, and Light Balls



The afternoon after the party - yeah, you celebrated and woke up late - you'll find Emolga outside. He calls out to you, seemingly from behind the house. Then from the left side, then suddenly all around! (Did we eat some strange Berries last night or something?) Suddenly, you seem to have found a solution to this "Emolga Multiplier" problem and run off, without telling your partner a thing - those Frisms! -_-; You eventually walk up to Emolga, who's planting another Frism near your front door. Well, anyways, Emolga turns the tables by thanking you and your partner doesn't have the heart to give Emolga a good ol'-fashioned "punishment".

Meanwhile, Emolga tells you of the balls of light he saw while you were away - not even Herdier has seen anything like it, nor anyone else. Well, whatever - we have to finish off a filler day today. Also note that there are two new dungeons - the Redland Reaches and the Eastern Savanna.





Redland Reaches



  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Cubchoo #613 Ice 1F ~ 10F
Klang #600 Steel 1F ~ 10F
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 10F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 10F
Sandile #511 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 10F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 10F
Trubbish #568 Poison 1F ~ 10F
Venipede #543 Poison/Bug 1F ~ 10F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 10F
Yamask #562 Ghost 1F ~ 10F

  • Cubchoo is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and is advantageous over Ground, Grass, and Flying.
  • Klang is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Steel.
  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic, and has type-based advantages over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric, and has advantages over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Sandile is weak to Ice, Grass, Water, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Poison, Electric, Rock, Steel, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Trubbish is weak to Ground and Psychic, and has an advantage over Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Whimsicott is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Bug, and Poison, and is advantageous over Ground, Rock, and Water.
  • Yamask is weak to Ghost and Dark, and also takes little damage from Normal or Fighting. It has advantages over Psychic and Ghost.




Eastern Savanna



  • Dungeon Length: 14 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Cubchoo #613 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 14F
Piloswine #221 Ground/Ice 1F ~ 14F
Trubbish #570 Poison 1F ~ 14F
Yamask #562 Ghost 1F ~ 14F

  • Cubchoo is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and has type-based advantages over Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic, and has type-based advantages over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric and is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Piloswine is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Fire, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type advantages over Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, Poison, Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Trubbish is weak to Ground and Psychic and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Yamask is weak to Ghost and Dark, and also takes little damage from Normal or Fighting. It has advantages over Psychic and Ghost.




A Dream Turns To Reality



After completing the filler day where Emolga mentioned the light balls while you were gone to the Great Glacier, you'll get to save. That night, you have yourself another dream... It's been a while. Still, not much is able to get through, merely an attempted connection before you drift off into NREM sleep, but the voice is definitely clearer... You tell your partner about this in morning, who believes that the connection is improving and you'll be to learn who this Pokémon is and the team can go help her. Then maybe you'll learn why you came into the Pokémon world.

Outside, though, your partner probably realizes the long-term meaning of this - when your role is done, you'll probably return to your own world of humans... You decide to keep your partner out of the "what's done is done" logic, who thinks you should stay here forever. (That'd be my choice, personally. Still, it's also obvious your partner really wants to hang on to his best friend, too. And you have family... Gah. Forget it.) You hastily accept the offer, not realizing the implications it may have further down the road - I mean, do you even get a choice? Well, at least he's not going to be depressed for a while...

Well, filler day!

The next morning, after exiting your house, you'll meet up with Emolga again - this time face-to-face. It seems one of the lights he mentioned before is now visible from the Post Town hill. You'll head there immediately, and you can see it quite vividly. It's not really moving all that much though, and no one seems to know what it is, but everyone's feeling some odd feeling of dread.

Well, anyways, it's another filler day. You'll save afterwards.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

That evening, you have another dream. This time, the voice is much clearer - you can clearly hear the Pokémon asking if you can hear her. The mystery Pokémon is weary with relief at finally connecting with you, and then its silhouette comes into view - it is the Pokémon that you saw being chased by a Hydreigon before, Munna! She tells you that she is fine for now, but is still being pursued. However, she is growing weaker, and Hydreigon persists in his efforts to find her - and he keeps succeeding.

Munna then reveals a startling fact - it is because of Hydreigon that the very balance of the world has been upset, leading to the world's eventual decimation. Hydreigon knows this, but is too selfish to care - he thinks it has nothing to do with him. Seeing no hope of a Pokémon winning the battle, Munna crossed over to the world of the humans and, in desperation, entered one of their dreams. By chance, it was you. Hydreigon found her before she could finish delivering the message, and thusly, the message was cut short with a reverberating scream for "HELP!".

Munna's been on the run since that night, and is quickly growing weaker. You request to know where she is so you can save her, much to her delight. She reveals that she is at the base of Mount Kilionea, a volcano amidst a forest. Suddenly, Hydreigon finds Munna and the dream is cut short once more.

After the dream that night, you're startled into an awakened state. You successfully recall the details of the dream - Munna, chased by Hydreigon, is now at Mount Kilionea. You realize this is your concern and not that of your partner or the team at all... But then, if Hydreigon is upsetting the balance of the world, then it's everyone's problem.

The next morning, you tell the team of your dream and the associated details - everything since the very beginning when you fell from the sky. (To quote Scraggy: "Dude, that is way messed up, yo!") They accept the truth somewhat reluctantly, but unanimously. We then agree on our goal - to save Munna without dragging Hydreigon back into Post Town. We'll figure out what to do about Hydreigon then.

We also decide that you and your partner alone should handle this. Umbreon and Espeon will get the Entercards set up so we can get to Mount Kilionea quicker. Meanwhile, you prepare the items and such, then go speak to them at the Post Town hill when you're ready. Remember, you're only preparing for you and your partner, so don't bring too many hold items, but do bring a fair few Oran Berries and Max Elixirs and Reviver Seeds, because it can get pretty rough.

At the hill, speak with Umbreon and opt to go save Munna. He does note that the Entercards are a one-way trip, as he won't be coming with you, so you will probably have a long trek home - again, be sure you're ready. Look at the sectional flowchart above the Emolga, Frisms, and Light Balls section just to get a grasp of it - pretty much every other entry from here on out is a dungeon and you won't return to town for a long while. Confirm again and they'll get the Magnagate set up. You'll say your good-byes and get a chance to save...

You'll find yourself at the entrance of another dungeon like the Telluric Path and Glacial Underpass from before. Prepare if you need to at the nearby Deposit Box, then go into the dungeon!





Kilionea Road



  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various (though Dark wins by a slight margin)
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting B1F ~ B10F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon B1F ~ B10F
Palpitoad #536 Water/Ground B1F ~ B10F
Pansear #513 Fire B1F ~ B10F
Pawniard #624 Dark/Steel B1F ~ B10F

  • Conkeldurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Deino is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It will take little damage from Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Dragon.
  • Palpitoad is weak to Grass (4x), and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Pansear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and has advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, and Steel. Like Panpour before, I would recommend recruiting this Pokémon for future perusal as it is almost like a substitute for Tepig if you don't have him.
  • Pawniard is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting (4x). It will take little damage from Psychic and Poison, It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.

NOTE!

This is the first dungeon in which you'll meet with Monster Houses. These are often-small rooms that contain good treasure. When you enter, a swathe of enemies will come down and attack you. Your best bet when dealing with any of these, no matter the dungeon, is to use room-wide items, like Foe-Hold Orbs first to get the enemy weakened, so that you can take 'em on one by one. You could also use multi-target moves like Thunderbolt to help. Generally keeping lots of healing items on hand will help as well.

If anything, a Spurn Orb will get those Pokémon outta there.

Additionally, from now on, I wholly recommend saving Team Attacks solely for desperate situations such as this. It won't be as effective in this particular instance, being that you only have two Pokémon with you, but it can still KO most Pokémon!

Other than that, though, it's a fairly basic dungeon. Save on the way out.





Stumbling Around in the Dark



After leaving the Magnagate dungeon, the Kilionea Road, you find yourself in a pitch-black passageway. You feel your way out into a nighttime clearing in the middle of a forest. We decide to just blame it on the manipulation of the ley lines caused by the Entercards. Meanwhile, we should be able to go straight to the base of Mount Kilionea from here.

That also means that Munna and Hydreigon are probably somewhere nearby. Still, it is took dark to start a search, especially when we might accidently be snacked on by Hydreigon or something. You'll just camp in the clearing for the night. As the fire and beds are set up, you come upon the realization that the ley lines may have not been manipulated just twelve hours forward - maybe several days, weeks, or longer, forward or backward. Munna might not be here anymore, or even alive. Worrying is going to get you nowhere, though, so you just decide to call it a night.

That night, you have another dream. It seems Munna is okay and still hiding out at the base of Mount Kilionea, but this is her last hiding hole - if she's caught, well... Suddenly, the dream cuts short without any warning and you're, once more, startled into consciousness. You decide to immediately wake up your partner, who also craps his metaphorical pants. You tell him of the dream and the two of you decide to go for Mount Kilionea immediately.

You'll approach the next dungeon to find it to be a forest. Prepare with the nearby Deposit Box and enter.





Forest of Shadows



  • Dungeon Length: 14 floors
  • Dominant Types: Dark and Dragon by a very slight margin
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Druddigon #621 Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Krokorok #552 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 14F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 14F
Vaporeon #134 Water 1F ~ 14F

  • Archeops is weak to Water, Electric, Ice, and Steel, and takes little damage from Ground. This fossil Pokémon is advantageous over Bug, Ice, Flying, Fire, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Conkeldurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Deino is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It will take little damage from Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Dragon.
  • Druddigon is weak to Dragon and Ice, and has a type-based advantage over Dragon. Note that it may have the Rough Skin ability, causing users of contact moves against this Pokémon to take 25% ~ 33% of their damage dealt in return. Special- and Status-classed moves do not trigger this ability, though, nor do items.
  • Krokorok is weak to Grass, Water, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Pansear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and has advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, and Steel.
  • Vaporeon is weak to Grass and Electric, and has advantages over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

The only real noteworthy thing about this dungeon, beyond the continued Monster House threat, is the possibility for Rain. As you know, hopefully, any weather but "Clear" will prohibit HP restoration while walking. Specifically speaking for Rain, it weakens Fire (Pansear), strengthens Water (Vaporeon), and makes the move Thunder 100% accurate, but you probably don't have that, and neither do your enemies.





IT'S A TRAP!



On the other side of the dungeon, you find the forest shrubbery thinning out to reveal a rocky clearing. Your partner realizes the omnipresent danger of Hydreigon and decides the two of you should whisper from here on out. Munna should be close by though - then again, wouldn't Hydreigon be as well?

As you walk around, Munna pokes her face from behind a rock just to your north, noticing you. She calls you over, and it becomes quickly obvious that she is seriously injured, the cause of which she claims to be Hydreigon. She expresses her gladness at finally meeting you and shrugs off the concern over her wounds for the moment. Hydreigon can't be far away, so we decide to move quickly. As we decide on our destination, Munna says we can't return to the Pokémon Paradise. When asked why...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

... Munna decides to give up the act, saying that you'll be taken down, right here, right now! A swathe of Pokémon appear alongside Munna as light returns to the area, thanks for the Chandelure. It seems it is true - Munna merely led you here to your death. As to why? That's not answered.

Nevertheless, you are in quite a jam, with this being a dozen-or-more to two - we need to run, but the group closes in on us. Your partner then comes up with an idea: aim at the Ghost/Fire-type Chandelure first, dim the lights, and get the heck out of here! The plan succeeds without a hitch, but the minions give chase at Munna's command, quite a haphazard chase I might add.

Well, save. Geez.

You find yourself alone and exhausted at the entrance of another dungeon, with no clue as to how your partner is faring in the pursuit. As you ponder over the nature of this, you hear Toxicroak approaching and decide to enter the next dungeon in desperation. Prepare at the Deposit Box nearby and go inside. Notable inclusions would be room-wide items like Petrify Orbs, healing items like Heal Seeds, Reviver Seeds, and Oran Berry-like items, and stat-influencers like Violent Seeds and Vile Seeds.





Daybreak Ridge



  • Dungeon Length: 6 floors + end (7F)
  • Dominant Types: Dragon
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire 7F (boss)
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 1F ~ 6F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 6F
Druddigon #621 Dragon 1F ~ 6F
Gigalith #526 Rock 7F (boss)
Gothorita #575 Psychic 1F ~ 6F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 6F
Shelgon #372 Dragon 1F ~ 6F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting 7F (boss)

  • Conkeldurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Deino is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It will take little damage from Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Dragon.
  • Druddigon is weak to Dragon and Ice, and has a type-based advantage over Dragon. Note that it may have the Rough Skin ability, causing users of contact moves against this Pokémon to take 25% ~ 33% of their damage dealt in return. Special- and Status-classed moves do not trigger this ability, though, nor do items.
  • Gothorita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Psychic, and advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Pansear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and has advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, and Steel.
  • Shelgon, like Druddigon, is weak to Ice and Dragon, and advantageous over Dragon. However, it is otherwise unnoteworthy.

When it comes to this dungeon, you're not necessarily as screwed as you may think when it comes to being alone. In reality, you're one of the starters, right? (Pikachu, Snivy, Tepig, Oshawott, and Axew.) Of those, Axew is the one who may be the most screwed, yet also the best prepared for this dungeon, being a Dragon-type. Dragon-type moves do super-effective damage to Dragon-types, which makes them a double-edged sword for this dungeon. Snivy is relatively okay, with its only problem being against Pansear. For either of these, you may want to stock a few more Oran Berries and Reviver Seeds, but that's relatively negligible.

I will also note you want to stock up on room-wide Orbs and stuff for the boss. Important inclusions would be stuff like the Foe-Hold Orb or Petrify Orb, a Violent Seed, and the usual healing items. Get those and you should be fine. You can do this in the breather room if you forgot to at the entrance.

Also beware that Monster Houses still can come by! They're not as common as in the previous few dungeons, but they're still a threat, especially with your manpower being halved. Therefore, I would strongly suggest pretty much any item that greatly boosts your power (Violent Seed) in conjunction with multi-target moves (i.e. Thunderbolt), ones that remove the threat entirely (Spurn Orbs, Foe-Hold Orbs, Foe-Fear Orbs), or ones that allow quick escapes (Pure Seeds, Escape Orbs). It's a short dungeon, though, lucky you, so make rigorous use of your moves in any situation.

I will also note that there is a breather floor between 4F and 5F, where you'll find the usual Deposit Box and automatic healing. -_- I swear, I think they tried to make this easy and overdid it.

We'll continue this in the following sub-section, An Unexpected Ally!, for this all basically occurs on 7F of the dungeon.





An Unexpected Ally!



Once you hit 7F in the dungeon, you continue walking on in a tired state of exhaustion ... only to find yourself on a dead-end cliff! There's no hope of bothering to climb down - even if you could, if you fell... Suddenly, Toxicroak comes up from behind with two others from Munna's gang. It seems they've yet to catch your partner, at least, but that doesn't change the fact that they want you gone.

Well, the feeling's mutual!

BOSS (7F): Toxicroak, Gigalith, and Chandelure

  • Toxicroak is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying. It is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark. He also can use the move Mud-Slap (reduces accuracy; super-effective to Electric). Toxicroak is the main boss and will likely get out of a petrification status in two turns, unlike his cohorts, so you may want to target him first.
  • Gigalith is weak to Grass, Fighting, Steel, Ground, and Water. It is advantageous over Flying, Ice, and Bug.
  • Chandelure is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Normal and Fighting. It is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, Bug, Ghost, and Psychic. He can also poison you with Smog, but the status is relatively negligible.

The lucky thing about this fight, I suppose, is that the only Pokémon that has a type-based advantage over your starter Pokémon would be Chandelure if you're using Snivy. Still, regardless, I would hope you have what I recommended you bring. If you do, then you should open up with that Foe-Hold Orb/Petrify Orb and munch on that Violent Seed. If the enemies are still petrified, move towards the one you have an advantage over, if you have such an advantage, and absolutely wreak havoc on his HP bar. You don't really need to get the other enemies to back off if you're using moves that affect nearby targets, like Thunderbolt, but you can always fend them off with a Warp Seed or Spurn Orb if they get to be troublesome. You can also always toss in an All Dodge Orb for yourself to make it hard for you to be hit.

In the end, this becomes more of a battle of items and resilience. Beyond those previously mentioned, you'll also want a swathe of Oran Berries and Reviver Seeds. If it is at the point where you are having trouble taking down that one last Pokémon, throwing a Vile Seed will greatly reduce that Pokémon's likelihood of surviving. Be sure to use your most powerful moves when possible - these guys only have 150 ~ 200 HP each.

(This is all fairly spoilerific, so you know. I didn't box it for readability reasons and some complaints.)

After the battle, the baddies are scattered on the ground, weakened and injured from their metaphorical spanking. Meanwhile, you decide to go ahead and try climbing down the cliff, despite your weariness. Meanwhile, Toxicroak alerts a few Excadrill to your position. As you get ready for a second fight, a loud roar reverberates through the air. A freaking Salamence - one of the rare Dragon Pokémon, and one of the strongest - lands in front of you, and not on the side you want him to be on.

There's no possible way you think you can win - it's already probably a six-on-one fight, and that Salamence alone would probably tear you to pieces. Tie that up with the previous fight wearing you down, and the running you've done through the night. The Excadrill suddenly rush you, pushing you back to the edge of the cliff. Salamence begins to charge up a Hyper Beam, and so you're stuck - fall to your death, or be obliterated by Hyper Beam?

Suddenly, a voice echoes from behind you, telling you to duck. You do so, and an unexpected ally appears: Hydreigon! He flies up and unleashes a powerful Hyper Beam back at Salamence, followed a Dark Pulse at everyone. As you get up, you comprehend the true meaning of this. Hydreigon knocks you over the cliff and catches you as he flies by, letting you flee the otherwise inevitable death.

Go ahead and save. You awaken in a cavern alongside Hydreigon, slightly dazed. Then you realize you're beside Hydreigon and almost make the cave a little damper. Hydreigon hastily apologizes for frightening you. He says he's quite the opposite of what Munna's made him out to be - in fact, he wants to do nothing to harm you. He begs for you to believe him and, given the events on the cliff and this, you calm down and decide to believe him.

It seems you were unconscious for a fair while in the interim between the cliff and now. You're not far from Mount Kilionea, however, although you're in a well-hidden cavern. Hydreigon suddenly comes off a bit of an eccentric, upbeat guy with three heads. This all really begins to confuse you - who was right, Hydreigon or Munna? Well, maybe this is a different Hydreigoon. Who knows? As far as we know, Munna backstabbed you and (a) Hydreigon saved you.

It then comes out that Hydreigon has wanted to meet you for a long time. He claims that you heard his voice back in the human world. ... So, does that mean that the voice that dragged you into the world of Pokémon was actually that of Hydreigon; he was the one actually requesting help for the Pokémon world from a human? We always just assumed it was Munna, since she was being chased in that vision, but... It becomes clear, then - the connection, when it got cut off, Munna began to control Hydreigon's "dream voice" and actually showed you a fake vision. And, in the interim between then and now, Munna and her gang have been impeding you and Hydreigon from meeting.

But why? Hydreigon elaborates, or prepares to, anyways - it seems Salamence is roaring nearby. So, for now, we have to flee!

You'll find yourself at the entrance of another dungeon, in lieu of just flying. (Apparently, Hydreigon's been weary for several days. =/) So, here, you'll basically have Hydreigon join your party as a pseudo-member - basically, he is one, but not one, get me? >_> Anyways, prepare and enter the dungeon before Game Freak logic blows our minds in the real world.

Oh, yeah, data on your new partner while we're at it... Yeah, he's powerful. O_o


HYDREIGON'S STATS
Type Dark/Dragon
Level 64
Max HP 113
Attack 87
Defense 75
Sp. Atk. 64
Sp. Def. 73
EXP. Points ~950,000 now with ~50,000 to next level
Ability Levitate (Ground moves do no damage)
Move #1 DragonBreath (Dragon; hit 10 tiles away)
Move #2 Crunch (Dark; may lower Defense)
Move #3 Tri Attack (Normal; may burn, freeze, or paralyze)
Move #4 Roar (knocks an enemy away, damaging if they hit something)
Weaknesses Fighting, Bug, Dragon, Ice
Resistances Fire, Water, Electric, Grass, Ghost, Dark (all half-damage)
Little Effect Psychic
Advantages Dragon, Psychic, Ghost (from moves)
NOTE: EXP. is merely approximately from later knowledge.




Ochre Quarry



  • Dungeon Length: 13 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Amoonguss #591 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 13F
Dwebble #557 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 13F
Gothorita #575 Psychic 1F ~ 13F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground 1F ~ 13F
Shelgon #372 Dragon 1F ~ 13F
Zebstrika #523 Electric 1F ~ 13F

  • Amoonguss is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.
  • Dwebble is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Gothorita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Seismitoad is weak to Grass (4x) and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.
  • Shelgon is weak to Dragon and Ice and is advantageous over Dragon.
  • Zebstrika is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Lightningrod ability, which can be used to nullify your Electric-type attacks and boost the Zebstrika's Special Attack.

On 1F, you'll find an open gridless area. Pretty much just go northward along the path into the dungeon itself for a few traditional dungeon floors. Something similar will occur on 5F and 13F. The rest is simply unnoteworthy dungeon floors.





Whoa? What!?



Past the Ochre Quarry, it seems that we've been running for a fair while, it being nighttime now. Our pursuers seem to have not followed us, so we decide to stop for the evening. After a shoddy camp is set up in a rock alcove, you stare up at the moon, noticing the similarity to Paradise's stars despite the large distance between here and there. You wonder how everyone in Paradise is doing... If your partner managed to make it there yet and get help...

Hydreigon startles you from your stupor and pretty much reads your mind - he knows you want to go to the Pokémon Paradise again. But first, he asks you to do something - destroy the Bittercold. This goes back to why Hydreigon decided to call someone from the human world for help...








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE BELOW TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








Firstly, Hydreigon reveals that he, too, is not really a Pokémon - merely something in Pokémon form, like you. He is actually the Voice of Life - the voice of all nature, all organic living beings, from the plants to the animals to the Pokémon, a cry for both pain and joy. When the desires of all beings have united, the Voice of Life takes a form - this time, in the form of a Hydreigon.

The world is teetering on the verge of decimation, and all of nature knows it, if but on a subconscious level. The danger causing this is the Bittercold, a mysterious alien organism that has entered the Pokémon world and is eating away at the very core of the planet. Hydreigon then mentions your quest to the Great Glacier, where you saw objects levitating in mid-air, supposedly caused by the antigravity of the Great Crystal. That is actually the power of the Bittercold - and, therefore, the Bittercold is actually within the Great Glacier, within the Glacier Palace to be exact.

Yes, the Great Crystal and the Bittercold are both one and the same.

Hydreigon intends to destroy the Bittercold and therefore save the world. However, there is but one obstacle in his way - Kyurem, lord of the Great Glacier. Kyurem is effectively a prophet, a seer - able to see the distant future. He can know if someone is coming to threaten the Great Crystal, and therefore alter his attitude to deceive that Pokémon, as he did with you. Anyone who sees through his ruse and insists on destroying the Great Crystal, as must be done, will be obliterated mercilessly.

That's why Munna and her gang attacked Umbreon and Espeon, and then you. You are fighting to alter the future Kyurem is perceived, and Munna is a subordinate of Kyurem. Obviously, though, not a single other being wants Kyurem's future - the end of the world - to come to fruition. So, it seems simple, right - train, beat the crap out of Kyurem, and sling a bat at the Great Crystal. Right?

Heh, wrong. The Bittercold is actually the physical manifestation of the negativity of Pokémon - the worsening of relationships, the lack of trust... All that created the Bittercold, which in turn brings about more of it, letting the Bittercold almost suck the life out of the world. Around the Bittercold is a fog made of the pure negative emotions, yet to solidify - if a Pokémon were to enter this fog, the Pokémon would lose all spirit, all strength, almost become unable to even breathe...

Are you starting to realize just how close you were to the Bittercold? Yet, why didn't YOU pass out like the others? That's the root of the reason Hydreigon brought you here - while you may be in the skin of a Pokémon, and have the powers of a Pokémon, you are not a Pokémon, but a human. No Pokémon can destroy the Bittercold because it is the manifestation of negativity in Pokémon, but humans have influence in the Pokémon world whatsoever - a human would be immune to this, like you were on the expedition.

And so, Hydreigon set out a plea for help with through the dreams of humans. One of the humans -- wait, one of? Yes, more than one human answered the call; more than one human is in the Pokémon world as we speak. And, like you, Kyurem is hunting them down mercilessly through Munna and her gang. Right now, the only one of them Hydreigon can depend upon is you. He begs you for your help in defeating Kyurem, destroying the Bittercold, and saving the world.

You're obviously shocked at all of these realizations. You also realize that humans are being ejected from this world left and right, and someone has to stop the Bittercold. And so, you accept Hydreigon's offer, who graciously thanks you.








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE ABOVE TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








After all of that spoilerific cutscene stuff, you get to save the game. On the morrow, you and Hydreigon find a nice shortcut towards Post Town - it's just past the next Mystery Dungeon. It seems that you and Hydreigon came to an agreement last night - you'll return to Post Town and get Umbreon and Espeon to set up the Entercards to get us back as close to Glacier Palace as possible. You still have no idea where your partner is; all you can do is hope he's safe.

Prepare for the next dungeon as necessary, then enter it to the north. Be sure to stock up well on Oran Berries, Reviver Seeds, and Max Elixirs - this dungeon is long at 17 floors!

Please tell me I'm not the only one enjoying this music!





Withered Savanna



  • Dungeon Length: 17 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass, followed by Normal and Poison
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Amoonguss #591 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 17F
Azurill #298 Normal 1F ~ 17F
Glameow #431 Normal 1F ~ 17F
Leafeon #470 Grass 1F ~ 17F
Lilligant #549 Grass 1F ~ 17F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 17F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 17F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground 1F ~ 17F
Simisear #514 Fire 1F ~ 17F
Zebstrika #523 Electric 1F ~ 17F
Zoroark #571 Dark 1F ~ 17F (rare!)

  • Amoonguss is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass. Amoonguss has the Effort Spore ability, so beware of using physical moves on it, as you may be put to sleep, paralyzed, or poisoned. Amoonguss may also hit you with Toxic - a move that inflicts Bad Poisoning. This is like regular Poisoning ... but the damage increases each time!
  • Azurill and Glameow are weak to Fighting and take little damage from Ghost. They lack advantages. Glameow is annoyingly notable for using Hypnosis, which can put you to sleep, and it also has the Limber ability, preventing its paralysis.
  • Lilligant, Leafeon, and Pansage are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. They have type-based advantages over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Seismitoad is weak to Grass (4x), and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, and Ground.
  • Simisear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, and Bug.
  • Zebstrika is weak to Ground, and advantageous over Flying and Water. Note that it may have the Lightningrod ability, which will nullify any Electric attacks other than its own if you're in the room with it.
  • Zoroark is a rarity here, and will usually only appear under the influence of its Illusion ability - in other words, if it is using its Illusion ability, you will have to attack it to see if it truly is Zoroark. Zoroark will still retain his typing under this "shroud", though, no matter what Pokémon he is posing as. He is weak to Fighting and Bug, takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic.

Scientifically speaking, this dungeon became a withered savanna for a reason. The dungeon can get Sunny at times, halting automatic HP restoration, strengthening Fire moves (like on Simisear), weakening Water moves (like on Seismitoad and Azurill), and, if you've somehow got it, making SolarBeam require no charging-up turn. Otherwise, though, this is your typical Mystery Dungeon - nothing special about it.

Sometimes, also, it can Rain - basically it reverses the Sunny thing and makes Thunder 100% accurate.

Anyways, save on the way out!





Captured!?



Once past the Withered Savanna, as you progress forward, a familiar cackle echoes through the air - Purugly! But from where? Suddenly, four Excadrill drill up from beneath you, encircling you. With Hydreigon on your side, even Purugly is able to recognize the disadvantage she's at, so she'll merely pass on a message - your partner's been captured! He's being held at the Holehills, if you want to save him. o_o;

Suddenly, the enemy disappears. You seem to have already resolved to go save your partner, despite the fact that it is a blatant trap. Hydreigon thinks different - I mean, what if your partner isn't there, then you get overwhelmed by Munna's thugs? The world could very well be lost... Despite this, you move forward - despite Hydreigon's forewarnings, you decide to save your friend; even if it is a trap... if there's just a chance he's been captured...

Hydreigon eventually realizes the inevitable - the bond between you and your partner is too strong and you will save him, with or without Hydreigon, despite the high stakes. Hydreigon also realizes, deep down, he doesn't want to risk your partner's life, either. He decides to travel with you.

Later, you arrive at the entrance of the Holehills - a range of hills dotted with many alcoves and caverns, the perfect place for an ambush. Well, regardless, prepare with the Deposit Box at the entrance and enter the dungeon to the north.





Holehills



  • Dungeon Length: 12 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass, Fire, and Bug are all tied
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Azurill #298 Normal 1F ~ 12F
Jolteon #135 Electric 1F ~ 12F
Larvesta #636 Fire/Bug 1F ~ 12F
Lilligant #549 Grass 1F ~ 12F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 12F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 12F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 12F
Simisear #514 Fire 1F ~ 12F

  • Azurill is weak to Fighting and take little damage from Ghost. It lacks advantages.
  • Jolteon is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Volt Absorb ability, turning Electric attacks against it into HP restoration.
  • Larvesta is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Flying. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Bug, Grass, and Dark.
  • Lilligant and Pansage are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. They have type-based advantages over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Roggenrola is weak to Steel, Fighting, Ground, Grass, and Water. It is advantageous over Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice. It may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass. It knows Megahorn, so you know, a powerful Bug-type move. It is associated with a slight glitch in this dungeon's gridded floors where, basically, if it misses, the grids turn off for a single turn. Don't worry, you didn't do it yourself - they'll come back if they were on in the first place. >_>
  • Simisear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, and Bug.

Your first floor, 1F, is another of those open, gridless floors. Simply progress leftward into the cavern, which will lead to some traditional dungeon floors.

Between 3F and 4F, you and Hydreigon will walk into a clearing. There, you'll see a frozen Frism someone left. You warm it up to find a voice inside - that of your partner! Munna revealed his plan to your partner - tricking you into getting close to Munna, then killing him. Then there's something you not being able to stay in this world before your partner is knocked into unconsciousness, where the recording ends. Hydreigon mentions the obvious before you progress, fully healed, onto 4F.

Once on 6F, you'll find a gridless floor again. Basically head to the right to find the archway into the next dungeon floor. Be sure to check around, too. I found a sparkling area yielding an Escape Orb to the southeast of the exit doorway.

Once on 9F, there will be another gridless floor. Simply proceed to the right and leave it at that - you'll find a doorway again. (I wonder what happened to all of the puzzles they had before with these areas?)

Once on 12F, you'll find a westbound path in a gridless area. If you stick along the northern wall, you'll find a staircase to the next area. I would check the whole area, though, for enemies to the battle and sparkly areas. I actually found three, all west of the stairs - to the curious, they contained a Gold Bar, a Zinc Band, and a Warp Seed. Obviously, though, it remains random. Anyways, head upstairs and further north into the next area.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

As you approach the peak of the Holehills, Hydreigon warns you to be wary - now would be the best time to launch an ambush, when you're weak and weary, and overcome with emotions. Meanwhile, Toxicroak and Munna look on at your partner, ever-determined and strong in the direst of fates. Toxicroak thinks you'll appear here at night, when visibility is low. Munna doesn't think so, knowing it probably wouldn't work twice. She turns to your partner, mockingly commenting on his and your abilities. He defiantly replies that they'll never be able to catch you.

Some time later, we see Toxicroak, boredly beginning to doze off. Ever the faithful, loyal companion, your partner reiterates that they'll never catch you. Meanwhile, we hear rocks roll down the bumpy, rough cliffside. Toxicroak goes off to check it out - I mean, it's not like you're planning to sneak att-- Oh, I see you are. =P Still, Munna's set up her own trap with one of the Frisms. Her group quickly closes in and surrounds you...

Purugly then wisely remembers Hydreigon, who seems to be absent for the time being. Everyone looks up to see Hydreigon, nose-diving down at the mob, loosing off numerous Dragon Pulses. The group scatters and the hut is shattered. Meanwhile, Munna realizes just what you're up to and calls a bunch of Salamence for a counterstrike.

You dig hurriedly through the cave to find, as you predicted, your partner at the other end! You free him from his bondage and leave the cave... Only to find a dead-end! Munna's gang closes around you once more, and it seems like all hope is truly lost... (Now would be a good time to turn on the 3D!) Then Hydreigon blazes out one of the caves and grabs the both of you. The Salamence tail you, but to no avail, despite how close they come

Your partner has been successfully rescued! Save the game!





United We Stand!



Obviously, this all has taken a lot out of Hydreigon, so they decide to take a break on a cliff. It seems we're all fine now - probably being tailed, but not at the moment. Apologies and thanks are passed all around as you elaborate on how you saw through Munna's ruse. It began with the Frism you saw around 3F on the Holehill, dropped by your partner... Or was it dropped involuntarily? It seemed much more likely that your partner's voice had been forcefully recorded. Upon closer examination, it was also revealed that the Frism wasn't even your partner's! And where there's one, there's probably more. In that case, kinda like Emolga did way-back-when, Munna might just set up an ambush.

Anyways, it also looks like your partner needs to get caught up on Hydreigon not being bad before we need to invent toilet paper. >_>

Once caught up, your partner agrees that we need to go to the Great Glacier and destroy the Bittercold. As Hydreigon points out, our journey will be less fraught with trial if we got Espeon and Umbreon to summon use a Magnagate bringing us there. We leave immediately towards the next dungeon.

Well, prepare for this next one, the Scorching Desert! Remember to give your partner some kind of hold item, too, if you usually do. And don't forget the sunscreen.





Scorching Desert



  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Rock, Fire, and Bug are all tied
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't actually join the party, just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Cranidos #408 Rock 1F ~ 10F
Flareon #136 Fire 1F ~ 10F
Galvantula #596 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 10F
Garbodor #569 Poison 1F ~ 10F
Golett #622 Ghost/Ground 6F ~ 10F
Klang #600 Steel 1F ~ 10F
Larvesta #636 Fire/Bug 1F ~ 10F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 10F

  • Flareon is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, and Bug.
  • Galvantula is weak to Fire and Rock, and has an advantage over Dark, Grass, Psychic, Flying, and Water. Try not to get close to it - it has Bug Bite, which could take out some of the items in your Bag and let the Galvantula use them. Galvantula may use Thunder Wave to paralyze you. It may also use Gastro Acid, nullifying your ability for a while if it hits. Then there's Spider Web, which may immobilize you, and String Shot, which may halve your movement speed... Gah, just get rid of these bugs the first chance you get.
  • Garbodor is weak to Psychic and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass. You want to be quick fighting this - it may have the Weak Armor ability. When you hit it, it may lower its Defense ... then get an additional move per turn!
  • Golett is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Dark, and Ghost, and takes little damage from Fighting, Normal, and Electric. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Klang is weak to Fighting, Fire, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Ice and Rock.
  • Larvesta is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Flying. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Bug, Grass, and Dark. He can use String Shot to halve your speed, but that's about it.
  • Roggenrola and Cranidos are weak to Steel, Fighting, Ground, Grass, and Water. They are advantageous over Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice. Roggenrola may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.

Not a whole lot to say about this dungeon. Just beware that Monster Houses, quite rare in recent days (I found only one since losing my partner) come back in force here. Try to be prepared for it - Petrify Orbs, All Power Orbs, save Team Attacks, etc.

Also note that the weather can change here. As usual, this will prohibit automatic HP growth. Here, the weather of the day is Sandstorm - all Pokémon, except those of the Ground, Rock, or Steel types will take a point of damage every few turns.





In the Dark Depths of Despair, a Bright Light Shines...



After finishing ten floors of the Scorching Desert, you find that it's getting quite dark. (And presumably quite cold, too, as sand does not hold heat well. As your partner confirms.) Our pace slows down to a walk, seeing as it's unlikely anyone is following us due to the climate and time - not to mention we've spotted no one so far.

Hydreigon does begin to think it's colder than it should be, though, even for a desert. Still, the dune up ahead supposedly marks the end of the desert. (Yeeeeeah... Like sand doesn't get blown around and each dune looks unique. =/) ...








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE BELOW TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








All of a sudden, a roar reverberates through the chilled air. Kyurem drops down oh-so-gracefully from above, wasting no time in blasting Hydreigon with his signature move, Glaciate! Hydreigon is frozen solid, but this is not enough for Kyurem - Kyurem then shatters the block, killing Hydreigon! Your partner tells you to run, to no avail - Kyurem rears up and stomps you. Repeatedly...

Your partner can only look on in dazed, depressed disgust... For a moment. Suddenly, your enraged partner steps between you and Kyurem, begging for him to leave you alone. Noticing that your partner now only cares for the safety of his best friend, and you both have lost the will the fight, Kyurem feels you'll be unable to change the future.

As Kyurem stalks off, your partner finally asks the important question... Kyurem knows the world is going to end, but why not stop this? Kyurem first states that the world's end is not an impending threat that's years or decades away, but mere days now, and it is inevitable as long as he protects it. The world has grown cold towards Kyurem (if you remember the popular Black/White canon plot behind him) and itself - few Pokémon have the ability to trust anyone anymore. They're just all concerned with themselves, he says.

This negativity swirled and stagnated about the air around the Great Glacier until it took a physical form, the Bittercold. Soon, the Bittercold will sweep about the world and, in a bout of irony, end this metaphorically-cold world with true freezing, an infinite, unescapable ice age. A new world will be born; the planet will get a second chance. This is what Kyurem fights for - like the fire that blazes through the pine forest, new life may arise, better than that what was lost.

The Voice of Life is no different than the other Pokémon of the planet - it is their unison voice, and therefore the unison voice of Pokémon just focused on their own lives, wanting their own selfish lives to continue. Kyurem then mentions the lights, the lights you saw from Post Town - they are the souls of humans turned into Pokémon, returned to whence they came: the human world. Summoned by Hydreigon, as Kyurem newly reveals to your partner, many more human-Pokémon resided in this world.

All have been defeated and sent back to the human world, bar one - you. Kyurem again states that the end of this world is inevitable - you cannot change it, no matter what you do. If you are able to realize this, that you will all die quite soon, Kyurem will allow you and your partner a few more days as Pokémon... But, if you still feel like you have a chance and want to ride on it, Kyurem promises you a painful, slow, merciless death - what happened tonight will be a mere slap on the wrist compared to what he'll do.

Kyurem then leaves and your partner finally has the presence of mind to check on you. But you're not even moving, and your partner is alone, in the middle of a desert. Suddenly, voices are heard in the distance as Emolga and Dunsparce finally approach! It seems they've been searching for a fair while now since you failed to return in a timely manner to Post Town. Your partner pushes aside the small talk, pointing out the unconscious you nearby. They decide to carry you somewhere where you can be better tended.

You eventually awaken in a forested area, surrounded by Umbreon, Espeon, Virizion, Dunsparce, Emolga, and, of course, your loyal partner. You've been out for quite a while. As you think about how to thank these guys for saving your life, your partner questions Emolga and Dunsparce on how they found you in the first place.

As a search party was planned for Mount Kilionea, a voice was heard by all, out of nowhere, telling them to go to the Scorching Desert, where you were, in fact, found. The group split up and searched across the desert. While Emolga and Dunsparce were together, a light floated across the path, enticing them to follow, and it led them to you and your partner. Perhaps it was Hydreigon's soul, after being crushed like that...

We decide to look on the current situation. As Kyurem and Hydreigon have both pointed out, it is the negativity and the selfishness of the Pokémon that have created the Bittercold. Destroying it isn't gonna change anything - Pokémon are always going to be negative at times, yes, and with them on this extreme, it's going to take something more drastic, more permanent than sending a team to the Great Glacier every twenty minutes. Kyurem's "inevitable future" is, in fact, beginning to look more ... well, inevitable. I mean, you can't send teams there rapidly - you'll just get Pokémon killed that way - and you can't easily changes the minds of millions...

This thought gets Umbreon and Emolga into a heated argument. As far as Emolga's concerned, it seems like Umbreon has given up all hope, that's he okay with the world ending. Obviously, he's not, but he can understand how Kyurem feels. Hasn't Emolga - hell, any ONE of us, Pokémon, human, video game player - thought that this world was screwed up, messed up, going straight into the toilet, and there's not a single bit of hope for the world... That a brand-new start is needed?

Espeon begins to agree with Umbreon, then Virizion. When asked his opinion, your partner notes how frightened he was when you were being smashed by Kyurem, who soon said that Kyurem would destroy all in his way towards this questionably-better future, namely you. He was scared and lost his nerve; he can admit that now. Your partner doesn't want to see you hurt again ... then again, he also doesn't want to accept that the world's going to end! The world has become dark, it has become desolate - it is a land of dark despair. That's why your partner to build the Paradise - so there might be a light at the end of this tunnel, that Pokémon may learn again to trust unconditionally, that Pokémon might actually learn what friendship truly entails, that Pokémon the world over may have a better life. And Pokémon joined alongside him in his valiant dream - there may be many more dark Pokémon in the world, but your partner knows he can depend on each and every Pokémon here!

It is this trust - this inviolable bond between each and every Pokémon that wholly trusts one another that can be the light that overpowers the darkness of the despair; that which is noble enough and kind enough to melt even the coldest of hearts. This is what your partner has learned from you and his other many new friends - to lose you all now is absolutely unacceptable to him! Umbreon then apologizes for his harsh words earlier, understanding what your partner has so vividly spoken. As he says, despite all of the Pokémon out there that hate and despise each other, there have to be those who trust others, and not just us! Not everyone is looking for a fight; not everyone is selfish and egocentric! If we could just, somehow, someway, spread this feeling among the other Pokémon of the world - a feeling of hope, a feeling of faith in others, a feeling of trust - then we could truly combat the Bittercold and save the world - imperfect, yes, but it is our Paradise. Heck, Virizion could change - why not others?

And so we vow to see what we can do about this. First, to Post Town, to spread the news. But we also need to plan to destroy the Bittercold - after all, it has already physically manifested itself, and we will need a non-Pokémon - a human-Pokémon - to get close enough to be able to simply survive, then shatter it, for good. You may have to face Kyurem again - maybe even alone, mano y Pokémano. Despite this, despite the high stakes, you obviously accept - you, too, have formed such powerful bonds with the Pokémon of this world, a world not even your own; you don't want to see them go, just as they don't want to see you go.

Destruction is not far off...

We need to hurry.

If we do, we just might all have a future together beyond the next couple of days! (Save the game!)








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE ABOVE TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!













A Glimmer of Hope










EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE BELOW TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








You arrive back in Post Town that very evening. You decide to tell everyone the news the next morning. Once you regain control, go ahead and on outside. There, you'll meet with Emolga, Umbreon, Espeon, Dunsparce, and Virizion, all ready for "the talk". =P It might be hard to convince them at first, but we have no doubt they'll pull through... Hopefully. You head on down to the square as Emolga shouts you good luck.

In the town square, it seems like we've gotten a fair sum of Pokémon together. Your partner shouts over the crowd to get their attention. Your partner gives them the information you discussed the previous afternoon with the team in the woods. Obviously, the news that the world is going to end is surprising everyone, especially with it probably being at least partly their fault from their negativity.

Your partner has to calm them down again for the second part. The world is teetering on the head of a pin now, yes, but there is hope. The Bittercold is fed by negativity - take that away and the Bittercold is merely a crystal for the shattering. If everyone would learn to trust, learn to befriend, learn to be loyal, learn to have faith in each other, learn to have hope for the future, then the Bittercold is beatable. And then, we could go there and smash it. It's not too late for fate to be changed, for fate is never written - so long as everyone wholeheartedly pulls together, the world could be saved.

Obviously, then, Kyurem remains the biggest concern. I mean, he had no trouble ripping through all of the ... others. Perhaps there's a way to get around Kyurem...

Then again, he can see the future. If he's already seen the end of the world as Patrat says, doesn't that mean your efforts are going to end in vain regardless? Things keep sinking back in the wrong direction - everyone begins to believe Patrat, Roggenrola suggests doing whatever we want... They just keep running from the truth, one, by one, by one... They've already given up; maybe there is no hope.

Suddenly, the ground begins to shake and everyone approaches the hill to see what's going on. From there, they can see the Glacier Palace in the distance - floating... The Bittercold already has gained such power to be able to lift a veritable fortress as that, that high in the air to be seen from so far away... The end is near, ain't it? Sadly, it is that one thought that draws everyone into a frightened craze.

Well, crap, that screwed up. What now?

That evening, as Emolga points out, only Swanna even bothered to stay for the rest. Just ... how can we even begin to combat the negativity of the Pokémon if this is how they react to the world's probable end - not doing what could aid themselves most, but simply running away from both the Glacier Palace and the truth? As Virizion points out, in the real world, things don't always work out, and trying to fix those things can just make it worse. It is these kinds of experiences that is driving everyone away from trying to fix 'em for fear of not making it worse, but for fear of feeling that sense of despair and letdown. It's easier. It's less painful sometimes. As time goes on, it changes you, deep down.

As Emolga points out, it'll probably be a similar experience if we go to other towns - Hydreigon was brought about by their unanimosity in wanting to live, and the Bittercold by their unanimosity in hopelessness. Gah. Maybe there's nothing we can do, but sit here and try to enjoy the rest of our days...

Suddenly, Lillipup comes in, apologizing for his fearful escape, and begging for a way that he may help. And so your partner tells him - be brave, have courage, be hopeful. He happily accepts this philosophy and leaves, calling for Herdier. Rather odd, we find it, so we go outside to find several others - Swadloon, Leavanny, Herdier, and Swanna! Herdier apologizes for his behavior earlier. He notes that, while he has led a long and fulfilled life, and cares not of his own life, it is that of his grandson, those of the children, those with their whole lives yet to be lived that he wants saved. The same can be said for Leavanny.

As Swanna points out, many of the Pokémon in the world are, in fact, selfish. But, even then, if the world's going to end unless you do something, wouldn't it be best then to at least try to preserve your own life, even if it means saving others? It seems more Pokémon are turning than we initially felt. Obviously the news will come as an initial shock to others ... but, if we can spread this feeling, we have a fighting chance. Your partner then decides on the perfect role for those wanting to help - spread the news, spread the feelings of trust and hope! Meanwhile, we'll storm the Glacial Pal--

Oh, right, it's floating in the air. >_> Espeon and Umbreon have already thought about Magnagates, but that doesn't seem to be an all-too-safe idea. Still, Espeon has a slight hunch on something... They set off for the Great Glacier while you get some Entercards ready for a different journey, meeting in the whereabouts of the middle. We decide to wait until morning to prepare and leave. Dunsparce volunteers to stay behind while the team goes to help convince the other Pokémon.

Save the game!








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE ABOVE TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!













Preparing for the Invasion



The morning after all that, you and your partner awaken. He'll go on to the hill to set up the Entercards, practicing with Emolga in the meantime. You'll be stuck with the preparations for the invasion of the palace.

Meanwhile, two other dungeons have opened up: the Grove of Whispers and the Frozen Pillar. Note that neither of these are actually usable at the moment, but they're there when you can. Anyways, with regard to preparations, I will note that Quagsire is no help for whatever reason. Be sure to visit the Deposit Box and Cofagrigus's store when you need money (come on, tell me you didn't get under 20 Gold Bars during that trip?).

Overall, my preferred items setup for the active party is this. I would obviously love to have as many spares of everything a Deposit Box, because it's going to be another series of dungeons before you are allowed a legitimate shop again.



Whenever you're ready, head up to the hill in Post Town and speak with your partner there. Confirm your choice and your partner will notify you that this is not going to be easy this time around, as if it was easy the first time. (Well, it was easy for me. >_>) If you're sure you're ready, confirm again and the Magnagate will be summoned. After the good-byes and encouragement all around, the chosen four - you, your partner, Virizion, and Emolga - leap through the Magnagate.

On the other side, you'll find yourself at, yes, the entrance to another Magnagate dungeon. But this one seems a little different than the Telluric Path. Maybe the placement of the Entercards got messed up!? Then again, if they were that hard to use, wouldn't Umbreon or Espeon have helped? It might just be the influence of the Bittercold. Well, regardless, prepare your party and head out.





Tyrian Maze



  • Dungeon Length: 11 floors + end (B12F)
  • Dominant Types: Ghost and Rock by negligibly-slight margins
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Beartic #614 Ice B1F ~ B11F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying B1F ~ B11F (detours)
Carracosta #565 Water/Rock B1F ~ B11F
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire B12F (boss)
Cranidos #408 Rock B1F ~ B11F
Galvantula #596 Bug/Electric B1F ~ B11F
Garbodor #569 Poison B1F ~ B11F
Golett #622 Ground/Ghost B1F ~ B11F
Lampent #608 Ghost/Fire B1F ~ B11F
Salamence #373 Dragon/Flying B12F (boss)
Simisage #512 Grass B1F ~ B11F

  • Beartic is weak to Rock, Fighting, Fire, and Steel, and is advantageous over Flying, Ground, Grass, and Dragon.
  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. He'll only appear on the floors with detours, but I can say from experience that you do NOT want to bother with said detour any longer than you have to, because these powerful jerks will come quickly and come hard.
  • Carracosta is weak to Grass (4x), Electric, Fighting, Ground, and Steel. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Ice, and Flying. He may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Cranidos is weak to Grass, Fighting, Steel, Water, and Ground. It has advantages over Flying, Bug, Ice, and Fire.
  • Galvantula is weak to Fire and Rock, and has an advantage over Dark, Grass, Psychic, Flying, and Water. Try not to get close to it - it has Bug Bite, which could take out some of the items in your Bag and let the Galvantula use them. Galvantula may use Thunder Wave to paralyze you. It may also use Gastro Acid, nullifying your ability for a while if it hits. Then there's Spider Web, which may immobilize you, and String Shot, which may halve your movement speed... Gah, just get rid of these bugs the first chance you get.
  • Garbodor is weak to Psychic and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass. You want to be quick fighting this - it may have the Weak Armor ability. When you hit it, it may lower its Defense ... then get an additional move per turn!
  • Golett is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Dark, and Ghost, and takes little damage from Fighting, Normal, and Electric. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Lampent is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Ground, and Water, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug.
  • Simisage is weak to Ice, Flying, Fire, Poison, and Bug, and is advantageous over Water, Rock, and Ground.

Generic dungeon; nothing to see here. There is a breather floor between B5F and B6F.

As you pass by B11F, Emolga will note that he can see a light up ahead - an exit? You hastily approach to see it and you find a frozen wasteland... Yes, you are on, once more, the Great Glacier. So, do we just wait for Umbreon and Espeon to stop on by? You are, however, curious about the roaring sound. It's too loud, too contstant to be a mere wind. Suddenly, light leaves the area and you look above - it is the Glacier Palace, disturbing the air currents to make the roaring, persistent noise and blotting out the very sun. It seems, then, that the Palace is on the move towards something.

Emolga also hears something else, the whisper of wind as wings slice through the air... Suddenly, a Salamence lands in front of you, one of Munna's gang; he is followed by two Chandelure. Their intentions are quite obvious, and so should our reaction - fight!

BOSS (B12F): Salamence, Chandelure, and Chandelure

  • Salamence is weak to Ice (4x), Rock, and Dragon. It will take little damage from Ground, and has type-based advantages over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass. Salamence also seems to be the possessor of the Tough Skill... This Team Skill will allow him to survive an attack that may otherwise KO him, and this goes for the Chandelure as well, so don't leave him alone so rashly - wait 'till his sprite disappears.
  • Chandelure is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Ground, and Water, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug. It can use Smog, which is Poison-type, does damage, and probably will Poison you. It also knows Confuse Ray, which obviously confuses you. If you have a Health Orb, you should be fine in this regard.

First things first, it would be a nice idea to open the onslaught with a useful orb - something like the All Power-Up Orb will do fine for a turn, maybe, depending on how your allies move around. You shouldn't take any damage if you set their Tactics to "Wait there". Don't think about using something like a Foe-Hold Orb, though - the Chandelure have the Prevention ability, destroying that tactic. So you can merely rely on your own self-augmentation - All Power-Up Orbs and All Dodge Orbs should be sufficient for this fight. You'll want to take down the Chandelure first, since they have a tendency to induce Poisoning and Confusion.



Kyurem and the Bittercold




Sectional Flowchart








Explorers of Sky



After the battle, the trio of baddies will pass out on the snow, defeated. After Emolga taunts one of the Chandelure a little, he turns his back, saying we should hurry up and go forward. Meanwhile, the taunted Chandelure tries one last blow, but in vain, defeated by Espeon. She says Umbreon is also nearby, getting it all ready, a way into the Glacier Palace.

You'll find Umbreon near the edge of a crevass, with three of four Entercards already placed - yes, they're going to summon a Magnagate. These Entercards are special - they prevent you from having to go through an intermediate dungeon; you'll just last straight in front of the Palace! Question is, where they did get them? Umbreon and Espeon didn't make them, but found them in the glaciers left behind by the Palace. Remember the Magnagate, the very old one you found back in the expedition, near the numerous crevasses that triggered a light show?

As far as we know, only one Pokémon made it as far as we did, and therefore could be the only foreseeable owner of these special Entercards - Keldeo. He actually made these himself, somehow, in an unusual but very effective way, such that you can cross even through the sky itself. It is then posited that maybe Keldeo even lives, still lost in the Glacier Palace somewhere, still hunted by Kyurem, helping us however he can.

Well, save.

Meanwhile, back in Post Town, we can see that the Glacier Palace is edging ever closer, becoming ever more visible to the town. Those nearby - Ducklett, Patrat, and Rufflet - begin to think that this, again, means the annihilation of the world is near and begin to freak. Dunsparce tries to calm them down, saying nothing has actually happened yet - it's merely drifting along with the wind for all we know. They then begin to think that the world around the Bittercold will begin crumbling near the end of the world and head to tell the townspeople before Dunsparce again halts them, saying not to spread rumors and panic like that. Swanna comes up, agreeing with Dunsparce and harshly scolding those worrywarts.

On the other side of the special Magnagate, we find ourselves standing on the Glacier Palace. As Keldeo's genius is admired, Emolga suddenly realizes a problem - getting back. Apparently, though, Keldeo's Entercards are even two-way. O_o Anyways, the Salamence from before came from up here, so it can only be naturally assumed that Munna and her gang are close as well. Whether they know of our presence is unknown, but, to be safe, it would be a nice idea to split into three groups of two each - Umbreon and Espeon, you and your partner, and Virizion and Emolga. Everyone heads off their own way.

Prepare yourself at the nearby Deposit Box and head east into the next Mystery Dungeon.





Glacier Palace - Eastern Spire



  • Dungeon Length: 12 floors + end (13F)
  • Dominant Types: Bug, Ice, and Rock are all tied
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't join the active party, just return to the Pokémon Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Beartic #614 Ice 1F ~ 12F
Boldore #525 Rock 1F ~ 12F
Carracosta #565 Water/Rock 1F ~ 12F
Crustle #558 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 12F
Cryogonal #615 Ice 1F ~ 12F
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 13F (boss)
Gothitelle #576 Psychic 1F ~ 12F
Lampent #608 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 12F
Mamoswine #473 Ground/Ice 1F ~ 12F
Mandibuzz #630 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 12F
Purugly #432 Normal 13F (boss)
Simipour #516 Water 1F ~ 12F
Volcarona #637 Bug/Fire 1F ~ 12F
Watchog #505 Normal 1F ~ 12F
Whirlipede #544 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 12F

  • Beartic and Cryogonal are weak to Fire, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. They have type-based advantages over Grass, Dragon, Flying, and Ground. Beartic notably knows Powder Snow and Icy Wind. These are Ice-type line-of-sight moves that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Boldore is weak to Water, Grass, Ground, Fighting, and Steel. It is advantageous over Fire, Ice, Flying, and Bug. It may also have the Sturdy ability, which will let it survive attacks that would otherwise KO it, if at full HP when hit, with 1 HP. That also means that, if the game tells you it survives because of Sturdy, then you should just use a basic A Button attack to save a little PP.
  • Carracosta is weak to Grass (4x), Electric, Steel, and Fighting. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Ice, Bug, and Flying. This Pokémon may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP. Alternatively, it may have the Solid Rock ability, which weakens the damage from moves that are super-effective to it.
  • Crustle is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP. Crustle cam also be annoying because of Shell Smash - it sharply raises its Attack and Special Attack, slightly lowers its Defense and Special Defense, and triples it speed!
  • Gothitelle is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug; it is also advantageous over Fighting and Poison. This Pokémon can annoyingly use Flatter. It is a move which will sharply raise the target's Special Attack, but also put the confusion status on them, so don't exactly "hope" for it to happen.
  • Lampent is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Water, and Ground. It will take little damage from Normal and Fighting, and is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Grass, Bug, and Steel.
  • Mamoswine is weak to Fire, Fighting, Grass, Water, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Electric, Rock, Steel, Poison, Grass, Flying, and Ground. It notably knows Powder Snow. This is an Ice-type line-of-sight move that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and it may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Mandibuzz is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and it takes little damage from Ground and Psychic. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Simipour is weak to Grass and Electric, and is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Volcarona is weak to Rock (4x), Flying, and Water. It has type-based advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, Steel, Dark, and Psychic.
  • Watchog is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages. However, it can use the move Super Fang to take away half of your current HP, regardless of your type.
  • Whirlipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.

There's not a bunch to say about this dungeon. I will note that, despite the fact that you and your partner are going this dungeon alone, you should still bring alone preparatory items for Monster Houses - heck, I found one on the first floor! Stuff like Petrify Orbs and Foe-Hold Orbs should be sufficient here for that, seeing as you can easily then just narrow them down and gang up on the poor "monsters".

Past 1F, you'll watch a scene with Umbreon and Espeon, who seem to have reached a breather floor in their own dungeon. There, Umbreon notes the obvious, then Espeon halts them for a moment...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

She asks him why he lied about using Keldeo's Entercards to get back, when such is not truly possible. Not just he and she knew, but also Virizion. Espeon already knows the answer - she didn't want to induce needless fear in Emolga and the others, a feeling of hopelessness that would only impede their efforts. Umbreon agrees and then notes that it is not for certain whether they even lied or not. They just didn't have enough time to test it - besides, they have to focus on defeating Kyurem and the Bittercold, or there won't be something to return TO anyways. Still, Espeon wants to be able to make it back...

Once you bypass 5F, you'll watch another scene, this time focusing on Virizion and Emolga. Virizion notes how far they've come and is met with silence from Emolga. She eventually remembers that Emolga hates her and realizes that he got the short end of the deal, or so she thinks. Sure, she initially was cold towards him, but Emolga eventually understood after hearing about the incident with Keldeo, and it's not like Virizion's a bad Pokémon. Emolga apologizes for being so rude to her back then. Personal issues aside, they decide to trek forward into the unknown, while Virizion gives him a nice comment - "... you're kind of a tough guy even though you're adorable. That's why I like you." =P Well, he's surprised. Anyways, moving on... It seems you're fully healed in the interim as well. Lucky you.

Between 8F and 9F, you'll find a breather floor. Prepare as you will at the nearby Deposit Box and push onward.

After finishing 12F of the East Tower, your partner sees a way out ahead!

Meanwhile, Emolga and Virizion also find the entrance to another dungeon. There, in the clearing just before the entrance, Purugly appears before them, astonishes that you managed to even get here. A number of Excadrill then emerge from ice in the ambush. Virizion can see the steep odds here, and thinks fleeing is a better option.

Suddenly, you and your partner run up, evening out the odds a little. For all of Purugly's threats, you remain steady in your efforts to defy Kyurem, and a fight begins!

BOSS (13F): Purugly and Excadrill (x6)

  • Purugly is weak to Fighting and lacks type advantages, but it does take little damage from Ghost. Its Fury Swipes move is absurdly powerful, easily able to cut off 25 damage with each of the two-to-five hits (at least, on a Level 41 Pikachu). If stuff like that becomes a problem, you can always throw a Blinker Seed at it or something.
  • Excadrill are weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and take little damage from Poison and Electric. They are advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, and Ice.

Do take note that Virizion and Emolga are likely to level up a few times after your initial move, since you probably got a fair sum of EXP. in the previous dungeon. Just expect that.

As with most such boss battles, opening with an Orb of some kind would be helpful. All Power-Up Orbs are greatly helpful for boosting strength here, and those like the Petrify Orb will pretty much keep everyone except Purugly petrified for a while. That means you can first focus on Purugly and deal with the rest one by one by one. I will note that you can directly heal Virizion and Emolga here via items, and the same goes for stuff like Reviver Seeds, Violent Seeds, what-have-you. If you go through the petrification strategy, do recall that, since the interim between petrification and animation is virtually infinite unless you attack, so you can use the A and B Buttons to heal between "battles".





Safety in Numbers



After the battle, Purugly lies injured on the ground, near-unconscious from pain and exhaustion, as do her minion Excadrill. You quickly agree to move forward before they all get up and start tailing you again. Go ahead and save!

Meanwhile, Kyurem notes in his dream with Munna that they've come far to the south now. The Winds of Despair around the Bittercold are continuing to grow stronger from the panic of the Pokémon below; and so, the Bittercold, too, strengthens. Perhaps the apocalypse is going to come even sooner than Kyurem predicted. He still feels it to be unstoppable, especially now with such massive negative power surrounding the Bittercold.

But there is always that one chance... That infinitesimally small chance... Kyurem decides to maintain security for now. As far as Munna cares, this terrible world that deserves no such privilege as existence is coming to an end. But does she not seem hesitant? Anyways, Toxicroak runs up to her, notifying her that you and your team are ascending through the Palace! There's only one reason for this: to destroy the Bittercold. Rather than panic and send out search parties, Munna calmly notes that their intended destination is obvious... Wait there, and you'll be able to destroy them.

Anyways, we find ourselves at the entrance of another dungeon, oddly without Espeon and Umbreon. I wonder what happened... Anyways, the four of you opt to stick together this time, given that Munna probably knows you're here - safety in numbers. But the issue of Espeon and Umbreon is rather concerning... Still, if they were here, we know what they'd want - for us to proceed forward, and to make the turning of the hearts of Pokémon in the world below an effort that will not die in vain!

Prepare for the next dungeon - remember to get stuff for Emolga and Virizion! - and head on in.





Glacier Palace - Western Spire



  • Dungeon Length: 12 floors + end (13F)
  • Dominant Types: Bug, Ice, and Rock primarily
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't join the active party, just return to the Pokémon Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Beartic #614 Ice 1F ~ 12F
Boldore #525 Rock 1F ~ 12F
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire 13F (boss)
Crustle #558 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 12F
Gigalith #526 Rock 13F (boss)
Glaceon #471 Ice 1F ~ 12F
Gothitelle #576 Psychic 1F ~ 12F
Klinklang #601 Steel 1F ~ 12F
Mandibuzz #630 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 12F
Mienshao #620 Fighting 1F ~ 12F
Munna #517 Psychic 13F (boss)
Simipour #516 Water 1F ~ 12F
Stoutland #508 Normal 1F ~ 12F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting 13F (boss)
Volcarona #637 Bug/Fire 1F ~ 12F
Whirlipede #544 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 12F
Zoroark #571 Dark 1F ~ 12F

  • Beartic and Glaceon are weak to Fire, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. They have type-based advantages over Grass, Dragon, Flying, and Ground. Beartic notably knows Powder Snow and Icy Wind. These are Ice-type line-of-sight moves that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Boldore is weak to Water, Grass, Ground, Fighting, and Steel. It is advantageous over Fire, Ice, Flying, and Bug. It may also have the Sturdy ability, which will let it survive attacks that would otherwise KO it, if at full HP when hit, with 1 HP. That also means that, if the game tells you it survives because of Sturdy, then you should just use a basic A Button attack to save a little PP.
  • Crustle is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP. Crustle cam also be annoying because of Shell Smash - it sharply raises its Attack and Special Attack, slightly lowers its Defense and Special Defense, and triples it speed!
  • Gothitelle is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug; it is also advantageous over Fighting and Poison. This Pokémon can annoyingly use Flatter. It is a move which will sharply raise the target's Special Attack, but also put the confusion status on them, so don't exactly "hope" for it to happen.
  • Golurk is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Dark, and Ghost, and takes little damage from Fighting, Normal, and Electric. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Klinklang is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and takes little damage from Poison. It has type-based advantages over Rock and Ice.
  • Mandibuzz is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and it takes little damage from Ground and Psychic. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Mienshao is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Simipour is weak to Grass and Electric, and is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Stoutland is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages.
  • Volcarona is weak to Rock (4x), Flying, and Water. It has type-based advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, Steel, Dark, and Psychic.
  • Whirlipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Zoroark is a rarity here, and will usually only appear under the influence of its Illusion ability - in other words, if it is using its Illusion ability, you will have to attack it to see if it truly is Zoroark. Zoroark will still retain his typing under this "shroud", though, no matter what Pokémon he is posing as. He is weak to Fighting and Bug, takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic.

As you progress between 3F and 4F, you'll see a scene detached from your own dungeon trek involving Umbreon, Espeon, and some spoilers. Well, it's below in the box.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

Umbreon and Espeon finally fight off the last of a nasty horde of enemy Pokémon. Meanwhile, they see the ice ahead crackling with electricity on the ice tower. Combine that with the blatant door, either someone is being kept in, or someone kept out. Given the proximity of the fight, they come to the conclusion that this was being guarded - and with such a large number of enemies, it has to be important. For all they know, it might be the Bittercold back there. (I have my doubts - where's Kyurem, then?) They ram the door, shattering it...

Within, they find a number of Entercards scattered across the floor... They look like those they found at the glacier earlier. Suddenly, Espeon turns around and finds a Pokémon lying on the floor -- Keldeo! Not knowing who he is, they go over to him and speak with him; he seems to be okay. It also seems that he purposefully "gave" them the Entercards after all. They need to hurry and escape. Eventually, they vocally realize this is, in fact, Keldeo...

It's all traditional dungeon floors in this dungeon, so you know. Anyways, there's a breather floor between 8F and 9F.

After passing 12F, you'll see another shot of the Glacier Palace. The very negativity of the Pokémon is now having such a difficulty being restrained that it is being manifested as an ominous purple cloud above the Palace. Meanwhile, the area keeps shaking, which cannot be good. Further ahead, you find yourself in a pitch-black area. Something rustles nearby - Munna! Well, the implications are obvious.

BOSS (13F): Munna, Toxicroak, Chandelure, and Gigalith (x4)

  • Munna is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug; she also has type-based advantages over Fighting and Poison.
  • Toxicroak is weak to Psychic (4x), Flying, and Ground. He has type-based advantages over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, and Grass.
  • Chandelure is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Dark, and Ghost, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Bug, Grass, and Steel.
  • Gigalith are weak to Fighting, Steel, Ground, Water, and Grass. They also have type-based advantages over Flying, Ice, Fire, and Bug. They probably have the Sturdy ability, preventing one-hit KOs.

This is another one of those off-kilter battles where you can win easily with the proper items. Aside from the obvious Reviver Seeds and Oran Berry items, you'll also want two main things.

A status item is fairly useless here, thanks to the enemy's Prevention Team Skill - no one is going to get the same status, so only one would be affected by a Status Orb - useless. However, not all's lost. Health Orbs will come in handy here for your own immunization, All Power-Up Orbs will greatly aid in increasing damage, and All Dodge Orbs will lessen your own need for healing.

Multi-target moves will also be a bounty around here. Combine them with an All Power-Up Orb and you've pretty much won. Most of the Pokémon around here don't have much more than 100 ~ 150 HP, which can be easily depleted around Level 40. Of course, Toxicroak is actually the sturdiest of the group, so don't let him get out of hand!





Within The Glacier Palace, A Heart Warms










EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE BELOW TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








After the battle, all of Munna's baddies are weak and kneeling on the ground, realizing their ultimate inevitable defeat. Suddenly, the ground tremors again. Virizion notes that we need to get a move on - this is around as far as we got last time, so Kyurem and the Bittercold, and the suffocating negativity, cannot be far ahead. As you prepare to leave, Munna commands you to wait.

She continues to persist in holding you back, so that the world may start anew; it has been prophesized, and it shall happen. Her reasons are not so unrealistic - Munna and her friends were forsaken by the others of this world - mocked, abused, betrayed; left alone in despair with no hope for a bright future. It's understandable why she might harbor so much hatred for it. She met Kyurem and his underlings; she felt accepted, though she had nothing tangible to offer them or to be mugged for. They reached out to her; befriended her.

Your partner understands how Munna felt, but then the critical question comes up - if she cares for her friends so dearly, then how can she stand to them - and herself - die along with the world? She wants to take them away from their pain, for, without pain, there is bliss - but they'd go in unison as well, so those left behind would not be left to suffer the loss.

As Munna's gang readies for another strike, a bright flash of light appears - Umbreon, Espeon, and Keldeo have summoned a Magnagate exiting here! The Magnagate fizzes closed and Munna expresses her shock at Keldeo's escape. Espeon catches you up on what happened - it seems Keldeo had been kept prisoner, but at will to try and change the minds of the Pokémon living here.

When Keldeo first visited the Palace, he actually made it all of the way to the Great Crystal, the Bittercold, and learned of its secrets. Munna invited him rashly to join their cause, to destroy the world - obviously, Keldeo rejected the offer. He was chased down relentlessly, knowing, after all, of the world's potential fate. But, as he fled, Keldeo wondered if Munna and her gang were wholly dedicated to their efforts. He returned to the Palace willingly and tried to change their minds. He was met with a cage and rejection. Keldeo then notes that Munna probably had, and still retains, her doubts. Munna vehemently rejects this idea - too vehemently, in fact.

At least superficially, Munna says there is naught but evil in this world - that the only way to escape this pain is to die together. But your partner thinks differently - of course there's good in the world! While "good" may be a subjective matter, does Munna not have her friends? Aren't their bonds of trust and loyalty true? Are they really willing to throw it away and disappear; just throw away the bonds of friendship - nay, the very friends themselves - to escape pain? The world has its good and its bad, and it definitely has more of the latter at the moment, but there is the potential for it to change without the use of the Bittercold - if that kind of good world could be created, wouldn't Munna want to live there?

Munna questions the feasibility of this idea - if you even could beat Kyurem, if you even could destroy the Bittercold, could the minds and hearts of the Pokémon change to make that world possible? Your partner vows that he'll do it himself if he needs to! Suddenly, the tremors grow more frequent and intense - an enormous icicle from above falls down towards your party.....

Everyone is scattered by the force of the blast, with you, your partner, and Munna ending up on a relatively isolated ledge. She actually saved you...! Of course, she also took the brunt force of the blow and is seriously injured - barely able to speak, nor get up. She encourages you to keep going - she can't go beyond here without Kyurem knowing, but ... she asks for you to save the world! Keldeo, then everyone else - even Munna's gang - shout their encouragements out to you. You promise to destroy the Bittercold, then progress, just you and your partner, into the next cavern...

Meanwhile, Munna's gang converges on Munna - well, to what extent they can, a large crack being between them and her. Sounds like she's fine, though, relatively speaking. Keldeo's knees suddenly bend in weakness - he's been weak since he was rescued, but insisted on coming. Meanwhile, Virizion decides to speak with him. Keldeo apologizes for the harsh words in his letter, noting that he did it to keep Virizion away from him so she wouldn't be found by Munna and Kyurem. The tearful reunion continues...








EXPECT SOME SPOILERS WITH THE ABOVE TEXT!!!! LIKE WITH THE PREVIOUS LONG SET OF SPOILERS, I DIDN'T BOX THIS FOR READABILITY ISSUES!








Well, ya better save the game.

Meanwhile, you and your partner continue on to the entrance of the next dungeon. Ice shards are falling and sparkling all around, and we're clearly close to the Bittercold now - the negativity is beginning to take its toll on your partner's energy. You must seem worried to your partner, for he futilely shrugs it off and tries to put on a brave face. So loyal...

Anyways, prepare for the next dungeon with the nearby Deposit Box. It's just you and your partner from here on out, so be very ready...





Glacier Palace - Great Spire



  • Dungeon Length: 5 floors + end (6F)
  • Dominant Types: Dark and Steel make up 80% of it
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they won't join the active party, just return to the Pokémon Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Bisharp #625 Dark/Steel 1F ~ 5F
Klinklang #601 Steel 1F ~ 5F
Zweilous #634 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 5F

Dat music... ^_^

  • Bisharp is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground. It takes little damage from both Poison and Psychic, and has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.
  • Klinklang is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and takes little damage from Poison. It has type-based advantages over Rock and Ice.
  • Zweilous is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, and Dragon.

This dungeon is fairly easy, actually. Odds are, you probably will have most of the Pokémon typings working against you - Steel alone resists 11 types! - but these Pokémon barely have more than 80 HP apiece. Combine that with the briefness of this dungeon, and the breather floor between 3F and 4F, and you've got a place to grind vigorously for both move levels and EXP., which I wholly recommend. I would personally prefer it if you are at Level 45+ by the end of the dungeon, anyways... You will definitely want to take some good items from that Deposit Box on the breather floor in preparation for the boss.





The Final Clash!



Past the dungeon, you find yourself near the peak of the Glacier Palace - the very rotation of the dark cloud above is shaking the ground, and your partner is struggling to breathe. The Bittercold must be close. You are definitely concerned for him, though... Suddenly, just in front of you, you find a staircase and a cavern, towards which a strong, chill wind is blowing. The Bittercold may be in there!

As you approach into the large clearing, Kyurem halts you. He confirms that the Bittercold does lie within that passageway - but whether you'll live to see it is a whole 'nother story! Kyurem drops down from above with a roar that shakes the very airspace. He reminds you one last time about the fate you are choosing - a fight to the death. The future cannot be altered, he says, no matter how fierce your desires and actions. But as your partner points out, the future is unwritten - it is up to choice, up to the Pokémon - it is their creation, never set in stone! Kyurem merely states that while a small fate, sure, can be altered, something on so large and grand a scale? Well, you're a mere breeze against a stone wall.

But if you get enough small breezes to blow, the breeze becomes a fierce gale, capable of toppling down any and all in its path - including Kyurem!

Show him by example!

BOSS: Kyurem

Kyurem is of the Ice/Dragon type. That taken into consideration, the following are true:

  • Kyurem takes approximately double damage from Dragon, Fighting, Rock, and Steel.
  • Kyurem takes the normal damage from Normal, Fire, Bug, Flying, Dark, Ghost, Ice, Poison, Ground, and Psychic.
  • Kyurem takes approximately half-damage from Water, Grass, and Electric.

Kyurem also has the ability "Pressure". This will, at minimum, double your PP usage for any move used against him. In a boss battle, though, this is a relatively negligible fact. Kyurem is also unique in that he takes up a 3x3 space rather than the typical 1x1. As far as I can tell, you'll therefore be right next to him when starting.

Kyurem has a fair few moves. One is Slash, a Normal-type move is relatively unnoteworthy. There is also an odd type of DragonBreath - Kyurem needs a turn to charge up for this one. I've never had it hit me, but most two-turn moves like that tend to be quite powerful, so if you're using Axew, make Axew eat a Warp Seed immediately! It also seems to be a line-of-sight move, and is super-effective on Dragon-types.

Kyurem can also use Fly. Fly is a move in which the user goes up into the air on the first turn. During his opponent's next turn, he can only be hit with the move Thunder. On the next turn, he attacks the tile he was initially facing with a Flying-type move, super-effective on Bug, Grass, and Fighting. When you see him Fly up, switch your partner's tactic to "Get away from here", then back off yourself. You may be fortunate enough to avoid damage, although Kyurem's 3x3 size may prevent that - it did for me, anyways, so you may need to use a Warp Seed to escape that.

Finally, Kyurem has his signature move, Glaciate. Glaciate is another two-turn move; a charge on the first turn in which Kyurem gets a sparkling icy mist around him for a brief moment. On the second, the attack is loosed. This attack will affect both you and your partner, for it is a room-wide move, and it is super-effective on Grass, Flying, and Ground-types. It may also halve your movement speed and Freeze you. For this reason, I would recommend also bringing a Health Orb to prevent such status ailments.

Normally, you'd want to begin the fight like any other boss fight - petrification or other status, right? Good luck with that one - it's not gonna work. Instead, you may as well start with self-augmentation - All Power-Up Orbs, All Dodge Orbs, and Violent Seeds all help greatly. I'd start with the All Dodge Orb first, obviously - that will save your life! If you have a Vile Seed, toss it next at Kyurem - this will greatly lower his defensive stats, easily quadrupling your damage in combination with everything else!

Kyurem has the Tough Team Skill, so you know. This will probably keep him at 1 HP when the time comes for him to be defeated - I had it activate five straight turns against me after he hit 1 HP, so be careful. His Last-Minute Team Skill may also keep him evading moves around then as well, so be patient. It will take around 300 HP worth of damage to defeat him, but it's not that hard if you've come prepared with the proper items. Reviver Seeds and Oran Berry items are also great to have in reserve. I personally didn't use any - I'm not bragging, I'm serious - but I can easily see the potential for a need for that.

After the battle, Kyurem collapses on the ground and your partner says we need to hurry to where the Bittercold is. As you walk around Kyurem, he says it is impossible. The strength of your belief may be mighty, especially when allied by that of the Pokémon below, but the future is inevitable. But then... Kyurem would like to see the future be altered. Show him the strength of your will, your bonds of friendship and loyalty - save the world. Destroy the Bittercold and save everyone. You and your partner head up the staircase and into the cavern....

Save the game.

You find yourself floating in mid-air, lifted by the very power of the Bittercold. It is there in front of you - a swirling mass of ice and dark, negative energy, centered on a spiky structure of solid, thorny ice and dark energy so dense as to be solid. Your partner collapses on the ground, suffocated by the negativity. So, it's just you now...

Kyurem calls out to you, calling this no ordinary wind. This Wind of Despair is made of the negative emotions of the Pokémon of the world - these energies blow into the Bittercold, creating a powerful storm that exudes destruction in every direction from which it is approached. This winds provide power and strength to the Bittercold. Your partner is obviously overwhelmed by this energy, but your partner, weak as he is, shrugs it off, urging you to hurry.

As you approach, you find that even you can't breathe... But how? You're not a Pokémon; this is not the negative energy of your species! But, as you think about it, it is merely that powerful - the Pokémon of the world were in a dark place, and then you compare it to what your partner has gone through. You're still conscious.

You slowly inch closer and begin to have trouble breathing, experiencing great pain. This can't be happening; have you come to close to have it all end in vain? You were supposed to be the one soul that could help everyone, but, instead, it seems the world's fate is sealed. It's too late... Suddenly, a cry echoes: "You can do it! Don't give up!" Everyone can hear it - the voices of the Pokémon of the world below, crying in unison for you to carry on and destroy the Bittercold and save their lives! The Winds of Despair begin to falter; you can move forward; you can destroy the Bittercold!

FINAL BOSS: Bittercold

The Bittercold is no typical boss. All you can do is keep attacking, and attacking. As time goes on, you will get damaged, with each turn. You may lose PP from your moves; you may have your stats lowered. If you have a Health Orb spare, that will stop the stat lowering, but that's about as good a defense you can put up against that. You can try an All Dodge Orb to make the attacks miss you as well. Though, when you use either strategy, be sure to not be defeated and then revived by a Reviver Seed, for you'll lose those statuses! (And, for the record, all of those moves are room-wide - you will be at least possibly hit, no matter where you are.)

Fight! Attack!

After around ten turns, you'll begin a scene where you realize your own attacks are still doing naught to the Bittercold. How can you destroy it? Suddenly, a gust of wind gushes from it, just as you begin to doubt yourself... The Bittercold grows more in strength from your own doubt, and that of the Pokémon seeing the vortex from a distance. Your partner then gets to his feet, giving you ever continuing encouragement despite his own intense pain. You decide on one, final attack and strike the Bittercold. A crack appears in it!

Again! The Bittercold gets a hole shattered in it; a ball of light floats up, dissipating the vortex, replacing it with a rainbow... A Rainbow of Hope, but it then is swallowed up by the vortex once more... Back in Post Town, where even they could see it, Patrat goes to spread the news - there is still hope left, then!

With your last vestiges of strength, back at the vortex, you return to your feet, once again hearing the voices of the Pokémon. Your partner climbs to his feet steps forward, encouraging you again to go forward and shatter the Bittercold!

Let's try this again, shall we?

The rules from the previous battle still apply, and so should the ideas of using a Health Orb and an All Dodge Orb - this will make it so much more likely you'll make it through, possible without even a scratch! You will also now want to apply a Violent Seed onto yourself to ... well, it's obvious, ain't it? Just remember, with this, you do not want to even faint, even if revived by a Reviver Seed - be sure to use an Oran Berry or a HP-restorative move whenever you fall below 50 HP. With regard to PP, ignore that. You should only use your most powerful moves - be sure to check it out beforehand, add 50% for attacks of your Pokémon's type, and remember that the Bittercold is typeless. The Bittercold has about 500 HP for you to take care of.

...

I'm not spoiling the rest, but do let the game save at the end.





Post-Credits Walkthrough

A Minor Note To Read

Well, more like two. >_>

Anyways, if you've actually yet to use this guide previously, you may want to check out the section Format (READ!).

Secondly, you'll initially begin by controlling your partner. Remember, when I refer to "you", that means the "you", the human in the game that... Well, you know. "Your partner" remains your partner, the Pokémon who you befriended. Basically, it's like with the pre-credits, but you're not around for a while.



Resurrection?




Sectional Flowchart









Wish Upon A Star



After some initial scenes, months after the saving of the world and the permanent destruction of the Bittercold, you'll take the control of your partner. I will not say why, nor shall I elaborate on what led up to this. Beat the game and find out instead of looking ahead... I will note, though, that Keldeo and Hydreigon have joined the team. Additionally, the dungeons we unlocked before heading out to the Glacier Palace the second time - the Grove of Whispers and the Frozen Pillar are now fully accessible, plus a swathe of others covered in the flowchart just above here. We won't let that interupt the walkthrough - quite a long diversion, no? - so we'll keep what's important here for the time being.

Anyways, filler day. Yeah, just a mission for now.

^sr6|

In the meantime, you've unlocked this thing called "Mysteriosity".

Each dungeon now has a moderately-randomized ranking of Mysteriosity from 1 to 5. The higher it is, the more mysterious the Mystery Dungeon is. The more mysterious it is, the more odd things can get, and the more frequently it will get odd and/or compound. (Like you get into a new dungeon, then only one type of item appears...) Here is a mere sampling of the effects possible. Most of them, except stuff like dungeon-switching that would take place in the interim between a staircase and the next floor, will be accompanied by a wave like that in the nearby screenshot.


  • Enemies may suddenly lose speed.
  • Enemies become weaker in some way.
  • You may switch to a different dungeon (non-DLC, sorry) for a certain number of floors.
  • You may reach a "Uncharted Road", a completely separate area from the main dungeon.
  • Weather can suddenly change.
  • Your HP may no longer restore automatically, even in Clear weather.
  • A permanent Heal Block status until the next floor for allies and enemies.
  • You suddenly lose a crap-ton of PP with each move used.
  • Only one variety of item will appear. (This excludes the sparkling floor tiles, enemy drops, and sometimes Poké.)
  • Abilities stop functioning.
  • The floor is only hallways!

Mind-blowing aside (seriously, first dungeon I go into, Mountain Pass, at Mysteriosity 5, I swap to the Gilded Road or something and get six Gold Ribbons), filler day it is.

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

That evening, the team is dining heartily at Swanna's place, none more so than Hydreigon, who is chatting it up with Emolga and Dunsparce. Have a nice laugh as they do. XD Meanwhile, up on the hill, Virizion finds Keldeo, staring off into the distance. She asks why Keldeo - normally a bit of a recluse, a loner - decided to join your team. He wanted to stay near his friend... Then there's your partner. Your partner was able to convince one of the most stubborn Pokémon, Munna, that there is, in fact, good in this world, that is indeed worth saving. Your partner is definitely a strong, convincing, good-hearted Pokémon - a rarity anywhere.

Your partner is destined to be a great leader - both Virizon and Keldeo feel this. Lately, though, he's been done about what happened with you. They can tell he's depressed and just putting on a mask in front of the others - and understandably so, you being his best friend, now lost and all. But what's done is done... Something like that can't be undone - all we can do is watch over your partner and hope time eventually dilutes the pain.

The next day is more filler.

Later that afternoon, we see Hydreigon staring off into the beautiful distance. He decides to simply lay here until sunset, then something disturbs him. (Turn on the 3D. XD) Anywaaaays... Dunsparce seems to have found him. He wants to ask a favor...

The next morning, in case it isn't obvious, Hydreigon will be unable to stay around for a mission, for whatever reason. For a bit of fun, go into town and speak with Mienfoo - if your town is currently like mine, he'll be just outside Swanna's. See the problem in his speech? XD

Well, whatever. A third filler day it is!

Later that afternoon, Emolga approaches your partner, inquiring as to where Hydreigon went. He has no idea, though, but Emolga needs Hydreigon to pay what remained of their bill for lunch yesterday. (Hydreigon has three mouths to feed; give 'im a break.) Your partner will pass the word along when he finds Hydreigon.

The next morning, Hydreigon still hasn't showed up, and he isn't anywhere in Post Town or the Pokémon Paradise. Suddenly, Hydreigon materializes right behind Emolga, who's a little slow in taking note of his presence. XD It seems these guys care quite a bit about Swanna's food, too. Anyways, as to where Hydreigon went? Well, he wants them all at the inn - first lunch, then the news...

Spoiler. Highlight text to view

There might be a way to get you back to the Pokémon world! It is known that an unnecessary presence, such as that of a human in the Pokémon world, distorts space and time - this was already evident in Explorers of Time/Darkness/Sky. This was Dunsparce asked Hydreigon to do a few days ago. Anyways, it would therefore be a violation of the very laws of nature for you to remain here - thus, you had to go.

It is also stated by the laws of nature that your presence would be erased from the memories of all. But this has not proven true, and the world is still here - perhaps the laws of nature are changing, solely due to a unison want. Perhaps there is a way to return you to this world. In his travels, he settled on a single possibility - no guarantees, but it might work. A wish is effectively it - go to the Worldcore, stand on the Hill of Universal Order, and make the wish. If this wish is not one that will upset the universe, and the desire driving it is strong enough, then it shall be granted. Of course, only one Pokémon can go make the wish. Obviously, the choice is your partner - no one could want you back more than your best friend, still longing for you in the months that passed since your disappearance.

Your partner then thinks back to that promise made so long ago - the one where you rashly promised to stay forever in the Pokémon world. When you hastily agreed, even your partner knew that this was not to come to fruition - even if you had a choice in the matter, you'd probably pick the human world, having friends and family there, too. He understood it would be for the greater good if he just let go.

But what if he were to return? Your partner admits he'd be thrilled... But then you'd leave your friends and family again, this time maybe to never return. Could your partner really put so many people through that just to sate his own desires? But Hydreigon comes up with a solution - not simply wish to have you return, but be able to freely travel between the worlds, letting you choose when to leave, when to come... Maybe it'll work.

Hydreigon then elaborates on why Dunsparce even came to him in the first place for this. It wasn't for his own desire to have you back, but to try and make your partner happy again. And not just Dunsparce was worried, but everyone - ever since the day the Glacier Palace collapsed, your partner just had not been the same. Your partner, tearful with joy, decides then to go to the Worldcore and make that wish, on the hope that maybe - just maybe - it'll work out. Hydreigon will meet your partner at the end of the dungeon - he'll be going it alone.

To sum it up, your partner will go into a dungeon, alone. Prepare well for this journey, for although it won't be particularly lengthy, going it alone is always difficult. Bring along plenty of Oran Berries and Reviver Seeds, now! You can enter the dungeon from the crossroads - the link to the dungeon itself... Well, that's this thingy -- Worldcore.





Grove of Whispers



  • Dungeon Length: 9 floors
  • Dominant Types: Ice, Dragon, Ground, and Dark are all tied, so just say "Various"
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 1F ~ 9F
Cubchoo #613 Ice 1F ~ 9F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 9F
Druddigon #621 Dragon 1F ~ 9F
Krokorok #552 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 9F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 9F
Piloswine #221 Ground/Ice 1F ~ 9F
Trubbish #568 Poison 1F ~ 9F
Vaporeon #134 Water 1F ~ 9F

  • Conkeldurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and advantageous over Ice, Rock, Steel, Normal, and Dark.
  • Cubchoo is weak to Fighting, Fire, Rock, and Steel, and advantageous over Flying, Ground, Grass, and Dragon.
  • Deino is weak to Fighting, Bug, Dragon, and Ice, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Dragon, Psychic, and Ghost.
  • Druddigon is weak to Dragon and Ice, and is advantageous over Dragon.
  • Krokorok is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Pansear is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and advantageous over Steel, Ice, Bug, and Grass.
  • Piloswine is weak to Water, Grass, Fire, Fighting, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Flying, Ground, and Grass.
  • Trubbish is weak to Ground and Psychic and advantageous over Grass.
  • Vaporeon is weak to Grass and Electric and advantageous over Rock, Fire, and Ground.




Frozen Pillar



  • Dungeon Length: 14 floors
  • Dominant Types: Rock, Dragon, and Ground seem the most prevalent
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
[[Archeos]] #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Druddigon #621 Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Dwebble #557 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 14F
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 1F ~ 14F
Gothorita #575 Psychic 1F ~ 14F
Krokorok #552 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 14F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 14F
Seismitoad #537 Ground/Water 1F ~ 14F
Shelgon #372 Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Vaporeon #134 Water 1F ~ 14F
Zebstrika #523 Electric 1F ~ 14F

  • Archeops is weak to Steel, Ice, Rock, Electric, and Water, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Bug, Flying, Fire, Rock, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Conkeldurr is weak to Flying and Psychic, and advantageous over Ice, Rock, Steel, Normal, and Dark.
  • Deino is weak to Fighting, Bug, Dragon, and Ice, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Dragon, Psychic, and Ghost.
  • Druddigon and Shelgon are weak to Dragon and Ice, and advantageous over Dragon.
  • Dwebble is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Gothorita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, and Ice.
  • Krokorok is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Pansear is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and advantageous over Steel, Ice, Bug, and Grass.
  • Seismitoad is weak to Grass (4x), and takes little damage from Electric. It has type advantages over Fire, Rock, Ground, Electric, Poison, and Steel.
  • Vaporeon is weak to Grass and Electric and advantageous over Rock, Fire, and Ground.
  • Zebstrika is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Lightningrod ability as well, which will nullify any enemy Electric-type attacks in the room to boost its own Special Attack.




Windy Shoreline



  • Dungeon Length: 11 floors
  • Dominant Types: Fairly various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Azurill #298 Normal 1F ~ 11F
Dwebble #557 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 11F
Gothorita #575 Psychic 1F ~ 11F
Jolteon #135 Electric 1F ~ 11F
Larvesta #636 Fire/Bug 1F ~ 11F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 11F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 11F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 11F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground 1F ~ 11F
Shelgon #372 Dragon 1F ~ 11F
Simisear #514 Fire 1F ~ 11F
Zebstrika #523 Electric 1F ~ 11F

  • Azurill is weak to Fighting and take little damage from Ghost. It lacks advantages.
  • Dwebble is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Gothorita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Jolteon is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Volt Absorb ability, turning Electric attacks against it into HP restoration.
  • Larvesta is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Flying. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Bug, Grass, and Dark.
  • Pansage is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. It has type-based advantages over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Roggenrola is weak to Steel, Fighting, Ground, Grass, and Water. It is advantageous over Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice. It may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass. It knows Megahorn, so you know, a powerful Bug-type move, and has moves like Poison Sting that may poison you.
  • Seismitoad is weak to Grass (4x) and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.
  • Shelgon is weak to Dragon and Ice and is advantageous over Dragon.
  • Simisear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, and Bug.
  • Zebstrika is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Lightningrod ability, which can be used to nullify your Electric-type attacks and boost the Zebstrika's Special Attack.




Canyon Foot



  • Dungeon Length: 9 floors
  • Dominant Types: Fairly various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 9F (detours)
Azurill #298 Normal 1F ~ 9F
Jolteon #135 Electric 1F ~ 9F
Krookodile #553 Ground/Dark 1F ~ 9F
Larvesta #636 Fire/Bug 1F ~ 9F
Lilligant #549 Grass 1F ~ 9F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 9F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 9F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 9F
Simisear #514 Fire 1F ~ 9F

  • Archeops is weak to Water, Steel, Ice, Rock, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type-based advantages over Grass, Bug, Fighting, Flying, Ice, and Fire.
  • Azurill is weak to Fighting and take little damage from Ghost. It lacks advantages.
  • Jolteon is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. It may have the Volt Absorb ability, turning Electric attacks against it into HP restoration.
  • Krookodile is weak to Grass, Water, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Larvesta is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Flying. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Bug, Grass, and Dark.
  • Lilligant and Pansage are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. They have type-based advantages over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Roggenrola is weak to Steel, Fighting, Ground, Grass, and Water. It is advantageous over Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice. It may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass. It knows Megahorn, so you know, a powerful Bug-type move, and has moves like Poison Sting that may poison you.
  • Simisear is weak to Rock, Water, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Steel, and Bug.




Silent Tundra



  • Dungeon Length: 27 floors
  • Dominant Types: Ice and Electric
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Beartic #614 Ice B1F ~ B27F
Cryogonal #615 Ice B1F ~ B27F
Cubchoo #613 Ice B1F ~ B27F
Dewott #502 Water Uncharted Road
Emolga #587 Electric/Flying B1F ~ B27F
Glaceon #471 Ice B1F ~ B27F
Jolteon #135 Electric B1F ~ B27F
Oshawott #501 Water Uncharted Road
Pichu #175 Electric Uncharted Road
Pikachu #025 Electric Uncharted Road
Piloswine #221 Ground/Ice B1F ~ B27F
Raichu #026 Electric B1F ~ B27F
Samurott #503 Water Uncharted Road
Sewaddle #540 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B27F
Swinub #220 Ground B1F ~ B27F
Tornadus #641 Flying Golden Chamber
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison B1F ~ B27F
Zebstrika #523 Electric B1F ~ B27F

  • Beartic, Cryogonal, Cubchoo, and Glaceon all are weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and are advantageous over Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Dewott, Oshawott, and Samurott are each weak to Grass and Electric and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Emolga is weak to Ice and Rock, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Flying, Water, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.
  • Jolteon, Zebstrika, Pichu, Pikachu, and Raichu are weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. Jolteon may also have the Volt Absorb ability, turning Electric attacks aimed at it into HP; the Pichu evolutionary chain may have the Static ability, which has a chance of paralyzing those that directly attack it. Finally, Zebstrika may have Lightningrod, which nullifies all Electric attacks around it, then boosts its Special Attack for each one.
  • Piloswine is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Fire, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type advantages over Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, Poison, Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Sewaddle is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Swinub is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, and Poison.
  • Tornadus is weak to Electric, Rock, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type advantages over Fighting, Bug, and Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.




Dreamy Island



  • Dungeon Length: 26 floors
  • Dominant Types: Water
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 26F
Azumarill #184 Water 1F ~ 26F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 26F
Carracosta #565 Water/Rock 1F ~ 26F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 26F
Dewott #502 Water Uncharted Road
Marill #183 Water 1F ~ 26F
Oshawott #501 Water Uncharted Road
Pawniard #624 Dark/Steel 1F ~ 26F
Pelipper #279 Water/Flying 1F ~ 26F
Pichu #175 Electric Uncharted Road
Pikachu #025 Electric Uncharted Road
Quagsire #195 Water/Ground 1F ~ 26F
Raichu #026 Electric Uncharted Road
Samurott #503 Water Uncharted Road
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground 1F ~ 26F
Tornadus #641 Flying Golden Chamber
Umbreon #197 Dark 1F ~ 26F
Vaporeon #134 Water 1F ~ 26F
Wingull #278 Water/Flying 1F ~ 26F
Wooper #194 Water/Ground 1F ~ 26F
Zoroark #571 Dark 1F ~ 26F
Zorua #570 Dark 1F ~ 26F

  • Archeops is weak to Water, Steel, Ice, Rock, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type-based advantages over Grass, Bug, Fighting, Flying, Ice, and Fire.
  • Azumarill, Dewott, Marill, Oshawott, Samurott, and Vaporeon are each weak to Grass and Electric and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Braviary is weak to Ice, Electric, and Rock, and takes little damage from Ghost and Ground. It is advantageous over Bug, Grass, and Flying.
  • Carracosta is weak to Grass (4x), Electric, Fighting, Ground, and Steel. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Ice, and Flying. He may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Deino is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It will take little damage from Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Dragon.
  • Pawniard is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground, and takes little damage from Psychic and Poison. It has an advantage over Psychic, Ghost, Rock, and Ice.
  • Pelipper and Wingull are weak to Electric (4x) and Rock, and take little damage from Ground. They are advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Pichu, Pikachu, and Raichu are weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. They may have the Static ability, which has a chance of paralyzing those that directly attack it.
  • Seismitoad, Quagsire, and Wooper are weak to Grass (4x) and take little damage from Electric. They are advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.
  • Tornadus is weak to Electric, Rock, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type advantages over Fighting, Bug, and Grass.
  • Umbreon, Zoroark, and Zorua are weak to Fighting and Bug, and take little damage from Psychic. They have type-based advantages over Ghost and Psychic. The latter two of these have the Illusion ability, which may disguise them as another Pokémon on the floor - note, though, that they still retain their Dark-typing.




Moonlit Forest



  • Dungeon Length: 29 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Garbodor #569 Poison 1F ~ 29F
Gurdurr #533 Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Larvesta #636 Fire/Bug 1F ~ 29F
Leafeon #470 Grass 1F ~ 29F
Leavanny #542 Grass/Bug 1F ~ 29F
Lilligant #549 Grass 1F ~ 29F
Mienshao #620 Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Scolipede #545 Poison/Bug 1F ~ 29F
Scrafty #560 Dark/Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Serperior #497 Grass 1F ~ 29F; Uncharted Road
Servine #496 Grass Uncharted Road
Simisage #512 Grass 1F ~ 29F
Snivy #495 Grass Uncharted Road
Timburr #532 Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Tornadus #641 Flying Golden Chamber
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 29F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 29F

  • Conkeldurr, Gurdurr, Mienshao, and Timburr are weak to Psychic and Flying and advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Croagunk and Toxicroak are weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying. They're advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Garbodor is weak to Ground and Psychic, and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Larvesta is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Flying. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Bug, Grass, and Dark.
  • Leafeon, Lilligant, Serperior, Servine, Simisage, Snivy, and Whimsicott all are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. They also are advantageous over Water, Rock, and Ground.
  • Leavanny is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Scrafty is weak to Fighting and Flying, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.
  • Tornadus is weak to Electric, Rock, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type advantages over Fighting, Bug, and Grass.




Rusty Mountain



  • Dungeon Length: 25 floors
  • Dominant Types: Normal and Rock
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 25F
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 25F
Audino #531 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Azurill #298 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Bisharp #625 Steel/Dark 1F ~ 25F
Boldore #525 Rock 1F ~ 25F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 25F
Carracosta #565 Rock/Water 1F ~ 25F
Cinccino #573 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Cranidos #408 Rock 1F ~ 25F
Crustle #558 Rock/Bug 1F ~ 25F
Dunsparce #206 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Dwebble #557 Rock/Bug 1F ~ 25F
Eevee #133 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 1F ~ 25F
Gigalith #526 Rock 1F ~ 25F
Glameow #431 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Herdier #507 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Klang #600 Steel 1F ~ 25F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 25F
Klinklang #601 Steel 1F ~ 25F
Lillipup #506 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Patrat #504 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Pawniard #624 Steel/Dark 1F ~ 25F
Purugly #432 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Rampardos #409 Rock 1F ~ 25F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 25F
Rufflet #627 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 25F
Serperior #497 Grass Uncharted Road
Servine #496 Grass Uncharted Road
Snivy #495 Grass Uncharted Road
Stoutland #508 Normal 1F ~ 25F
Thundurus #642 Electric/Flying Golden Chamber
Tirtouga #564 Rock/Water 1F ~ 25F
Watchog #505 Normal 1F ~ 25F

  • Archeops and Archen are weak to Water, Steel, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Bug, Grass, Fire, Ice, and Flying.
  • Audino, Azurill, Cinccino, Dunsparce, Eevee, Glameow, Herdier, Lillipup, Minccino, Patrat, Purugly, and Watchog are all weak to Fighting, and all take little damage from Ground. They have no type-based advantages.
  • Bisharp and Pawniard are weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground. They'll take little damage from both Poison and Psychic, and have type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.
  • Boldore, Cranidos, Gigalith, Rampardos, and Roggenrola are weak to Ground, Steel, Fighting, Grass, and Water. They are advantageous over Flying, Fire, Ice, and Bug. They may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Braviary and Rufflet are weak to Ice, Rock, and Electric, and take little damage from Ghost and Ground. They're advantageous over Fighting, Grass, and Bug.
  • Carracosta and Tirtouga are weak to Grass (4x), Electric, Fighting, Ground, and Steel. They are advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Ice, and Flying. They may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Crustle and Dwebble are weak to Water and Rock, and advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. These Pokémon have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP. Crustle cam also be annoying because of Shell Smash - it sharply raises its Attack and Special Attack, slightly lowers its Defense and Special Defense, and triples it speed!
  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Poison, Electric, Steel, and Ice.
  • Klink, Klang, and Klinklang are weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and take little damage from Poison. They are advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Thundurus is weak to Ice and Rock and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Flying, Water, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.




Jaws of the Abyss



  • Dungeon Length: 29 floors
  • Dominant Types: Dragon and Dark
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Axew #610 Dragon Uncharted Road
Bisharp #625 Dark/Steel B1F ~ B29F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon B1F ~ B29F
Druddigon #621 Dragon B1F ~ B29F
Emboar #500 Fire/Fighting Uncharted Road
Espeon #196 Psychic B1F ~ B29F
Fraxure #611 Dragon Uncharted Road
Gothorita #575 Psychic B1F ~ B29F
Haxorus #612 Dragon B1F ~ B29F; Uncharted Road
Krokorok #552 Dark/Ground B1F ~ B29F
Krookodile #553 Dark/Ground B1F ~ B29F
Mandibuzz #630 Dark/Flying B1F ~ B29F
Musharna #518 Psychic B1F ~ B29F
Pignite #499 Fire/Fighting Uncharted Road
Salamence #373 Dragon/Flying B1F ~ B29F
Sandile #551 Dark/Ground B1F ~ B29F
Tepig #498 Fire Uncharted Road
Thundurus #642 Electric/Flying Golden Chamber
Umbreon #197 Dark B1F ~ B29F

  • Axew, Druddigon, Fraxure, and Haxorus are weak to Dragon and Ice, and have advantages over Dragon.
  • Bisharp is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground. It takes little damage from both Poison and Psychic, and has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.
  • Deino is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It will take little damage from Psychic. It has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Dragon.
  • Emboar and Pignite have weaknesses to Ground, Water, Flying, and Psychic. They are however advantageous over Steel, Bug, Grass, Ice, Normal, Rock, and Dark.
  • Espeon, Gothorita, and Musharna are weak to Ghost, Bug, and Dark, and advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Krokorok, Krookodile, and Sandile are weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and take little damage from Psychic and Electric. They're advantageous over Poison, Rock, Steel, Electric, Fire, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Mandibuzz is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and it takes little damage from Ground and Psychic. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Salamence is weak to Ice (4x), Rock, and Dragon. It will take little damage from Ground, and has type-based advantages over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.
  • Tepig is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and is advantageous over Bug, Ice, Steel, and Grass.
  • Thundurus is weak to Ice and Rock and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Flying, Water, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.
  • Umbreon is weak to Fighting and Bug, takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic.




Smoking Mountain



  • Dungeon Length: 24 floors
  • Dominant Types: Ice, Dragon, Ground, and Dark are all tied, so just say "Various"
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Axew #610 Dragon Uncharted Road
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 24F
Emboar #500 Fire/Fighting 1F ~ 24F; Uncharted Road
Espeon #196 Psychic 1F ~ 24F
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 1F ~ 24F
Flareon #136 Fire 1F ~ 24F
Fraxure #611 Dragon Uncharted Road
Golurk #623 Ghost/Ground 1F ~ 24F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 24F
Gothitelle #576 Psychic 1F ~ 24F
Gothorita #575 Psychic 1F ~ 24F
Haxorus #612 Dragon Uncharted Road
Krokorok #553 Dark/Ground 1F ~ 24F
Krookodile #553 Dark/Ground 1F ~ 24F
Lampent #608 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 24F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 24F
Mamoswine #473 Ground/Steel 1F ~ 24F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 24F
Pignite #499 Fire/Fighting 1F ~ 24F; Uncharted Road
Simisear #514 Fire 1F ~ 24F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 24F
Tepig #498 Fire 1F ~ 24F; Uncharted Road
Thundurus #642 Electric/Flying Golden Chamber

  • Axew, Fraxure, and Haxorus are weak to Dragon and Ice, and have advantages over Dragon.
  • Chandelure, Lampent, and Litwick are weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Ground, and Water, and take little damage from Fighting and Normal. They have type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug. Chandelure (at least) can use Smog, which is Poison-type, does damage, and probably will Poison you. It also knows Confuse Ray, which obviously confuses you.
  • Emboar and Pignite have weaknesses to Ground, Water, Flying, and Psychic. They are however advantageous over Steel, Bug, Grass, Ice, Normal, Rock, and Dark.
  • Espeon, Gothita, Gothorita, and Gothitelle are weak to Ghost, Bug, and Dark, and advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Poison, Electric, Steel, and Ice.
  • Flareon, Pansear, Simisear, and Tepig are weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and are advantageous over Bug, Ice, Steel, and Grass.
  • Golurk is weak to Ghost, Dark, Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric, Normal, and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Electric.
  • Krokorok and Krookodile are weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Psychic and Electric. They're advantageous over Poison, Rock, Steel, Electric, Fire, Ghost, and Psychic. They are notably annoying for using Earthquake, a move that hits everyone in the room for powerful damage - counting STAB, it has an absolute-base 150 Power! - of the Ground type.
  • Mamoswine is weak to Fire, Fighting, Grass, Water, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Electric, Rock, Steel, Poison, Grass, Flying, and Ground. It notably knows Powder Snow. This is an Ice-type line-of-sight move that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and it may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Thundurus is weak to Ice and Rock and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Flying, Water, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.




Worldcore



  • Dungeon Length: 13 floors
  • Dominant Types: Poison and Dragon, but slightly
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes (but they'll just return to Paradise)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire B1F ~ B13F
Munna #517 Psychic B1F ~ B13F
Purugly #432 Normal B1F ~ B13F
Salamence #373 Dragon/Flying B1F ~ B13F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting B1F ~ B13F
Whirlipede #544 Poison/Bug B1F ~ B13F
Zweilous #634 Dark/Dragon B1F ~ B13F

  • Chandelure is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Water, and Ground. It takes little damage from Fighting and Normal, and has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Bug, Grass, and Steel. It has the Flame Body ability, which may burn you if you use a contact move on it. It can also use the possibly-Poison-inducing Smog.
  • Munna is weak to Bug, Dark, and Ghost, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison. It can annoying use Yawn (puts you to Sleep in about two turns), or use Hypnosis and cut out the middleman.
  • Purugly is weak to Fighting, takes little damage from Ghost, and lacks type-based advantages.
  • Salamence is weak to Ice (4x), Dragon, and Rock. It takes little damage from Ground and is advantageous over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.
  • Toxicroak is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying. It is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Whirlipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Zweilous is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, and Dragon.


The Plot Ends




Sectional Flowchart









Wishing Upon A Star



On the other side of 13F, your partner sees a light ahead. Meanwhile, you get to save, so do. You'll then find your partner on the Hill of Universal Order, a sheer cliff overlooking the cosmos. Hydreigon materializes behind your partner, who confirms his location. And so, it is time for the wish...

The stars on the cave ceiling begin to twinkle, first one by one, then en masse... Before twinkling out into darkness? The ground begins to shake - according to Hydreigon, the strain is too much on the universe and space itself is being distorted, that the universe itself is now off-balance! It seems that the distortion will remain small and not affect the whole Pokémon world, but you cannot seem to return, then. Meanwhile, you need to flee, for the distortion will engulf the Hill and not resurface for many years.

Your partner thinks hard about it and remains firm in his place - he will not stop wishing for you to return, even if it costs him his life! ... So, that fixes two things: a wish and a drive behind it. Hydreigon then hesitantly notes that he may have felt your own presence several days ago, that you may be watching them from the human world somehow. Hydreigon looks up in the distance and calls out to you, acknowledging your presence, asking for you to make the final link - if you, too, wish to return, accept the offer.

And, for God's sake, accept the offer! A rejection is indeed permanent! I will not investigate this further, for it quickly invokes a saving of the game right after the rejection, and I personally want my Level 45 Pikachu back!

When you accept, you, too, shout out your desire in your dream... The stars twinkle back into the cave, as do you... You're back in the world of Pokémon. You're home with you and your partner, who collapses to his knees and hugs you in joy...

... *sniffle* Save already.

After one more filler day, you'll learn that you can your partner will be able to evolve - this is pretty much an automatic process as far I understand it. That means level-up based evolutions will probably happen pretty soon. ;) You've also unlocked the remainder of the non-DLC dungeons, including the restriction-based ones. You can finally also freely choose your party, even the Pokémon you control in the dungeon.

So, the dungeons are Miragesands, Cape at the Edge, Slumbering Cave, and Path of No Return. Feel free to do as you will, for this it. Congratulations on concluding the plotline for Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity! Anyways, you're free to go around now and hunt down all of the Pokémon (see Pokémon Details section for more info), hunt down the legendary Pokémon (see Hunting the Legends!), do Magnagate Dungeons, rank up, build, whatever! Again, congrats, and good luck with whatever you decide to do!





Miragesands



  • Dungeon Length: 29 floors
  • Dominant Types: Normal and Fire
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying B1F ~ B29F
Audino #531 Normal B1F ~ B29F
Azurill #298 Normal B1F ~ B29F
Flareon #136 Fire B1F ~ B29F
Lampent #608 Fire/Ghost B1F ~ B29F
Litwick #607 Fire/Ghost B1F ~ B29F
Minccino #572 Normal B1F ~ B29F
Purugly #432 Normal B1F ~ B29F
Simisear #514 Fire B1F ~ B29F
Stoutland #508 Normal B1F ~ B29F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying B1F ~ B29F
Volcarona #629 Fire/Bug B1F ~ B29F
Vullaby #637 Dark/Flying B1F ~ B29F
Watchog #505 Normal B1F ~ B29F

  • Archeops is weak to Water, Steel, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Ice, Bug, Flying, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Audino, Azurill, Minccino, Purugly, Stoutland, and Watchog are all weak to Fighting, take little damage from Ghost, and lack type-based advantages.
  • Flareon and Simisear are weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and have type-based advantages over Bug, Ice, Steel, and Grass.
  • Lampent and Litwick are weak to Rock, Water, Ground, Dark, and Ghost, and take little damage from Normal and Fighting. They are advantageous over Bug, Grass, Ice, Steel, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It has type-based advantages over Fighting, Poison, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Volcarona is weak to Rock (4x), Flying, and Water. It has type-based advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, Steel, Dark, and Psychic.
  • Vullaby is weak to Ice, Rock, and Electric, and takes little damage from both Psychic and Ground. It has type-based advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Fighting, Grass, and Bug.




Cape at the Edge



  • Dungeon Length: 30 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Restrictions: Hunger

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Amoonguss #591 Grass/Poison B1F ~ B30F
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Audino #531 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Azumarill #184 Water B1F ~ B30F
Beartic #614 Ice B1F ~ B30F
Bisharp #625 Dark/Steel B1F ~ B30F
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Carracosta #565 Water/Rock B1F ~ B30F
Chandelure #609 Ghost/Fire B1F ~ B30F
Cofagrigus #563 Ghost B1F ~ B30F
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting B1F ~ B30F
Crustle #558 Bug/Rock B1F ~ B30F
Cryogonal #615 Ice B1F ~ B30F
Druddigon #621 Dragon B1F ~ B30F
Dunsparce #206 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Emboar #500 Fire/Fighting B1F ~ B30F
Espeon #196 Psychic B1F ~ B30F
Excadrill #530 Steel/Ground B1F ~ B30F
Flareon #136 Fire B1F ~ B30F
Garbodor #569 Poison B1F ~ B30F
Gigalith #526 Rock B1F ~ B30F
Glaceon #471 Ice B1F ~ B30F
Golurk #623 Ghost/Ground B1F ~ B30F
Gothitelle #576 Psychic B1F ~ B30F
Haxorus #612 Dragon B1F ~ B30F
Jolteon #135 Electric B1F ~ B30F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug B1F ~ B30F
Klinklang #601 Steel B1F ~ B30F
Krookodile #553 Ground/Dark B1F ~ B30F
Leafeon #470 Grass B1F ~ B30F
Leavanny #542 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B30F
Lilligant #549 Grass B1F ~ B30F
Mamoswine #473 Ground/Ice B1F ~ B30F
Mandibuzz #630 Dark/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Mienshao #620 Fighting B1F ~ B30F
Minccino #572 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Musharna #518 Psychic B1F ~ B30F
Pelipper #279 Water/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Purugly #432 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Quagsire #195 Water/Ground B1F ~ B30F
Raichu #026 Electric B1F ~ B30F
Rampardos #409 Rock B1F ~ B30F
Salamence #373 Dragon/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Samurott #503 Water B1F ~ B30F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison B1F ~ B30F
Scrafty #560 Dark/Fighting B1F ~ B30F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground B1F ~ B30F
Serperior #497 Grass B1F ~ B30F
Simipour #516 Water B1F ~ B30F
Simisage #512 Grass B1F ~ B30F
Simisear #514 Fire B1F ~ B30F
Stoutland #508 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Swanna #581 Water/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Swoobat #528 Psychic/Flying B1F ~ B30F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting B1F ~ B30F
Umbreon #197 Dark B1F ~ B30F
Vaporeon #134 Water B1F ~ B30F
Volcarona #637 Bug/Fire B1F ~ B30F
Watchog #505 Normal B1F ~ B30F
Whimsicott #547 Grass B1F ~ B30F
Zebstrika #523 Electric B1F ~ B30F
Zoroark #571 Dark B1F ~ B30F
Zweilous #634 Dark/Dragon B1F ~ B30F

  • Amoonguss is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic, and is advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.
  • Archeops is weak to Water, Steel, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Bug, Grass, Fire, Ice, and Flying.
  • Audino, Dunsparce, Minccino, Purugly, Stoutland, and Watchog are all weak to Fighting, and all take little damage from Ground. They have no type-based advantages.
  • Azumarill, Vaporeon, Samurott, and Simipour are each weak to Grass and Electric and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Beartic, Cryogonal, and Glaceon are weak to Fire, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. They have type-based advantages over Grass, Dragon, Flying, and Ground. Beartic notably knows Powder Snow and Icy Wind. These are Ice-type line-of-sight moves that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Bisharp is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground. It takes little damage from both Poison and Psychic, and has type-based advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Ice, and Rock.
  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground and Ghost. It has a type advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug.
  • Carracosta is weak to Grass (4x), Electric, Fighting, Ground, and Steel. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Ice, and Flying. He may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Chandelure is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Water, and Ground, and takes little damage from Fighting and Normal. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Steel, Bug, and Grass.
  • Cofagrigus is weak to Ghost and Dark, and takes little damage from Normal and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic.
  • Conkeldurr and Mienshao are weak to Flying and Psychic, and are advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Crustle is weak to Water and Rock, and is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Fire. This Pokémon has the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP. Crustle cam also be annoying because of Shell Smash - it sharply raises its Attack and Special Attack, slightly lowers its Defense and Special Defense, and triples it speed!
  • Druddigon and Haxorus are weak to Dragon and Ice, and have a type-based advantage over Dragon. Note that Druddigon may have the Rough Skin ability, causing users of contact moves against this Pokémon to take 25% ~ 33% of their damage dealt in return. Special- and Status-classed moves do not trigger this ability, though, nor do items.
  • Emboar and Pignite have weaknesses to Ground, Water, Flying, and Psychic. They are however advantageous over Steel, Bug, Grass, Ice, Normal, Rock, and Dark.
  • Espeon, Musharna, and Gothitelle are weak to Ghost, Bug, and Dark, and advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Poison, Electric, Steel, and Ice.
  • Flareon and Simisear are weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and are advantageous over Bug, Ice, Steel, and Grass.
  • Garbodor is weak to Psychic and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass. You want to be quick fighting this - it may have the Weak Armor ability. When you hit it, it may lower its Defense ... then get an additional move per turn!
  • Gigalith and Rampardos are weak to Ground, Steel, Fighting, Grass, and Water. They are advantageous over Flying, Fire, Ice, and Bug. They may have the Sturdy ability, which prevents one-hit kills from full HP. Note that, if the game does mention Sturdy having saved the Pokémon, you may as well just use the generic A Button attack to save yourself some PP.
  • Golurk is weak to Ghost, Dark, Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric, Normal, and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Electric.
  • Jolteon, Zebstrika, and Raichu are weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water. Jolteon may also have the Volt Absorb ability, turning Electric attacks aimed at it into HP. Raichu may have the Static ability, which has a chance of paralyzing those that directly attack it. Finally, Zebstrika may have Lightningrod, which nullifies all Electric attacks around it, then boosts its Special Attack for each one.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Flying, Water, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Klinklang is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and takes little damage from Poison. It has type-based advantages over Rock and Ice.
  • Krookodile is weak to Grass, Water, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Lilligant, Leafeon, Serperior, Whimsicott, and Simisage are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. They have type-based advantages over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Leavanny is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Mamoswine is weak to Fire, Fighting, Grass, Water, and Steel, and takes little damage from Electric. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Electric, Rock, Steel, Poison, Grass, Flying, and Ground. It notably knows Powder Snow. This is an Ice-type line-of-sight move that deals super-effective damage to Grass, Flying, and Ground, and it may also Freeze the Pokémon.
  • Pelipper and Swanna are weak to Electric (4x) and Rock, and take little damage from Ground. They are advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Bug, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Seismitoad and Quagsire are weak to Grass (4x) and take little damage from Electric. They are advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.
  • Salamence is weak to Ice (4x), Rock, and Dragon. It will take little damage from Ground, and has type-based advantages over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.
  • Scolipede is weak to Fire, Rock, Flying, and Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Scrafty is weak to Fighting and Flying, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.
  • Swoobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.
  • Toxicroak is weak to Psychic (4x), Flying, and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass, Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark. Toxicroak is mainly notable for using Revenge - it's a move like Bide that transfers damage dealt to it back to one of your allies, but doubled. This easily one-hit kills. Sadly, there's no real way to prevent the damage ... unless you actually use the Tactics from the status menu to tell everyone to get away!
  • Umbreon and Zoroark are weak to Fighting and Bug, and take little damage from Psychic. They have type-based advantages over Ghost and Psychic. The latter of these have the Illusion ability, which may disguise it as another Pokémon on the floor - note, though, that it still retains their Dark-typing.
  • Volcarona is weak to Rock (4x), Flying, and Water. It has type-based advantages over Ice, Grass, Bug, Steel, Dark, and Psychic.
  • Zweilous is weak to Ice, Dragon, Fighting, and Bug. It takes little damage from Psychic, and is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, and Dragon.




Slumbering Cave



  • Dungeon Length: 99 floors
  • Dominant Types: Poison and Dragon, but slightly
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Restrictions: Hunger, no items, all become Level 5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Azumarill #184 Water B1F ~ B99F
Azurill #298 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Cryogonal #615 Ice B1F ~ B99F
Herdier #507 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Leavanny #542 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Lillipup #506 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Marill #183 Water B1F ~ B99F
Palpitoad #536 Water/Ground B1F ~ B99F
Patrat #504 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground B1F ~ B99F
Sewaddle #540 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Stoutland #508 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Swadloon #541 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Tympole #535 Water B1F ~ B99F
Watchog #505 Normal B1F ~ B99F

  • Azumarill, Marill, and Tympole are weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Azurill, Herdier, Lillipup, Stoutland, Patrat, and Watchog are weak to Fighting, take little damage from Ghost, and lack type-based advantages.
  • Cryogonal is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and advantageous over Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Leavanny, Sewaddle, and Swadloon are weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. They are advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Palpitoad and Seismitoad are weak to Grass (4x) and take little damage from Electric. They are advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.




Path of No Return



  • Dungeon Length: 99 floors
  • Dominant Types: Normal, Water
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Restrictions: Hunger, only leader enters, no items, leader becomes Level 5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Azumarill #184 Water B1F ~ B99F
Azurill #298 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Cryogonal #615 Ice B1F ~ B99F
Herdier #507 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Leavanny #542 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Lillipup #506 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Marill #183 Water B1F ~ B99F
Palpitoad #536 Water/Ground B1F ~ B99F
Patrat #504 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Seismitoad #537 Water/Ground B1F ~ B99F
Sewaddle #540 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Stoutland #508 Normal B1F ~ B99F
Swadloon #541 Grass/Bug B1F ~ B99F
Tympole #535 Water B1F ~ B99F
Watchog #505 Normal B1F ~ B99F

  • Azumarill, Marill, and Tympole are weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Azurill, Herdier, Lillipup, Stoutland, Patrat, and Watchog are weak to Fighting, take little damage from Ghost, and lack type-based advantages.
  • Cryogonal is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and advantageous over Flying, Grass, and Ground.
  • Leavanny, Sewaddle, and Swadloon are weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. They are advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Palpitoad and Seismitoad are weak to Grass (4x) and take little damage from Electric. They are advantageous over Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, and Ground.





Dungeon Index

Looking for a particular dungeon, but not sure where to look for the data? That's understandable, given the formatting nature of the walkthrough and GameFAQs. Here are the dungeons you can find during the game's plot, then. Click on the blue text to go to the corresponding section for the data at time of encounter. I also include the more current info here based on end-game progress. Note that this does not include the Magnagate Dungeons or DLC Dungeons, for they have their own sections.

(With regard to "Return", it is whether you can return to the dungeon after the trip there in the plot, as applicable.)

Dungeon Name/Link Return? Floors SOS Uses Recruit? Enemies Evolve Hunger Items Team Level Limit
Ragged Mountain Yes 5F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Stony Cave Yes B5F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Hazy Pass Yes 8F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Stompstump Peak Yes --- 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Forest Grotto Yes 7F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Mountain Pass Yes 7F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Desolate Canyon Yes 7F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Inflora Forest Yes 8F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Breezy Meadow Yes 8F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Tempting Path Yes 9F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Crags of Lament Yes 9F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Redland Reaches Yes 10F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Eastern Savanna Yes 14F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Telluric Path No 10F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Great Glacier Yes 14F 10 Yes No No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Glacial Underpass No B9F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Glacier Palace No 13F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Grove of Whispers Yes 9F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Frozen Pillar Yes 14F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Kilionea Road No B10F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Forest of Shadows Yes 14F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Daybreak Ridge Yes 6F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Ochre Quarry Yes 13F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Withered Savanna Yes 17F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Holehills Yes 12F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Scorching Desert Yes 10F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Tyrian Maze No B11F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Glacier Palace - Eastern Spire No 12F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Glacier Palace - Western Spire No 12F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Glacier Palace - Great Spire No 5F ? Yes ? No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Windy Shoreline Yes 11F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Canyon Foot Yes 9F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Worldcore Yes B13F 10 Yes Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Miragesands Yes 29F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Silent Tundra Yes B27F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Dreamy Island Yes 26F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Moonlit Forest Yes 29F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Rusty Mountain Yes 25F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Jaws of the Abyss Yes B29F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Smoking Mountain Yes 24F 10 No Yes No Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Cape at the Edge Yes B30F 10 No Yes Yes Yes 1 ~ 4 None
Slumbering Cave Yes B99F 10 No Yes Yes Yes 1 ~ 4 Level 5
Path of No Return Yes B99F 10 No Yes Yes No Leader Level 5




Magnagate Dungeons

Introduction

Early on in the game, you will unlock the ability to search for "Magnagates". Canonically speaking, these are links between the human world and the world of Pokémon. You access this feature from the title menu when you unlock them. From the Magnagate menu, use the top-left option to search for Magnagates.

Obviously, there are no true links to the Pokémon world from our own; that'd be too weird. =P Instead, you will use the Nintendo 3DS's outer two 3D cameras to look for round objects. Once you have an object centered in your "sights", press the A Button and you'll proceed into the dungeon. Depending on the size of the object used and its color, you'll find different dungeons and different difficulties. There is no concrete data on what triggers what by my knowledge, so you'll have to work from luck, unless you have something I oughta know about.

So, what's the point of using a Magnagate? Well, you do get more dungeons than the main game or the DLC dungeons give you, so that always is a plus. You get to play as random Pokémon (typically starter Pokémon), so that helps you adapt. You also get to keep the items you find in a dungeon for the main game, and sometimes even get a special reward for doing well! (This special award is in addition to the multiple items you find on the boss floor at the end of a dungeon, and you also do keep the other items and money you have at the end!) You even can replay through dungeons repeatedly, although not in the demo version, after you discover them!

Are you having trouble getting a Magnagate to work? Below is a collage of stuff that I've tested to work properly. And, yes, that is a Shelgon, that is a Device sprite, and that is a Geo Pebble sprite. Don't expect me to alter this - this is a mere sample, and it's not up for debate whether these are going to be added to or not. Again, dungeons have some dependency on the size and color of circular objects.

^l1|



Challenging Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 7 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5 (ironically)

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 6F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 7F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 6F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 6F
Mienfoo #620 Fighting 7F (boss)
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 6F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 7F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (7F): Mienfoo, Gothita, and Woobat

  • Mienfoo is weak to Flying and Psychic, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

First things first. As Woobat is standing right in front of you, disabling him with an attack or two should be child's play. Gothita should be your next target, having the tendency to use Confusion and/or DoubleSlap - add that into an ability to rage and you've got trouble, so quickly take her out. Status-inducing items will help greatly. Mienfoo will go last, but that shouldn't be too hard - it's unlikely for Mienfoo to have an advantage over any of the starter Pokémon you use in Magnagate Dungeons. The only problem you'll have with Meinfoo is its ability to use Detect, which allows temporal immunity - but that's very brief, anyways.



Glinting Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 13 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 8F
Drilbur #529 Ground 3F ~ 12F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 13F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 12F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 12F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 12F
Swadloon #541 Grass/Bug 13F (boss)
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 12F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping on 8F, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (13F): Swadloon and Gothita

  • Swadloon is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass. It notably has the capability to use Razor Leaf (Grass-type line-of-sight move) and String Shot (halves movement speed).
  • Gothita is weak to Ghost, Bug, and Dark, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.

When it comes to this boss, you'll probably have it good if you started with Tepig and Oshawott here as I did. Then you simply need to use Ember on Swadloon a few times and that more or less finishes the fight. You should focus first on Swadloon, as he is your main threat. Beware of Gothita, though, afterwards - Gothita will go into a mad rage, probably powering up and using Doubleslap to take off a huge chunk of health. If you've got some Stun Seeds in your Bag, that'll keep her off your tail long enough for you to heal. During that time, it wouldn't kill you to grab the nearby Rawst Berry and money, either.



Healing Maze

  • Dungeon Length: 13 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 4/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying 6F, 9F
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 12F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 13F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 12F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 12F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 12F
Sandile #551 Ground/Dark 13F (boss)
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 13F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping on 6F or 9F, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (13F): Sandile, Woobat, and Gothita

  • Sandile is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Ice, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It has a type-based advantage over Fire, Rock, Electric, Poison, Steel, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

This fight will be pretty hard if you're unable to deal with statuses or type-based problems. Sandile is actually not going to be your priority; he's relatively negligible. Firstly, you'll want to get rid of Gothita. Her tendency to use the STAB-boosted Confusion, which can also deal out confusion statuses, is deadly in this fight. You may want to disable her with something like a Totter Seed or, preferably, a Stun Seed that will keep her immobile until you're ready for her to be dealt with. If you can't petrify Gothita, kill.

Woobat may as well go next, being the weakest of the three. Sandile will be a little tougher, but you shouldn't have too many problems with him beyond his ability to create a Sandstorm, which will damage all non-Ground/Rock/Steel types for a while. And never neglect the items on the dungeon floor. I mean, sure, don't go out of your way for them and get killed, but if you're going to move around, why not grab an Oran Berry, for example?



Joyous Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 5 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 4/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 4F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 5F (boss)
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 4F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 4F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 4F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 5F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (5F): Gothita and Woobat

  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

This fight should begin with you trying to disable Gothita. Gothita is a pain in dungeons - especially Magnagate dungeons where you have no control of who you use or their power - because of Confusion, and her tendency to rage when her ally(s) get KO'ed. Once disabled, you should then try to take her down - make her go first! Disabling Woobat may be of slight help, too. After Gothita, Woobat will be a piece of cake.

Don't forget the items on your way out!



Marvel Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 10F (boss)
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 10F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 10F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 9F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 9F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 9F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (10F): Sandile and Woobat

  • Sandile is weak to Grass, Water, Fighting, Ice, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It has a type-based advantage over Fire, Rock, Electric, Poison, Steel, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

This boss is fairly easy to deal with - at least, it was for me, having gotten Oshawott and Axew. If your AI allies have Water-type moves, make them the only allowed offensive moves and try to stick them near Sandile (this means you, Oshawott); same idea goes for Dark-type moves or Electric-type ones and Woobat (Axew (with Assurance) and Pikachu, obviously). Beyond that, there's not a lot to say about this fight - just abuse type weaknesses and you'll be okay.



Mystical Maze

  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 10F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 9F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 9F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 9F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 9F
Swadloon #541 Grass/Bug 10F (boss)
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 9F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (10F): Swadloon and Drilbur (x2)

  • Swadloon is weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. It is advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass. It notably has the capability to use Razor Leaf (Grass-type line-of-sight move) and String Shot (halves movement speed).
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.

This fight shouldn't be too hard to deal with. The Drilbur should probably go first, since they usually don't rage after an ally's defeat - not to mention they're pretty weak to begin with and can often be taken out with starter Pokémon. Swadloon has the same problem, but moreso with Fire, so, if you have Tepig, that's his time to shine. Shouldn't be hard at all.



Peculiar Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 10F (boss)
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 10F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 10F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 9F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 9F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 9F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (10F): Drilbur, Gothita, and Joltik

  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.

With regard to this boss, you probably should begin focusing on Gothita, as per the usual. Confusion is annoying, and DoubleSlap is worse if she rages - capable of one-hit kills! Joltik should be the next one - he's the weakest. His main problems come with Thunder Wave for Paralysis, String Shot for halved movement speed, and Screech for harshly lowered Defense. Drilbur is physically the least competent and can be handled relatively easily afterwards.



Primitive Maze

  • Dungeon Length: 5 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 4F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 4F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 5F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 4F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 4F
Panpour #515 Water 5F (boss)
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 4F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (5F): Panpour and Gothita

  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric, and is advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.

If there's any Pokémon to disable early on, it's Gothita. As with some of the other Magnagate Dungeons, Gothita can use Confusion, a move that may ... well, cause confusion. This is a deadly status in pretty much any battle where it cannot be cured, and Heal Seeds are fairly rare in these dungeons. A Stun Seed or something similar will work well enough to keep her down until Panpour is dealt with. That's a minor inconvenience at best by comparison.

Just beware of Gothita's tendency to rage when you defeat Panpour. Combined with her DoubleSlap, that sucker is deadly - it can easily one-hit kill most Level 12 Pokémon at that power - and the rage nullifies stuff like Stun Seeds' petrification status. The best thing to do would be maybe stun her after she rages, or use long-range attacks, or something.



Shining Maze

  • Dungeon Length: 7 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 3/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 7F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 7F (boss)
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 6F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 6F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 6F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 6F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (7F): Gothita and Drilbur

  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.

This fight should begin with you trying to disable Gothita. Gothita is a pain in dungeons - especially Magnagate dungeons where you have no control of who you use or their power - because of Confusion, and her tendency to rage when her ally(s) get KO'ed. Once disabled, you should then try to take her down - make her go first! Disabling Drilbur may be of slight help, too. After Gothita, Drilbur will be a piece of cake.

Don't forget the items on your way out!



Treasure Cavern

  • Dungeon Length: 6 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: No
  • Dungeon Difficulty: 4/5

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Braviary #628 Normal/Flying Random and rare
Drilbur #529 Ground 1F ~ 5F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 5F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 6F (boss)
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 6F
Minccino #572 Normal 1F ~ 5F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 5F

  • Braviary is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ghost or Ground. It technically has a type-based advantage over Fighting, Grass, and Bug. However, when you find it sleeping, you'll also notice that it doesn't awaken when you approach. Moves are fairly uneffective on this beast, too - I only got it to awaken with a Blast Seed. I'd avoid it entirely, advantage or not.
  • Drilbur is weak to Water, Grass, and Ice, and takes little damage from Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Steel, Rock, Poison, and Electric.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug, and is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Minccino is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type advantages.
  • Woobat is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

BOSS (6F): Joltik and Klink (x2)

  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and is advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.

This is actually one of the easier Magnagate boss fights. If you have Tepig, you should be able to deal with the both of these quite readily. Axew would also be immensely helpful with Dragon Rage (always 30 damage). Otherwise, you'll want to focus your efforts first on Joltik, as he has an annoying tendency to use status-inflicting moves to reduce your speed or to paralyze you - against three Pokémon, this greatly will inhibit you! Klink can be more readily ignored, so don't worry about him until Joltik is gone.





DLC Dungeons

Release Data

These are all the downloadable dungeons I know of at the time of this game's release. These DLC dungeons are obtained through the DLC Corner, owned by Foongus, in the Post Town. These dungeons are actually available for free for roughly one month and one week after their release (1/1/2013 for Japan, 4/30/2013 for the U.S. for launch DLC dungeons), after which the Costs begin to apply.

Dungeon Name Release Dates Cost Unlocked When? Dungeon Length? Recruitable Pokémon? Special Items?
Ivy Park 3/24/2013 (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) $2.00 (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 15 floors Yes (namely Snivy) Grass Device
[[Kecleon's Bazaar]] ????? (U.S.) 12/7/2012 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 200 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 20 floors Yes Many Kecleon shops with rare TMs
[[Kibakiba Rock]] ????? (U.S.) 12/7/2012 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 13 floors Yes (namely Axew) N/A
Pika Land 3/24/2013 (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) $2.00 (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 15 floors Yes (namely Pikachu) Electric Device
PokéForest 3/24/2013 (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) $2.00 (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 10 floors Yes N/A
Scalchop Beach 3/24/2013 (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) $2.00 (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 10 floors Yes (namely Oshawott) Water Device
Skill - Treasure ????? (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 200 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 15 floors Yes N/A
[[Strongest Trail]] ????? (U.S.) 12/7/2012 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 250 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 60 floors Yes (many are rare!) Proof of Fortitude
[[Sweets Road]] ????? (U.S.) 1/11/2013 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 200 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 20 floors Yes Many stat- and Hunger-boosters
Training Mountain ????? (U.S.) 11/23/2012 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 200 ¥ (Japan) Post-Credits 20 floors Yes N/A
[[Ultimate Dungeon]] ????? (U.S.) 1/11/2013 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 300 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 99 floors Yes Proof of Courage
[[Warm Mountain]] ????? (U.S.) 1/11/2013 (Japan) ????? (U.S.) 150 ¥ (Japan) Anytime? 15 floors Yes (namely Tepig) N/A


Ivy Park

  • Dungeon Length: 15 floors
  • Dominant Types: Grass
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: This dungeon contains a Grass Device.

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Amoonguss #591 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Cottonee #546 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Foongus #590 Grass/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Glaceon #471 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Gurdurr #533 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Leavanny #542 Grass/Bug 1F ~ 14F
Lilligant #549 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Mienshao #620 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Petilil #548 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Scolipede #545 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Scraggy #559 Dark/Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Sewaddle #540 Grass/Bug 1F ~ 14F
Simisage #512 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Snivy #495 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Swadloon #541 Grass/Bug 1F ~ 14F
Timburr #532 Fighting 1F ~ 14F
Trubbish #568 Poison 1F ~ 14F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Whimsicott #547 Grass 1F ~ 14F
Whirlipede #544 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 14F

  • Foongus and Amoonguss are weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Psychic. They're advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.
  • Croagunk is weak to Psychic (4x), Ground, and Flying. It has a type-based advantage over Grass, Normal, Rock, Steel, Dark, and Ice.
  • Glaceon is weak to Fire, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. It is advantageous over Flying, Ground, and Grass.
  • Pansage, Snivy, Simisage, Petilil, Lilligant, Cottonee, and Whimsicott are weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Bug, and Poison. They are advantageous over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Timburr, Gurdurr, Mienfoo, and Mienshao are weak to Flying and Psychic, and are advantageous over Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.
  • Sewaddle, Swadloon, and Leavanny are weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Bug, Poison, and Rock. They are advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, Psychic, Dark, and Grass.
  • Venipede, Whirlipede, and Scolipede are weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. They are advantageous over Psychic, Grass, and Dark.
  • Scraggy is weak to Fighting and Flying, and takes little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.


Pika Land

  • Dungeon Length: 15 floors
  • Dominant Types: Electric
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: This dungeon contains an Electric Device

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Beartic #614 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Blitzle #522 Electric 1F ~ 14F
Cryogonal #615 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Cubchoo #613 Ice 1F ~ 14F
Dwebble #557 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 14F
Emolga #587 Electric/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Galvantula #596 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 14F
Jolteon #135 Electric 1F ~ 14F
Joltik #595 Electric/Bug 1F ~ 14F
Mamoswine #473 Ice/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Pichu #172 Electric 1F ~ 14F
Pikachu #025 Electric 1F ~ 14F
Piloswine #221 Ice/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Sewaddle #540 Bug/Grass 1F ~ 14F
Swadloon #541 Bug/Grass 1F ~ 14F
Swinub #220 Ice/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Whirlipede #544 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 14F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 14F

  • Pichu, Pikachu, Blitzle, and Jolteon are weak only to Ground, and have a type-based advantage over Water and Flying.
  • Swinub, Piloswine, and Mamoswine are weak to Fire, Fighting, Steel, Water, and Grass, and take little damage from Electric. They are advantageous over Flying, Ground, Grass, Rock, Steel, Fire, and Electric.
  • Sewaddle and Swadloon are weak to Fire (4x), Flying (4x), Ice, Poison, and Rock. They are advantageous over Grass, Dark, Water, Psychic, Rock, and Ground.
  • Venipede and Whirlipede are weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. They have advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.
  • Dwebble is weak to Water and Steel, and is advantageous over Dark, Psychic, Grass, Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice.
  • Emolga is weak to Ice and Rock, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Flying, Water, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.
  • Joltik and Galvantula are weak to Fire and Rock, and are advantageous over Grass, Psychic, Dark, Flying, and Water.
  • Cubchoo, Beartic, and Cryogonal are weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting. They have an advantage over Flying, Grass, and Ground.


PokéForest

  • Dungeon Length: 10 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: The main goal of this dungeon is to cross it and go through it while collecting as much money as you can. Preferably, you are to do so without waking other sleeping Pokémon. Like in other Mystery Dungeon games, Pokémon are awakened if you get on any of the eight tiles surrounding them or otherwise attack them. This will be especially harder at lower levels due to the relative strength of the resident Pokémon.

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Bisharp #625 Dark/Steel 6F ~ 9F
Cofagrigus #563 Ghost 6F ~ 9F
Excadrill #530 Ground/Steel 6F ~ 9F
Garbodor #569 Poison 6F ~ 9F
Golurk #623 Ground/Ghost 6F ~ 9F
Gothita #574 Psychic 1F ~ 5F
Joltik #595 Bug/Electric 1F ~ 5F
Klinklang #601 Steel 6F ~ 9F
Woobat #527 Psychic/Flying 1F ~ 5F

  • Bisharp is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground, and takes little damage from Psychic and Poison. It has an advantage over Psychic, Ghost, Rock, and Ice.
  • Cofagrigus is weak to Ghost and Dark, and takes little damage from Normal and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost and Psychic.
  • Excadrill is weak to Water, Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and takes little damage from Poison and Electric. It has an advantage over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, and Ice.
  • Garbodor is weak to Psychic and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Gothita is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug. It is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.
  • Joltik is weak to Fire and Rock, and has an advantage over Dark, Grass, Psychic, Flying, and Water.
  • Klinklang is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and takes little damage from Poison. It is advantageous over Rock and Ice.
  • Woobat is weak to Ghost, Dark, Electric, Ice, and Rock, and takes little damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Poison, Fighting, Grass, and Bug.


Scalchop Beach

  • Dungeon Length: 15 floors
  • Dominant Types: Water
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: This dungeon contains a Water Device

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Archen #566 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Archeops #567 Rock/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Azumarill #184 Water 1F ~ 14F
Bisharp #625 Dark/Steel 1F ~ 14F
Bouffalant #626 Normal 1F ~ 14F
Carracosta #565 Water/Rock 1F ~ 14F
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 14F
Ducklett #580 Water/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Marill #183 Water 1F ~ 14F
Oshawott #501 Water 1F ~ 14F
Palpitoad #536 Water/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 14F
Pelipper #279 Water/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Quagsire #195 Water/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Rufflet #627 Normal/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Simipour #516 Water 1F ~ 14F
Swanna #581 Water/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Tirtouga #564 Water/Rock 1F ~ 14F
Tympole #535 Water 1F ~ 14F
Umbreon #197 Dark 1F ~ 14F
Vaporeon #134 Water 1F ~ 14F
Vullaby #629 Dark/Flying 1F ~ 14F
Wooper #194 Water/Ground 1F ~ 14F
Zorua #570 Dark 1F ~ 14F

  • Bisharp is weak to Fighting (4x), Fire, and Ground, and takes little damage from Psychic and Poison. It has an advantage over Psychic, Ghost, Rock, and Ice.
  • Vaporeon, Oshawott, Marill, Azumarill, Simipour, Tympole, and Panpour are weak to Electric and Grass, and they all also have advantages over Rock, Ground, and Fire.
  • Palpitoad, Wooper, and Quagsire are weak to Grass (4x) only. They take little damage from Electric. Theyh ave advantages against Rock, Ground, Fire, Electric, Poison, and Steel.
  • Tirtouga and Carracosta are weak to Grass (4x), Fighting, Electric, and Ground. They are advantageous over Fire, Ground, Rock, Flying, Bug, and Ice.
  • Zorua and Umbreon are weak to Fighting and Bug, and take little damage from Psychic. They are advantageous over Psychic and Ghost.
  • Swanna, Ducklett, and Pelipper are weak to Electric (4x) and Rock. They take little damage from Ground, and are advantageous over Fire, Ground, Rock, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.
  • Archen and Archeops are weak to Water, Electric, Ice, and Steel, and take little damage from Ground. These two fossil Pokémon are advantageous over Bug, Ice, Flying, Fire, Fighting, and Grass.
  • Bouffalant is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages.
  • Rufflet is weak to Electric, Rock, and Ice, and takes little damage from Ghost and Ground. It has type-based advantages over Grass, Bug, and Fighting.
  • Deino is weak to Fighting, Bug, Ice, and Dragon, and will take little damage from Psychic. It is advantageous over Dragon, Psychic, and Ghost.
  • Vullaby is weak to Rock, Ice, and Electric, and takes little damage from Psychic or Ground. It has advantages over Psychic, Ghost, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.


Skill - Treasure

  • Dungeon Length: 15 floors
  • Dominant Types: Various
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: The main purpose of this dungeon is to obtain the various chests so that Rampardos at the Open Box Store in the Post Town will open them for various items at the cost of 150 Poké.
   
RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Deino #633 Dark/Dragon 1F ~ 15F
Dwebble #557 Bug/Rock 1F ~ 15F
Klink #599 Steel 1F ~ 15F
Litwick #607 Ghost/Fire 1F ~ 15F
Panpour #515 Water 1F ~ 15F
Pansage #511 Grass 1F ~ 15F
Pansear #513 Fire 1F ~ 15F
Roggenrola #524 Rock 1F ~ 15F
Trubbish #568 Poison 1F ~ 15F
Venipede #543 Bug/Poison 1F ~ 15F

  • Deino is weak to Fighting, Bug, Ice, and Dragon. It takes little damage from Psychic and has an advantage over Ghost, Psychic, and Dragon.
  • Dwebble is weak to Water and Steel, and is advantageous over Dark, Psychic, Grass, Flying, Bug, Fire, and Ice.
  • Klink is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and takes little damage from Poison. Other than that, it also resists all but Water and Electric. It has an advantage over Rock and Ice.
  • Litwick is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark. It will take little damage from Normal and Fighting. It is advantageous over Ice, Steel, Grass, Bug, Ghost, and Psychic.
  • Panpour is weak to Grass and Electric, and is advantageous over Rock, Water, and Fire.
  • Pansage is weak to Flying, Fire, Ice, Poison, and Bug, and is advantageous over Rock, Water, and Ground.
  • Pansear is weak to Rock, Ground, and Water, and is advantageous over Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug.
  • Roggenrola is weak to Ground, Steel, Fighting, Grass, and Water, and is advantageous over Flying, Ice, Bug, and Fire.
  • Trubbish is weak to Psychic and Ground, and is advantageous over Grass.
  • Venipede is weak to Fire, Flying, Ice, Rock, and Psychic. It has advantages over Dark, Psychic, and Grass.


Training Mountain

  • Dungeon Length: 20 floors
  • Dominant Types: Fighting
  • Pokémon Recruits?: Yes
  • Other Notes?: None

RESIDENT POKÉMON DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Which Floors?
Conkeldurr #534 Fighting 9F ~ 20F
Croagunk #453 Poison/Fighting 1F ~ 11F
Gurdurr #533 Fighting 1F ~ 11F
Krokorok #552 Ground/Dark 9F ~ 20F
Mienfoo #619 Fighting 1F ~ 11F
Mienshao #620 Fighting 9F ~ 20F
Purugly #432 Normal 1F ~ 11F
Scrafty #560 Dark/Fighting 9F ~ 20F
Scraggy #559 Dark/Fighting 1F ~ 11F
Timburr #532 Fighting 1F ~ 11F
Toxicroak #454 Poison/Fighting 9F ~ 20F
Zebstrika #523 Electric 9F ~ 20F

  • Purugly is weak to Fighting and takes little damage from Ghost. It lacks type-based advantages.
  • Croagunk and Toxicroak are weak to Psychic (4x), Flying, and Ground. They are advantageous over Grass, Ice, Rock, Normal, Dark, and Steel.
  • Zebstrika is weak to Ground. It has advantages to Water and Flying.
  • Mienfoo, Mienshao, Timburr, Gurdurr, and Conkeldurr are weak to Flying and Psychic. They have type-based advantages over Normal, Ice, Rock, Dark, and Steel.
  • Krokorok is weak to Water, Grass, Ice, Fighting, and Bug, and takes little damage from Electric and Psychic. It has advantages over Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, Poison, Psychic, and Ghost.
  • Scraggy and Scrafty are weak to Fighting and Flying, and take little damage from Psychic. They are advantageous over Psychic, Ghost, Normal, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Steel.




Paradise Minigames

Introduction

Once you begin to be able to expand the Pokémon Paradise, you will be most of the way to unlocking the two main minigames of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity. (Victini and his V-Wheel contain another - it's automatic, though, but you can see the basics by going to the section "Victini and the V-Wave!".)

The two minigames are found in the various facilities of the Paradise. You must first prepare land, then build the facility. You can see the Pokémon Paradise Stores section for more on this process, though Gurdurr will also teach it to you. The main point of this section is to teach you how to play these games, which can yield useful items, even the minigame-exclusive Evolution Items!



Beartic Slide




Facility Costs




  • Requirements: Gold Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 3,000 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Stone Slabs
    • Three Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost: N/A

  • Upgrade #2 Cost: N/A




Basics of the Game



For 100 Poké, you'll be allowed to play a minigame with Beartic. It requires the use of the Touch Screen, and the use of the stylus is therefore preferred over something as imprecise as, say, your finger. You will get prizes for doing good, based on the number of points - less than 1,000 earns you nothing, 1,000 ~ 2,000 is something, 2,000 ~ 2,500 is something better, and over 2,500 is something great.

You'll use the stylus to flick star-emblemed hockey pucks into the hole on the top screen. There are three types of pucks - small ones are worth 30 points, medium-sized ones are worth 50, and large ones are worth 100, which averages out to around 60 points per puck. (Yes, pucks come in relatively equal quantities all-around.) You get 60 seconds to shoot them into the hole. Do note that you can use the pucks to knock others into the hole, but it's not recommended as an actual strategy so much as a "eh, let's get 100 points by knocking this one in instead of the otherwise 30".

Unlike the Sunken Treasure minigame, you can play as much as you want each day ... so long as you have the money! ;)



Sunken Treasure




Facility Costs




  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Three Fresh Herbs
    • Three Precious Branches

  • Upgrade #1 Cost: N/A

  • Upgrade #2 Cost: N/A




Basics of the Game



^sr5| For a small fee of zero Poké, you can play this game once daily. In playing this game, you will control a Starmie (otherwise not in this game) to help him get the various chests underwater. There are three types of treasure chests - red, blue, and black - respectively representing the rarity of the treasure within the chest. Stones and Chinchou (also not in this game otherwise) will come by - if you touch them, you lose a chest, starting with your rarest chests, so watch out! To navigate Starmie, you will use the gyroscope in the Nintendo 3DS - basically, tilt the 3DS in the direction you want Starmie to go.

To those unfamiliar with Pokémon games, look in the nearby screenshot. The purplish star with the red gem is Starmie. One of the dark-blue things just above Starmie would be a chest - this particular one is a blue chest, but note that they can also be red or black. The thing near the top of the screen with the rope is a stone. The light-blue thing below Starmie, with the yellowish antennae, is a Chinchou. If you look carefully between Starmie and the rightmost chest, you'll also see a swirling thing - one of the whirlpools I mentioned earlier. Got that?

The navigational system is a bit odd, but it is basically works like this. Imagnie the two screens on the 3DS as Starmie's ... face, gem, whatever you prefer. Starmie moves in the direction his gem faces. Therefore, if you tilt the 3DS so the screens face up, then Starmie goes up; to the right, Starmie goes right, and so on.

This game will end after you reach a depth of 50 units. There is no particular unit given, and time itself is not exact, because there are various whirlpools in the water. This will basically blow you in the direction of the big end of the vortex, so some will actually bring you towards the surface. After the game ends, you will receive the treasure from the chests, and then you can go on your way.




Hunting the Legends!

Introduction

The series of Pokémon is quite well-known for having a large number of legendary Pokémon, Pokémon who are so powerful as to be banned from most official competition in the mainstream games and certain sidequests such as the Battle Tower. However, in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon, there rarely are such restrictions, making the legendary Pokémon very much worth trying to recruit into your party - with their nearly-unmatched power and stats, they make the game much more palatable to those who have trouble with difficulty. Plus, they just look pretty darn cool. =P

This section is designed to try and teach you how to find the legendary Pokémon. These Pokémon are a bit harder to find than in previous Pokémon Mystery Dungeon titles - whereas in them you could probably just get a certain Wonder Mail and beat a certain dungeon, here you find some automatically, some you find at random, and some, of course, are simply found by beating them in specific dungeons. Some aren't even recruitable, but are here for the sake of completionism.



Automatic Recruits

Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Start Level How to Recruit
Keldeo #647 Water/Fighting Level 50 Rescue from Glacier Palace and finish the game.
Meloetta #648 Normal/Psychic Level 15 Speak with Meloetta after opening the Musical Paradise in the post-credits.
Virizion #640 Grass/Fighting Level 20 Joins early on during a plot event; no need to worry.


Random Finds

Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Start Level How to Recruit
Landorus #645 Ground/Flying Level 70 Random find on Breezy Meadow, 8F.
Thundurus #642 Electric/Flying Level 40 Golden Chamber's deepest part - via Rusty Mountain, Jaws of the Abyss, or Smoking Mountain.
Tornadus #641 Flying Level 40 Golden Chamber's deepest part - via Dreamy Island, Moonlit Forest, or Silent Tundra.

Since you'll have to battle these Pokémon to recruit them, it would be a good thing to know their weaknesses and such. I will also note that they, being legendary, are a bit harder to recruit than most Pokémon - you may want to bring the various "Gift" items to help you recruit them. Flying Gift works for all of them. Electric Gift and Ground Gift additionally will work for Thundurus and Landorus, respectively.

  • Landorus is weak to Ice (4x) and Water, and takes little damage from both Electric and Ground. It has type-based advantages over Fire, Electric, Rock, Steel, Poison, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Thundurus is weak to Ice and Rock, and takes little damage from Ground. It has a type-based advantage over Water, Flying, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.
  • Tornadus is weak to Electric, Ice, and Rock, and takes little damage from Ground. It has a type-based advantage over Grass, Bug, and Fighting.


Royal-Rank Missions

The remainder of the Musketeer set of legendaries (Cobalion and Terrakion) will not be found until you reach the Royal Rank in the Pokémon Paradise. At that point, you may see missions on the noticeboards coming from either Cobalion or Terrakion. Complete this mission and the Pokémon will join your team.

Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Start Level How to Recruit
Cobalion #638 Steel/Fighting Level 45 Complete his randomly-found mission while at Royal Rank.
Terrakion #639 Rock/Fighting Level 45 Complete his randomly-found mission while at Royal Rank.


Special Cameos

The remainder of the legendary Pokémon are not known by any means by me to be recruitable. However, they do make special cameos you can find through the leftmost noticeboard in the Pokémon Paradise. These will take you to a small dungeon - too small to be worth putting in the walkthroughs, as it is just really a single room where you can fight the Pokémon to complete the mission. The mission will be on the left board of the Pokemon Paradise. Unlike the other missions that say "Buried Ruins" as the location, you'll get a different one; you will also have a title, "Legend of the Mysterious Ruins".

Pokémon Species Pokémon # Pokémon Type Pokémon Location
Ho-Oh (shiny Forme) #250 Fire/Flying Eternal Ruins
Kyurem (normal Forme) #646 Ice/Dragon Hoarfrost Tower
Kyurem (Black Forme) #646 Ice/Dragon Turbulent Tor
Kyurem (White Forme) #646 Ice/Dragon Deserted Hoarfrost Tower
Lugia #249 Psychic/Flying Seasound Ruins
Reshiram #643 Fire/Dragon Ivory Peak
Zekrom #644 Electric/Dragon Black Edge

Since you'll have to battle these Pokémon, it may help to know their various weaknesses:

  • Ho-Oh is weak to Rock (4x), Water, and Electric. It takes little damage from Ground. It has a type-based advantage over Ice, Grass, Steel, Bug, and Fighting. It is only sometimes Shiny, so note that.
  • Kyurem's several Formes share the same type data. They are weak to Dragon, Fighting, Rock, and Steel, and have type-based advantages over Dragon, Flying, Ground, Grass, and Dragon. White Kyurem may also know Fusion Flare (super-effective to Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug), and Black Kyurem may also know Fusion Bolt (super-effective to Water and Flying).
  • Lugia is weak to Ghost, Dark, Rock, Ice, and Electric. It takes little damage from Ground. It has an advantage over Fighting, Poison, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.
  • Reshiram is weak to Rock, Ground, and Dragon. It has a type-based advantage over Ice, Grass, Bug, Steel, and Dragon.
  • Zekrom is weak to Ground, Ice, and Dragon. It has a type-based advantage over Water, Flying, and Dragon.




Team Skills

In previous Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, the Pokémon in your party obtained a varying set of special abilities unique to the side-series called "IQ Skills". These were based on the Pokémon's IQ, which was raised by the eating of Gummis and other such items. Additionally, Pokémon often were divided into special groups so that only a few Pokémon could get some IQ Skills, and others could not get the exact same skill set.

This has been replaced in lieu of the "Team Skill". Team Skills are a bit different than IQ Skills. In most cases, they affect all of the Pokémon in the party, so long as they are fitting a certain demographic (i.e. partners, but not the main character). They are intially on and should always remain so, because they are always beneficial to you, and they can be found by opening chests found randomly in the dungeons.

Below is the listing of the Team Skills we know of. Take note that most of these have been shoddily translated from a Japanese game via Google Translate.

  • Cover Skill: If the main Pokémon's HP is low (less than ~33%), an ally may take damage for him.
  • Critical Skill: Critical hits become more likely for you to land.
  • House Skill: Makes you aware of any Monster Houses on the floor where you may get ambushed by many enemies.
  • Intimidation Skill: Your opponent may be unable to attack if next to you or your allies (if it can cringe).
  • Item Skill: Tells you how many items are on this particular dungeon floor.
  • Last-Minute Skill: Raises evasion when HP is low (below around ~33%).
  • Meal Skill: Higher recovery of Hunger and possible PP recovery when eating a food item, such as a Berry or Seed.
  • PP Recovery Skill: PP is recovered as you progress between dungeon floors.
  • Prevention Skill: The main partner cannot become statused if an ally is also statused.
  • Range Skill: Increases how far thrown items (e.g. Geo Pebble, Iron Thorn) go.
  • Reason Skill: You cannot attack your allies when you are confused.
  • Recovery Skill: Makes you recover even more HP as you walk around the dungeon.
  • Retaliating Skill: Increases Attack, Special Attack, and Accuracy temporarily if a partner is defeated.
  • Second Time Skill: If you fail with a move once, it will be more accurate if you use it again on the next turn.
  • Shop Skill: Makes you aware of any Kecleon shops on the floor.
  • Slipthrough Skill: Moves and items only hit the desired targets.
  • Sneaking Skill: You can walk by sleeping Pokémon in the dungeons and they won't awaken until you attack.
  • Spatial Skill: Shows you the shape of the dungeon floor.
  • Stairs Skill: Lets you know where to find the stairs on the floor.
  • Sturdy Skill: If at full HP, you will remain at 1 HP if an attack would otherwise KO you.
  • Tough Skill: You may survive any attack that would KO you, regardless of HP prior, with 1 HP.
  • Trap Break Skill: Traps you trigger may break when you step on them.
  • Unchanging Skill: Stops opponents from evolving.




Items Listings

Berries

Cheri Berry

  • Effects: Cures Paralysis status; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons).
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Chesto Berry

  • Effects: Cures Sleep status; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons). If the Pokémon is already awake when eating this item, it gains immunity from Sleep, Napping, Yawning, or Nightmare statuses until the next floor.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Oran Berry

  • Effects: Restores up to 100 HP; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons).
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Pecha Berry

  • Effects: Cures Poisoned and Badly Poisoned statuses; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons).
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Rawst Berry

  • Effects: Cures Burned status; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons).
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Sitrus Berry

  • Effects: Fully heals HP; increases max HP (by ~2 points) if HP is full; restores the Hunger counter by five (in applicable dungeons).
  • Shop Cost: 2,000 Poké




Seeds

Blast Seed

  • Effects: Damages the enemy you are directly facing next to you for 50 damage; can be thrown for 35 damage. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons if eaten.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Blinker Seed

  • Effects: Temporarily makes it impossible for the user to see the terrain. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Doom Seed

  • Effects: Lowers the target's Level by 1, unless the target is already Level 1. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 60 Poké



Encourage Seed

  • Effects: Induces the Encouraged status. This means that the Pokémon's moves will always hit and its critical-hit rate is boosted. This effect is temporal, but will last longer if more party members are in the Encouraged status. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Eyedrop Seed

  • Effects: Makes all traps visible. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Golden Seed

  • Effects: Raises the eater's Level by 5, up to Level 100. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 5,000 Poké



Heal Seed

  • Effects: Cures all status ailments. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Joy Seed

  • Effects: Raises the eater's Level 1, unless it is already Level 100. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 15 Gold Bars



Life Seed

  • Effects: Raises the eater's max HP by ~3 points. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Quick Seed

  • Effects: Increases the user's movement rate temporarily by one more move per turn, up to four moves. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Plain Seed

  • Effects: Only used to fill the eater's Hunger count by 5 points in applicable dungeons. Often the remains of a used Reviver Seed.
  • Shop Cost: 10 Poké



Pure Seed

  • Effects: Warps user to the room with the stairs. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 350 Poké



Reviver Seed

  • Effects: Automatically revives the user and fully heals HP, PP, statuses, and the Hunger counter when HP hits zero. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons if simply eaten and not automatically used.
  • Shop Cost: 800 Poké; 2 Gold Bars



Sleep Seed

  • Effects: Causes the eater to fall asleep, if such is possible. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 60 Poké



Stun Seed

  • Effects: The Pokémon affected will not move until attacked, or after a long time period. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Totter Seed

  • Effects: Confuses the eater. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Training Seed

  • Effects: Speeds up the leveling up of moves. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Vile Seed

  • Effects: Lowers the eater's Defense and Special Defense as much as possible. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 500 Poké



Violent Seed

  • Effects: Raises the eater's Attack and Special Attack as much as possible. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Warp Seed

  • Effects: Warps the eater elsewhere, at random, on the floor. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké




Other Food Items

Apple

  • Effects: Heals Hunger counter by 50 in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Big Apple

  • Effects: Heals Hunger counter by all 100 points in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Big Donut

  • Effects: User gains 5,000 EXP.; heals Hunger count some in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Donut

  • Effects: User gains 1,500 EXP.; heals Hunger count some in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 600 Poké



Grimer Food

  • Effects: Heals Hunger count by up to 30 points in applicable dungeons, but user also gains a random status ailment.
  • Shop Cost: 30 Poké



Max Elixir

  • Effects: Heals all of a Pokemon's PP.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Mini-Donut

  • Effects: User gains 500 EXP.; heals Hunger count some in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 30 Poké




Glasses, Ribbons, Etc.

Bright Specs

  • Effects: You can see traps on the floor if you wear this.
  • Shop Cost: 5,000 Poké



Carefree Bandana

  • Effects: Raises evasion when the weather is sunny.
  • Shop Cost: 3,500 Poké



Charm Band

  • Effects: Stops sneak attacks.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké



Choice Ribbon

  • Effects: The consecutive use of the same move will increase its critical-hit rate.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Coalition Scarf

  • Effects: More readily allows team attacks.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Cover Band

  • Effects: The holder takes an ally's damage if the ally covered has under 33% HP.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Defense Scarf

  • Effects: Raises the holder's Defense, lowering damage received from physical moves.
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké



Detect Band

  • Effects: Raises the holder's evasion, make enemies more likely to miss with attacks.
  • Shop Cost: 4,000 Poké



Fickle Ribbon

  • Effects: Raises your critical-hit rate if you don't use the same move consecutively.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Focus Lens

  • Effects: The holder's critical-hit ratio increases.
  • Shop Cost: 2,000 Poké



Friend Bow

  • Effects: Makes Pokémon in dungeons easier to recruit in general.
  • Shop Cost: 6,000 Poké



Gold Scope

  • Effects: If the holder is the leader, you'll see Gold Bars in the floor and can grab them!
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Gold Ribbon

  • Effects: Its only purpose is to be sold for a fair amount of Poké.
  • Shop Cost: 5,000 Poké (although you should never buy it)



Heal Ribbon

  • Effects: Makes HP heal faster when walking around in a dungeon.
  • Shop Cost: 3,500 Poké



Insomniscope

  • Effects: The holder cannot gain the Yawning, Sleep, Napping, or Nightmare statuses by any means (even moves like Rest).
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Joy Ribbon

  • Effects: Gain EXP. as time goes on while walking: 1 EXP. every few steps.
  • Shop Cost: 5,555 Poké



Mobile Scarf

  • Effects: Allows the holder to walk anywhere - through walls, over lava, whatever.
  • Shop Cost: 7,777 Poké



Pass Scarf

  • Effects: The effects of a move against the holder is passed to a nearby enemy, but this causes a loss in HP with each use. If HP is too low, the effect of this item is nullified and the holder takes the brunt of the move.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Pecha Scarf

  • Effects: Prevents the holder from becoming Poisoned.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Persim Band

  • Effects: Prevents the holder from becoming Confused.
  • Shop Cost: 1,800 Poké



Pierce Band

  • Effects: Items the holder throws go through whatever they hit and don't stop.
  • Shop Cost: 7,500 Poké



Power Band

  • Effects: Raises the holder's Attack, making physical attacks more damaging.
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké



Protect Headband

  • Effects: Prevents "friendly fire" damage (attacks from allies to you).
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Reunion Cape

  • Effects: You warp to your allies when separated from them if you hold this.
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké



Special Band

  • Effects: Raises the holder's Special Attack, making special moves more damaging.
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké



Sticky Hood

  • Effects: Stops the holder from being hurt by thrown items.
  • Shop Cost: 3,500 Poké



Trap Scarf

  • Effects: Traps will not activate when the holder steps on them.
  • Shop Cost: 8,000 Poké



Treatment Scarf

  • Effects: Attack is boosted to increase physical damage, but HP is lowered.
  • Shop Cost: 2,200 Poké



Twist Band

  • Effects: Special Attack and Special Defense cannot be lowered by any moves or other means.
  • Shop Cost: 4,500 Poké



Warp Scarf

  • Effects: At random, the user will warp to another place on the dungeon floor.
  • Shop Cost: 1,200 Poké



Water Scope

  • Effects: The holder can walk on water. Pointless if the holder is a Flying- or Water-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



X-Ray Specs

  • Effects: The holder can see the locations of enemy Pokémon and items on the ground.
  • Shop Cost: 6,000 Poké



Zinc Band

  • Effects: Raises the holder's Special Defense, lowering damage from special attacks.
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké




Devices

Bug Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Bug-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Dark Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Dark-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Dragon Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Dragon-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Electric Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is an Electric-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Fighting Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Fighting-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Fire Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Fire-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Flying Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Flying-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Ghost Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Ghost-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Grass Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Grass-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Ground Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Ground-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Ice Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is an Ice-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Normal Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Normal-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Poison Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Poison-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Psychic Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Psychic-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Rock Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Rock-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Steel Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Steel-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké



Water Device

  • Effects: Boosts all stats on the holder if the holder is a Water-type.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké




Flags

Cheering Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, the amount of damage you deal via moves increases. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 30 Gold Bars



Clarity Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, you cannot become confused. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 25 Gold Bars



Immunity Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, you will not become Poisoned or Badly Poisoned. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 30 Gold Bars



Insomnia Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, you will not enter a Yawning, Sleep, Napping, or Nightmare status. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 20 Gold Bars



Limber Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, you will not become paralyzed. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 20 Gold Bars



Resilient Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, your stats will not be lowered. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 35 Gold Bars



Tough Flag

  • Effects: When next to an ally holding this, you may not be KO'ed when you otherwise would be. Has no effect on the holder, however.
  • Shop Cost: 3,000 Poké; 15 Gold Bars




Orbs

Ability Erase Orb

  • Effects: Enemy Pokémon abilities are disabled across the dungeon floor.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



All-Invincible Orb

  • Effects: The user and his allies will not be damaged for several turns.
  • Shop Cost: 600 Poké



All Power Orb

  • Effects: Boosts the team's Attack and Defense, boosting physical damage dealt and lowering that received.
  • Shop Cost: 250 Poké



All Power-Up Orb

  • Effects: Boosts the team's Attack and Special Attack sharply, increasing the damage dealt from most attacks.
  • Shop Cost: 250 Poké



All Dodge Orb

  • Effects: Raises the team's evasion, making them as a whole more likely to not be hit.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Blowback Orb

  • Effects: Sends enemies in the room flying, causing damage if they hit walls or other Pokémon.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Cleanse Orb

  • Effects: Cleans up items that were made sticky, by a trap or other means, allowing their use.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Custody Orb

  • Effects: Move the items in your pack to your box.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Decoy Orb

  • Effects: Enemies will focus their attacks on the user and pretty much ignore his teammates.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Escape Orb

  • Effects: Instantly flee a dungeon without loss of items or money.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Evasion Orb

  • Effects: Raises the evasion of the user, making enemies less likely to hit the user.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Evolution Orb

  • Effects: Causes all enemies on the floor to evolve.
  • Shop Cost: 2,000 Poké



Foe-Fear Orb

  • Effects: Temporarily induces a Terrified status on all enemies on the floor, making them flee from you.
  • Shop Cost: 400 Poké



Foe-Hold Orb

  • Effects: Petrifies all enemies on the floor, making them not move for a long time or until attacked.
  • Shop Cost: 400 Poké



Foe-Seal Orb

  • Effects: Temporarily prevents enemy movement.
  • Shop Cost: 350 Poké



Hail Orb

  • Effects: Causes Hailing weather, damaging all but Ice-types.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Health Orb

  • Effects: Cures all status ailments on the user and temporarily prevents them as well.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



House Orb

  • Effects: Instantly makes a Monster House.
  • Shop Cost: 500 Poké



Luminous Orb

  • Effects: Reveals the whole map to you, barring items, enemies, traps, etc., that you've yet to find.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Mobile Orb

  • Effects: The user can go through walls, obstacles, etc., allowing the user to walk most anywhere.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



One-Shot Orb

  • Effects: May defeat the opponent, but not always.
  • Shop Cost: 800 Poké



Petrify Orb

  • Effects: Petrifies all enemies in the room, preventing their movement for a long time or until attacked.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Pierce Orb

  • Effects: Moves will go through obstacles, such as walls, as permitted by the move.
  • Shop Cost: 500 Poké



Pounce Orb

  • Effects: The user will go directly forward in one bound until stopped by something, like a wall.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Quick Orb

  • Effects: Allows the user to move one more time per turn. Maximum movements is four. Wears off eventually.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Radar Orb

  • Effects: Shows the locations of all enemy Pokémon on the floor.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Rainy Orb

  • Effects: Causes Rainy weather.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Raise Orb

  • Effects: Makes the user's HP as high as the ally's with the highest HP.
  • Shop Cost: 300 Poké



Rewind Orb

  • Effects: Makes all enemies in the room go back one evolutionary stage (i.e. Pikachu to Pichu).
  • Shop Cost: 1,000 Poké



Rollcall Orb

  • Effects: Makes all team members return to the leader's location instantly.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Sandy Orb

  • Effects: Causes a sandstorm, damaging all but Ground-, Rock-, and Steel-types.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Scanner Orb

  • Effects: Shows all items that on the ground on the dungeon floor.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



See-Trap Orb

  • Effects: Reveals all traps.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Slow Orb

  • Effects: Halves a Pokémon's movement speed.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Slumber Orb

  • Effects: Causes the Sleep status on all enemies in the room, if such is possible.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Spurn Orb

  • Effects: All enemies in the room will be warped elsewhere, at random, on the floor.
  • Shop Cost: 200 Poké



Stairs Orb

  • Effects: Reveals the location of the stairs to the next floor.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Stayaway Orb

  • Effects: Petrifies the target enemy (preventing movement for a long time or until they're attacked), then warps them near the stairs.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Sunny Orb

  • Effects: Causes the weather to be Sunny.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Surround Orb

  • Effects: You will point out a target in your line of sight, which your allies will fly to and surround immediately.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Switcher Orb

  • Effects: The user will switch positions with the target.
  • Shop Cost: 50 Poké



Totter Orb

  • Effects: Confuses all enemies in the room.
  • Shop Cost: 150 Poké



Trapbust Orb

  • Effects: Destroys all traps, if any, in the room.
  • Shop Cost: 120 Poké



Trawl Orb

  • Effects: Draws all items laying on the ground (except those in Kecleon shops) to the user.
  • Shop Cost: 300 Poké



Two-Edge Orb

  • Effects: Reduces all enemies' HP to 1, but halves the user's HP for each enemy affected.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké



Warp Orb

  • Effects: Warps the enemy randomly to a different room.
  • Shop Cost: 100 Poké




Throwable Weaponry

Geo Pebble

  • Effects: Thrown to damage the opponent. You can select the target directly.
  • Shop Cost: 20 Poké



Gravelerock

  • Effects: Thrown to damage the opponent. You can select the target directly.
  • Shop Cost: 15 Poké



Iron Thorn

  • Effects: Thrown to damage the opponent. Target must be within a line of sight.
  • Shop Cost: 4 Poké



Silver Spike

  • Effects: Thrown to damage the opponent. Target must be within a line of sight.
  • Shop Cost: 6 Poké



Stick

  • Effects: Thrown to damage the opponent. Target must be within a line of sight.
  • Shop Cost: 2 Poké




Vitamins

Calcium

  • Effects: Boosts Special Attack permanently, allowing for higher damage via special moves. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Iron

  • Effects: Boosts Defense permanently, lowering damage from physical attacks. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



PP Max

  • Effects: Raises a move's maximum PP by ~60%. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Protein

  • Effects: Increases Attack permanently, allowing for higher damage dealt via physical moves. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké



Zinc

  • Effects: Increases Special Defense permanently, lowering damage from special moves. Also heals 5 points on the Hunger Counter in applicable dungeons.
  • Shop Cost: 1,500 Poké




Evolution Items

Dusk Stone





Fire Stone





Frozen Rock





Leaf Stone





Link Cable





Lunar Ribbon





Moon Stone





Mossy Rock





Shiny Stone





Sun Ribbon





Sun Stone





Thunderstone





Water Stone





TMs/HMs

I'll just copy and paste the data from my Pokémon Black/White Versions 2 Pokédex. There will be a few discrepancies in this list. Firstly, TM's aren't actually numbered in-game, but they are in the main games. Also, Power and Accuracy are not given strict numerical definitions, but mathematical examination seems to show these stats remain the same. This listing also assumes absolute base-level, not-leveled-up-at-all stats for the moves. Finally, whether that Max PP stat is accurate is hard to say, because some moves don't conform to this standard.

[TM/HM] [Move Name] [Type] [Power][Accuracy][Max PP][Class]
TM01 Hone Claws Dark --- --- 15 Status
TM02 Dragon Claw Dragon 80 100 15 Physical
TM03 Psyshock Psychic 80 100 10 Special
TM04 Calm Mind Psychic --- --- 20 Status
TM05 Roar Normal --- 100 20 Status
TM06 Toxic Poison --- 90 10 Status
TM07 Hail Ice --- --- 10 Status
TM08 Bulk Up Fighting --- --- 20 Status
TM09 Venoshock Poison 65 100 10 Special
TM10 Hidden Power Normal --- 100 15 Special
TM11 Sunny Day Fire --- --- 5 Status
TM12 Taunt Dark --- 100 20 Status
TM13 Ice Beam Ice 95 100 10 Special
TM14 Blizzard Ice 120 70 5 Special
TM15 Hyper Beam Normal 150 90 5 Special
TM16 Light Screen Psychic --- --- 30 Status
TM17 Protect Normal --- --- 10 Status
TM18 Rain Dance Water --- --- 5 Status
TM19 Telekinesis Psychic --- --- 15 Status
TM20 Safeguard Normal --- --- 25 Status
TM21 Frustration Normal --- 100 20 Physical
TM22 SolarBeam Grass 120 100 10 Special
TM23 Smack Down Rock 50 100 15 Physical
TM24 Thunderbolt Electric 95 100 15 Special
TM25 Thunder Electric 120 70 10 Special
TM26 Earthquake Ground 100 100 10 Physical
TM27 Return Normal --- 100 20 Physical
TM28 Dig Ground 80 100 10 Physical
TM29 Psychic Psychic 90 100 10 Special
TM30 Shadow Ball Ghost 80 100 15 Special
TM31 Brick Break Fighting 75 100 15 Physical
TM32 Double Team Normal --- --- 15 Status
TM33 Reflect Psychic --- --- 20 Status
TM34 Sludge Wave Poison 95 100 10 Special
TM35 Flamethrower Fire 95 100 15 Special
TM36 Sludge Bomb Poison 90 100 10 Special
TM37 Sandstorm Rock --- --- 10 Status
TM38 Fire Blast Fire 120 85 5 Special
TM39 Rock Tomb Rock 50 80 10 Physical
TM40 Aerial Ace Flying 60 --- 20 Physical
TM41 Torment Dark --- 100 15 Status
TM42 Facade Normal 70 100 10 Physical
TM43 Flame Charge Fire 50 100 20 Physical
TM44 Rest Psychic --- --- 10 Status
TM45 Attract Normal --- 100 15 Status
TM46 Thief Dark 40 100 10 Physical
TM47 Low Sweep Fighting 60 100 20 Physical
TM48 Round Normal 60 100 15 Special
TM49 Echoed Voice Normal 40 100 15 Special
TM50 Overheat Fire 140 90 5 Special
TM51 Ally Switch Psychic --- --- 15 Status
TM52 Focus Blast Fighting 120 70 5 Special
TM53 Energy Ball Grass 80 100 10 Special
TM54 False Swipe Normal 40 100 40 Physical
TM55 Scald Water 80 100 15 Special
TM56 Fling Dark --- 100 10 Physical
TM57 Charge Beam Electric 50 90 10 Special
TM58 Sky Drop Flying 60 100 10 Physical
TM59 Incinerate Fire 30 100 15 Special
TM60 Quash Dark --- 100 15 Status
TM61 Will-O-Wisp Fire --- 75 15 Status
TM62 Acrobatics Flying 55 100 15 Physical
TM63 Embargo Dark --- 100 15 Status
TM64 Explosion Normal 250 100 5 Physical
TM65 Shadow Claw Ghost 70 100 15 Physical
TM66 Payback Dark 50 100 10 Physical
TM67 Retaliate Normal 70 100 5 Physical
TM68 Giga Impact Normal 150 90 5 Physical
TM69 Rock Polish Rock --- --- 20 Status
TM70 Flash Normal --- 100 20 Status
TM71 Stone Edge Rock 100 80 5 Physical
TM72 Volt Switch Electric 70 100 20 Special
TM73 Thunder Wave Electric --- 100 20 Status
TM74 Gyro Ball Steel --- 100 5 Physical
TM75 Swords Dance Normal --- --- 30 Status
TM76 Struggle Bug Bug 30 100 20 Special
TM77 Psych Up Normal --- --- 10 Status
TM78 Bulldoze Ground 60 100 20 Physical
TM79 Frost Breath Ice 40 90 10 Special
TM80 Rock Slide Rock 75 90 10 Physical
TM81 X-Scissor Bug 80 100 15 Physical
TM82 Dragon Tail Dragon 60 90 10 Physical
TM83 Work Up Normal --- --- 30 Status
TM84 Poison Jab Poison 80 100 20 Physical
TM85 Dream Eater Psychic 100 100 20 Special
TM86 Grass Knot Grass --- 100 20 Special
TM87 Swagger Normal --- 90 15 Status
TM88 Pluck Flying 60 100 20 Physical
TM89 U-turn Bug 70 100 20 Physical
TM90 Substitute Normal --- --- 10 Status
TM91 Flash Cannon Steel 80 100 10 Special
TM92 Trick Room Psychic --- --- 5 Status
TM93 Wild Charge Electric 90 100 15 Physical
TM94 Rock Smash Fighting 40 100 15 Physical
TM95 Snarl Dark 55 95 15 Special
HM01 Cut Normal 50 95 15 Physical
HM02 Fly Flying 90 95 15 Physical
HM03 Surf Water 95 100 15 Special
HM04 Strength Normal 80 100 15 Physical
HM05 Waterfall Water 80 100 15 Physical
HM06 Dive Water 80 100 10 Physical


Pokémon Gifts

Archen Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Archen you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Tough Flag
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Audino Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Audino you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Azurill Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Azurill you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two of any Seed
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Bagon Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Bagon you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Blitzle Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Blitzle you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Bug Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Bug-type you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,920 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon



Cottonee Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Cottonee you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Quick Seeds
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Cranidos Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Cranidos you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Croagunk Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Croagunk you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Pecha Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Cryogonal Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Cryogonal you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Cubchoo Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Cubchoo you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Rawst Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Dark Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Dark-type you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,920 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Deino Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Deino you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Rich Soil
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Dragon Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Dragon-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,600 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Drilbur Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Drilbur you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Clarity Flag
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Druddigon Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Druddigon you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Violent Seed
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Ducklett Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Ducklett you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Dunsparce Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Dunsparce you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Warp Seeds
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Dwebble Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Dwebble you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Def. Scarf/Defense Scarf
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Eevee Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Eevee you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,000 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Electric Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Electric-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,280 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Emolga Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Emolga you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,000 Poké, two Cheri Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Fighting Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Fighting-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 800 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Fire Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Fire-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,120 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Flying Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Flying-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 640 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon



Foongus Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Foongus you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Twist Headband
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Ghost Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Ghost-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 800 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Glameow Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Glameow you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Cheri Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Golett Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Golett you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Hard Stone Shard
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Gothita Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Gothita you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Special Band
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Grass Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Grass-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 2,240 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Ground Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Ground-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,280 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Ice Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Ice-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,120 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Joltik Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Joltik you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Cheri Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Klink Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Klink you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Sticky Hood
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Larvesta Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Larvesta you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Rawst Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Lillipup Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Lillipup you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Chesto Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Litwick Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Litwick you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, X-Ray Specs
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Mienfoo Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Mienfoo you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Minccino Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Minccino you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Lucky Ribbon
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Munna Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Munna you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Clarity Flag
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Normal Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Normal-type you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 2,720 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Panpour Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Panpour you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Pansage Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Pansage you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Pansear Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Pansear you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Patrat Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Patrat you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Chesto Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Pawniard Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Pawniard you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Petilil Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Petilil you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Poison Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Poison-type you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 640 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon



Premier Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Pokémon you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 3,500 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:



Psychic Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Psychic-type you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,600 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Rock Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Rock-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 1,280 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Roggenrola Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Roggenrola you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Rufflet Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Rufflet you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Effort Flag
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Sandile Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Sandile you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Carefree Bandana
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Scraggy Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Scraggy you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Training Seeds
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Sewaddle Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Sewaddle you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Steel Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Steel-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 640 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon
    • Use one of the Passwords



Swinub Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Swinub you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Tough Flag
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Timburr Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Timburr you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Ivy Paint
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Tirtouga Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Tirtouga you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Trubbish Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Trubbish you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Pecha Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Tympole Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Tympole you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Rainy Orb
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Venipede Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Venipede you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Pecha Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Vullaby Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Vullaby you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, Eyedrop Seed
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Water Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any unevolved Water-types you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 3,520 Poké
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon
    • The end of Cape at the Edge dungeon



Wingull Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Wingull you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Woobat Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Woobat you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Wooper Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Wooper you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Oran Berries
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Yamask Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Yamask you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké, two Totter Seeds
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon



Zorua Gift


  • Item Description: Automatically recruits any Zorua you beat in a dungeon.
  • Gift Shop Costs: 300 Poké and some kind of Orb - I can't tell which
  • Alternate Locations:
    • Cincinno's Gift Store
    • The [[Kecleon's Bazaar]] downloadable dungeon




Miscellaneous Items

Accuracy Manual

  • Effects: Increases the accuracy of a move in a Dojo.
  • Shop Cost: 2,400 Poké
  • Locations: Trade for 3 Gold Bars at Cofagrigus's shop; get at a Dojo



Black Key

  • Effects: Unlocks a dungeon door.
  • Shop Cost: 1,650 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; Cofagrigus's shop (5 Gold Bars)



Blue Key

  • Effects: Unlocks a dungeon door.
  • Shop Cost: 1,650 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; use one of the Passwords; Cofagrigus's shop (5 Gold Bars)



Gold Bar

  • Effects: Trade it to Cofagrigus when his shop is open in Post Town for a lot of money or rare items!
  • Shop Cost: Cannot be bought
  • Locations: Random dungeon find, mostly on sparkling tiles



Gold Ticket

  • Effects: Allows you to play in the lottery.
  • Shop Cost: 5,000 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; Cofagrigus's shop (3 Gold Bars)



Green Key

  • Effects: Unlocks a dungeon door.
  • Shop Cost: 1,650 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; use one of the Passwords; Cofagrigus's shop (5 Gold Bars)



Heart Pendant

  • Effects: Boosts maximum HP of Pokémon.
  • Shop Cost: 8,000 Poké
  • Locations: Kecleon's shops, random mission prize, random dungeon item



Lottery Ticket

  • Effects: Used to play the lottery.
  • Shop Cost: 800 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; use one of the Passwords; Cofagrigus's shop (1 Gold Bar)



Poké

  • Effects: Poké is the unit of money in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games.
  • Shop Cost: N/A
  • Locations: Dungeons, missions, selling items, etc.



Power Manual

  • Effects: Increases the power of moves in a Dojo.
  • Shop Cost: 2,400 Poké
  • Locations: Use one of the Passwords; trade for 3 Gold Bars at Cofagrigus's shop; get at a Dojo



PP Manual

  • Effects: Increases the PP of moves in a Dojo.
  • Shop Cost: 2,400 Poké
  • Locations: Use one of the Passwords; trade for 3 Gold Bars at Cofagrigus's shop; get at a Dojo



Proof of Courage

  • Effects: Boosts the Attack of the Pokémon greatly.
  • Shop Cost: 8,000 Poké
  • Locations: 99F of the [[Ultimate Dungeon]] downloadable dungeon



Proof of Fortitude

  • Effects: Boosts the highest stat the Pokémon has.
  • Shop Cost: 8,000 Poké
  • Locations: 60F of the [[Strongest Trail]] downloadable dungeon



Red Key

  • Effects: Opens a dungeon door.
  • Shop Cost: 1,650 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; use one of the Passwords; Cofagrigus's shop (5 Gold Bars)



Silver Ticket

  • Effects: Used to play the lottery.
  • Shop Cost: 2,500 Poké
  • Locations: Random mission prize; use one of the Passwords; Cofagrigus's shop (2 Gold Bars)






Pokémon Paradise Stores

Introduction

Perhaps the most important feature of the Pokémon Paradise is the customizable areas. Once you defeat Gurdurr in a dungeon, you will be able to fashion areas to have specific functions. There exist four types of land, with each having four potential stores. You can only expand from near your initial house, but that will slowly expand later on. The Pokémon Paradise is itself a 3x3 grid, with all but the bottom-center square being able to be developed. Each of the areas can be filled with up to four facilities - at that point, they can be upgraded, the main purpose of this section. It doesn't have to be just stores, though - you can designate areas for Type Dojos and growing Seeds or Berries, for example!

First, you must prepare the land in the area. This will require materials and money. You'll find specifics in the Types of Land section. Speak to Gurdurr in the Paradise Center for this.

Then you need to build the facility. This also requires materials and money. That's the rest of this section. To do this, go to the prepared land, examine a sign, and it's obvious from there.

After that, you can simply upgrade from there or move on. The materials are gained by completing missions. You can get more areas to be filled in the Paradise by filling prepared areas with facilities.

As you fill up more of the areas, you can recruit more and more Pokémon, too. The below table details that - as a point of reference, take note that there are ~144 recruitable species of Pokémon in this game.

Areas Owned Maximum Pokémon Percent of Total Species
1 area 64 Pokémon 44.4%
2 areas 80 Pokémon 55.6%
3 areas 96 Pokémon 66.7%
4 areas 120 Pokémon 83.3%
5 areas 144 Pokémon 100%
6 areas 176 Pokémon 122.2%
7 areas 208 Pokémon 144.4%
8 areas 248 Pokémon 172.2%
9 areas (max) 288 Pokémon 200%


Types of Land

Availability

This option initially will start with the Pleasant Plain option, then, as you open more areas, you will get more options for preparing land. To open areas, you must fill previous areas with three or more facilities.




Cool Creekside


  • Unlocked: Fill one area with three or more facilities.

  • Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • One Rich Soil
    • Three Spring Waters



Fertile Forest


  • Unlocked: Fill two areas, both with three or more facilities.

  • Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • One Rich Soil
    • Two Precious Branches
    • Two Sturdy Vines



Pleasant Plain


  • Unlocked: The first land you'll ever prepare.

  • Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • One Rich Soil
    • One Fresh Herb



Rough Rockery


  • Unlocked: Fill three areas, all with three or more facilities.

  • Cost:
    • 1,500 Poké
    • One Rich Soil
    • Two Lustrous Metals
    • Three Stone Slabs




Facility Painting

Availability

This option will become available after put three or more facilities in two areas of the Paradise, opening up the third bit of land you can expand onto.




Normal


  • Cost:
    • 45 Poké
    • One Soil Pigment
    • One Wood Pigmnet
    • One Strong Pigment



Red


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Soil Pigments



Blue


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Vine Pigments



Yellow


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Wood Pigments



Purple


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Metal Pigments



Green


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Grass Pigments



Pink


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Stone Pigments



Light Blue


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Water Pigments



Black


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • One Soil Pigment
    • One Wood Pigment
    • One Grass Pigment




Field Painting

Availability

This option will become available after put three or more facilities in two areas of the Paradise, opening up the third bit of land you can expand onto.




Red


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Soil Pigments



Blue


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Vine Pigments



Yellow


  • Cost:
    • 100 Poké
    • Two Wood Pigments




General Stores

Berries and Seeds



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Precious Branches

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Heavy Lumbers

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Three Fine Logs



Elite Boutique


  • Function: Sells various items, often at low prices, but they can also be very high!
  • Requirements: Platinum Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • One Sturdy Vine
    • One Fresh Herb

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • One Hardy Vine
    • One Leaf Bouquet

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • One Everlasting Vine
    • One Grass Veil



Oodles of Orbs


  • Function: Sells Orbs and other miscellaneous items.
  • Requirements: Gold Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 900 Poké
    • Two Sturdy Vines
    • Two Fresh Herbs

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Hardy Vines
    • Three Leaf Bouquets

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Everlasting Vines
    • Four Grass Veils



Swap Shop


  • Function: Offers up trades for items, like the PMD2: Explorers of Sky recycle shop run by Wynaut.
  • Requirements: Gold Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Precious Branches
    • Two Lustrous Metals
    • Two Sturdy Vines
    • Two Fresh Herbs

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Heavy Lumbers
    • Three Glimmering Alloys
    • Three Unbreakable Rocks
    • Three Hardy Vines
    • Three Leaf Bouquets

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Fine Logs
    • Four Gilded Metals
    • Four Endless Stones
    • Four Everlasting Vines
    • Four Grass Veils




Seed/Berry Fields

Blast Field


  • Function: To grow Blast Seeds.
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Blast Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Blast Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Five Rare Soils
    • Five Rainbow Drops
    • Five Blast Seeds



Blinker Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Blinker Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Blinker Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Blinker Seeds



Encourage Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Two Encourage Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Four Ancient Soils
    • Four Well Waters
    • Three Encourage Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Five Rare Soils
    • Five Rainbow Drops
    • Four Encourage Seeds



Eyedrop Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Eyedrop Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Eyedrop Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Eyedrop Seeds



Heal Field


  • Function: To grow Heal Seeds.
  • Requirements: Platinum Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Two Heal Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Four Ancient Soils
    • Four Well Waters
    • Three Heal Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Five Rare Soils
    • Five Rainbow Drops
    • Four Heal Seeds



Oran Field


  • Function: To grow Oran Berry items.
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • One Oran Berry

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Two Oran Berries

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Three Oran Berries



Pure Field


  • Function: To grow Pure Seeds.
  • Requirements: Master Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Pure Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Pure Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Six Rare Soils
    • Six Rainbow Drops
    • Six Pure Seeds



Quick Field


  • Function: To grow Quick Seeds.
  • Requirements: Silver Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Quick Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Quick Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Quick Seeds



Revive Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Two Reviver Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Four Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Reviver Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Six Rare Soils
    • Six Rainbow Drops
    • Six Reviver Seeds



Sleep Field


  • Function: To grow Sleep Seeds.
  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Sleep Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Sleep Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Sleep Seeds



Stun Field


  • Function: To grow Stun Seeds.
  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Stun Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Stun Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Stun Seeds



Totter Field


  • Function: To grow Totter Seeds.
  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Totter Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Totter Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Totter Seeds



Training Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Two Training Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Four Ancient Soils
    • Four Well Waters
    • Three Training Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Five Rare Soils
    • Five Rainbow Drops
    • Four Training Seeds



Vile Field


  • Function: To grow Vile Seeds.
  • Requirements: Diamond Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Vile Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Vile Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Five Rare Soils
    • Five Rainbow Drops
    • Five Vile Seeds



Violent Field



  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Two Violent Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Violent Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Violent Seeds



Warp Field


  • Function: To grow Warp Seeds.
  • Requirements: Silver Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Spring Waters
    • Two Warp Seeds

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Well Waters
    • Three Warp Seeds

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Rainbow Drops
    • Four Warp Seeds




Type Dojos

Bug Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Bug type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Dark Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Dark type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Dragon Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Dragon type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Electric Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Electric type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Fighting Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Fighting type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Fire Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Fire type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Flying Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Flying type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Ghost Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Ghost type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Grass Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Grass type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Ground Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Ground type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Ice Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Ice type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Normal Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Normal type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Poison Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Poison type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Psychic Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Psychic type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Rock Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Rock type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Steel Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Steel type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones



Water Dojo


  • Function: To train moves of the Water type, making them level up faster!
  • Requirements: Normal Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Stone Slabs
    • Two Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Five Reflective Alloys
    • Five Unbreakable Rocks

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Seven Gilded Metals
    • Seven Endless Stones




Miscellaneous Areas

Beartic Slide

  • Function: Gives you a minigame to play for items, such as Evolution Items, which are exclusive to this.
  • Requirements: Gold Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 3,000 Poké
    • Three Rich Soils
    • Three Stone Slabs
    • Three Lustrous Metals

  • Upgrade #1 Cost: N/A

  • Upgrade #2 Cost: N/A



Detour Guide


  • Function: To tell you of special dungeon locations.
  • Requirements: Silver Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Rich Soils
    • Two Precious Branches

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Ancient Soils
    • Three Heavy Lumbers

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Rare Soils
    • Four Fine Logs



Musical Paradise

  • Function: Speak with Meloetta here to recruit her. Also allows playing of known background music.
  • Requirements: Beat the game once

  • Start Cost:
    • 4,500 Poké
    • Three Gilded Metals
    • Three Fine Logs
    • Three Endless Stones
    • Three Rare Soils

  • Upgrade #1 Cost: N/A

  • Upgrade #2 Cost: N/A



Prize Palace


  • Function: Allows playing of the lottery for potential prizes.
  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Two Lustrous Metals
    • Two Sturdy Vines

  • Upgrade #1 Cost:
    • 600 Poké
    • Three Reflective Alloys
    • Three Hardy Vines

  • Upgrade #2 Cost:
    • 1,000 Poké
    • Four Gilded Metals
    • Four Everlasting Vines



Sunken Treasure

  • Function: Gives you a minigame to play for items, such as Evolution Items, which are exclusive to this.
  • Requirements: Bronze Rank

  • Start Cost:
    • 300 Poké
    • Three Spring Waters
    • Three Fresh Herbs
    • Three Precious Branches

  • Upgrade #1 Cost: N/A

  • Upgrade #2 Cost: N/A






Pokémon Details

Section Format (READ!)

  • National Dex Number: What number this Pokémon has in the National Dex of the fifth generation games.
  • Pokémon Type: What is its type?
  • Potential Locations:
    • One place you can find it...
    • Another...
    • And so on. As possible, the locations are internally linked within this FAQ, so you can go there for further, more in-depth info such as floor-by-floor data. The dungeons themselves are based on approximate order of unlocking - the first will be the first accessible, second is second, and so on, leaving the various post-credits and DLC Dungeons for last. The Magnagate Dungeons are excluded because you can't recruit from them anyways.

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
This will detail how to get the Pokémon's various evolutions and whether such exist or not.

Note on Evolutions

The evolutions were derived from my Pokédex for Pokémon Black/White Versions 2, which were in turn derived from that same game, and combined with the various mechanics of PMD3: Gates to Infinity. There are some mechanics I'm not entirely sure of (for example, how Pichu evolves into Pikachu, because it was Happiness in the mainstream games and the seemingly-now-absent IQ in previous Mystery Dungeons), so just take anything mentioning the Happy Ribbon with a grain of salt, as I'm not 100% sure if that's the correct item translation or its intended effect.


BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP Maximum HP
Attack Attack
Defense Defense
Special Attack Special Attack
Special Defense Special Defense

Stats Chart

The above chart will detail the Pokémon's base stats upon which all stat calculations are made, and the lowest possible stats this Pokémon will have at Level 100. With regard to the former of the two, you will not find these stats at Level 1 - that's just because the formulas in the game require a shift down from the base stats due to the lower level. Nevertheless, these can still be used as good, general comparisons between Pokémon. Generally, 60 ~ 70 is the average for a Pokémon; higher is better, less is worse. You can also make more direct comparisons. For example, Zekrom has 150 base Attack, while Landorus has 125 base Attack. It can therefore be assumed that Zekrom is more powerful than Landorus when using physical attacks. Of course, other things, like the power of moves, comes into play with that, but you get the general idea.

A similar idea is in play with the Level 100 stats. Stat changes do differ a little from Pokémon to Pokémon as they level up and evolve, so you may need to remake comparisons. However, despite the evolution process, that won't affect post-evolution stat growth, as the stats are altered based upon the new base stats. The second half of the chart will represent the lowest possible stats a Pokémon will have at Level 100, which primarily takes a lack of stat-boosting items, like Proteins and Irons, into account.

For reference, the highest possible base stat would be 255 in theory, but that's only happened with Blissey, a Pokémon not in Gates to Infinity. This allowed a possible range of that stat (maximum HP) between 620 and 714 at Level 100, barring Nature-based variance. (Only in the mainstream games, don't worry.)



Amoonguss


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Foongus Level 39 Amoonguss N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 114 Maximum HP 338
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 85 Special Attack 175
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 65


Archen


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Archen Level 37 Archeops N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 112 Attack 229
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 74 Special Attack 153
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Archeops


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Archen Level 37 Archeops N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 140 Attack 285
Defense 65 Defense 135
Special Attack 112 Special Attack 229
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Audino


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Audino N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 103 Maximum HP 316
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 86 Defense 177
Special Attack 86 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 177


Axew


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Axew Level 38 Fraxure Level 48 Haxorus

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 46 Maximum HP 202
Attack 87 Attack 179
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 30 Special Attack 65
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Azumarill


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Azurill Happy Ribbon Marill Level 18 Azumarill

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 100 Maximum HP 310
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Azurill


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Azurill Happy Ribbon Marill Level 18 Azumarill

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 20 Attack 45
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 20 Special Attack 45
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Bagon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Bagon Level 30 Shelgon Level 50 Salamence

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 45
Attack 75 Attack 75
Defense 60 Defense 60
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 40
Special Defense 30 Special Defense 30


Beartic


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cubchoo Level 37 Beartic N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 110 Attack 225
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Bisharp


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pawniard Level 52 Bisharp N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 125 Attack 255
Defense 100 Defense 205
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Blitzle


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Blitzle Level 27 Zebstrika N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 32 Defense 69
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 32 Special Defense 69


Boldore


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Roggenrola Level 25 Boldore Link Cable Gigalith

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 310
Attack 105 Attack 215
Defense 105 Defense 215
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Bouffalant

  • National Dex Number: #626
  • Pokémon Type: Normal
  • Potential Locations:
    • Scalchop Beach
      • Oddly, this Pokémon was never mentioned as being a part of the 144 Pokémon to be released in this game, but it's here.

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Bouffalant N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 110 Attack 225
Defense 95 Defense 195
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Braviary


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Rufflet Level 54 Braviary N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 100 Maximum HP 310
Attack 123 Attack 251
Defense 75 Defense 155
Special Attack 87 Special Attack 119
Special Defense 75 Special Defense 155


Carracosta


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tirtouga Level 34 Carracosta N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 74 Maximum HP 258
Attack 108 Attack 221
Defense 133 Defense 271
Special Attack 83 Special Attack 171
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Chandelure


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Litwick Level 41 Lampent Dusk Stone Chandelure

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 145 Special Attack 295
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 185


Cinccino

  • National Dex Number: #573
  • Pokémon Type: Normal
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Minccino Shiny Stone Cinccino N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 95 Attack 195
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Cobalion

  • National Dex Number: #638
  • Pokémon Type: Steel/Fighting
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cobalion N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 91 Maximum HP 292
Attack 90 Attack 185
Defense 129 Defense 263
Special Attack 90 Special Attack 185
Special Defense 72 Special Defense 149


Cofagrigus


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Yamask Level 34 Cofagrigus N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 58 Maximum HP 226
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 145 Defense 295
Special Attack 95 Special Attack 195
Special Defense 105 Special Defense 215


Conkeldurr


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Timburr Level 25 Gurdurr Link Cable Conkeldurr

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 105 Maximum HP 320
Attack 140 Attack 285
Defense 95 Defense 195
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Cottonee


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cottonee Sun Stone Whimsicott N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 40 Maximum HP 190
Attack 27 Attack 59
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 37 Special Attack 79
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Cranidos


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cranidos Level 30 Rampardos N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 67 Maximum HP 244
Attack 125 Attack 255
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 30 Special Attack 65
Special Defense 30 Special Defense 65


Croagunk


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Croagunk Level 37 Toxicroak N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 48 Maximum HP 206
Attack 61 Attack 127
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 61 Special Attack 127
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Crustle


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Dwebble Level 34 Crustle N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 95 Attack 195
Defense 125 Defense 255
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 75 Special Defense 155


Cryogonal


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cryogonal N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 30 Defense 65
Special Attack 95 Special Attack 195
Special Defense 135 Special Defense 275


Cubchoo


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cubchoo Level 37 Beartic N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 70 Attack 145
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Deino


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Deino Level 50 Zweilous Level 64 Hydreigon

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 52 Maximum HP 214
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Dewott


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Oshawott Level 17 Dewott Level 36 Samurott

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 75 Attack 155
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 83 Special Attack 171
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Drilbur


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Drilbur Level 31 Excadrill N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 30 Special Attack 65
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Druddigon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Druddigon N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 77 Maximum HP 264
Attack 120 Attack 245
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 185


Ducklett

  • National Dex Number: #580
  • Pokémon Type: Water/Flying
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Ducklett Level 35 Swanna N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 62 Maximum HP 234
Attack 44 Attack 93
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 44 Special Attack 93
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Dunsparce


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Dunsparce N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 100 Maximum HP 310
Attack 70 Attack 145
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Dwebble


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Dwebble Level 34 Crustle N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 35 Special Defense 75


Eevee

  • National Dex Number: #133
  • Pokémon Type: Normal
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Emboar


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tepig Level 17 Pignite Level 36 Emboar

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 110 Maximum HP 330
Attack 123 Attack 251
Defense 65 Defense 135
Special Attack 100 Special Attack 205
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Emolga

  • National Dex Number: #587
  • Pokémon Type: Electric/Flying
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Emolga N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 75 Attack 155
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 75 Special Attack 155
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Espeon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 130 Special Attack 265
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Excadrill


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Drilbur Level 31 Excadrill N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 110 Maximum HP 330
Attack 135 Attack 275
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Flareon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 130 Attack 265
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 95 Special Attack 195
Special Defense 110 Special Defense 225


Foongus


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Foongus Level 39 Amoonguss N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 69 Maximum HP 248
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Fraxure


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Axew Level 38 Fraxure Level 48 Haxorus

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 66 Maximum HP 242
Attack 117 Attack 238
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Galvantula


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Joltik Level 36 Galvantula N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 77 Attack 159
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 97 Special Attack 199
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Garbodor


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Trubbish Level 36 Garbodor N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 80 Maximum HP 270
Attack 95 Attack 195
Defense 82 Defense 169
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 82 Special Defense 169


Gigalith


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Roggenrola Level 25 Boldore Link Cable Gigalith

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 85 Maximum HP 310
Attack 135 Attack 275
Defense 130 Defense 265
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Glaceon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 110 Defense 225
Special Attack 130 Special Attack 265
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Glameow


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Glameow Level 38 Purugly N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 49 Maximum HP 208
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 42 Defense 89
Special Attack 42 Special Attack 89
Special Defense 37 Special Defense 79


Golett


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Golett Level 43 Golurk N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 59 Maximum HP 228
Attack 74 Attack 153
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Golurk


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Golett Level 43 Golurk N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 89 Maximum HP 288
Attack 124 Attack 253
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Gothita


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Gothita Level 32 Gothorita Level 41 Gothitelle

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 30 Attack 65
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Gothitelle


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Gothita Level 32 Gothorita Level 41 Gothitelle

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 45 Attack 95
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 75 Special Attack 155
Special Defense 85 Special Defense 175


Gothorita


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Gothita Level 32 Gothorita Level 41 Gothitelle

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 45 Attack 95
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 75 Special Attack 155
Special Defense 85 Special Defense 175


Gurdurr


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Timburr Level 25 Gurdurr Link Cable Conkeldurr

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 85 Maximum HP 280
Attack 105 Attack 215
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Haxorus


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Axew Level 38 Fraxure Level 48 Haxorus

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 76 Maximum HP 262
Attack 147 Attack 299
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Herdier


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Lillipup Level 16 Herdier Level 32 Stoutland

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 80 Attack 165
Defense 65 Defense 135
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Ho-Oh

  • National Dex Number: #250 (notably as a Shiny Pokémon, sometimes)
  • Pokémon Type: Fire/Flying
  • Potential Locations:
    • Eternal Ruins; cannot be recruited

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Ho-Oh N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 106 Maximum HP 322
Attack 130 Attack 265
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 110 Special Attack 225
Special Defense 154 Special Defense 313


Hydreigon

  • National Dex Number: #635
  • Pokémon Type: Dark/Dragon
  • Potential Locations:
    • An automatic recruitment

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Deino Level 50 Zweilous Level 64 Hydreigon

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 92 Maximum HP 294
Attack 105 Attack 215
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 125 Special Attack 255
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 185


Jolteon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 90 Defense 125
Special Attack 110 Special Attack 225
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Joltik


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Joltik Level 36 Galvantula N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 47 Attack 99
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 57 Special Attack 119
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Keldeo

  • National Dex Number: #647
  • Pokémon Type: Water/Fighting
  • Potential Locations:
    • An automatic recruitment

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Keldeo N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 91 Maximum HP 292
Attack 72 Attack 149
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 129 Special Attack 263
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 221


Klang


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Klink Level 38 Klang Level 49 Klinklang

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 80 Attack 165
Defense 95 Defense 195
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 85 Special Defense 175


Klink


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Klink Level 38 Klang Level 49 Klinklang

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 40 Maximum HP 190
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Klinklang


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Klink Level 38 Klang Level 49 Klinklang

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 100 Attack 205
Defense 115 Defense 235
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 85 Special Defense 175


Krokorok


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sandile Level 29 Krokorok Level 40 Krookodile

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 82 Attack 169
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Krookodile


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sandile Level 29 Krokorok Level 40 Krookodile

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 117 Attack 239
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Kyurem

  • National Dex Number: #646 (comes in his Normal, Black, and White Formes)
  • Pokémon Type: Ice/Dragon
  • Potential Locations:
    • Hoarfrost Tower, Turbulent Tor, or Deserted Hoarfrost Tower; cannot be recruited

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Kyurem N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Normal Kyurem: Black Kyurem: White Kyurem: Normal Kyurem: Black Kyurem: White Kyurem:
Maximum HP 125 125 125 Maximum HP 360 360 360
Attack 130 170 120 Attack 265 345 245
Defense 90 100 90 Defense 185 205 185
Special Attack 130 120 170 Special Attack 265 245 345
Special Defense 90 90 100 Special Defense 185 185 205


Lampent


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Litwick Level 41 Lampent Dusk Stone Chandelure

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 40 Attack 85
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 95 Special Attack 195
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Landorus

  • National Dex Number: #645
  • Pokémon Type: Ground/Flying
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Landorus N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 89 Maximum HP 288
Attack 125 Attack 255
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 115 Special Attack 235
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Larvesta


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Larvesta Level 59 Volcarona N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Leafeon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Eevee Water Stone Vaporeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Thunderstone Jolteon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Fire Stone Flareon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Sun Ribbon Espeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Lunar Ribbon Umbreon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Mossy Rock Leafeon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.
Frozen Rock Glaceon N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 110 Attack 225
Defense 130 Defense 265
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Leavanny


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sewaddle Level 20 Swadloon Happy Ribbon Leavanny

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 103 Attack 211
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Lilligant


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Petilil Sun Stone Lilligant N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 75 Defense 155
Special Attack 110 Special Attack 225
Special Defense 75 Special Defense 155


Lillipup


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Lillipup Level 16 Herdier Level 32 Stoutland

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 25 Special Attack 55
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Litwick


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Litwick Level 41 Lampent Dusk Stone Chandelure

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 30 Attack 65
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Lugia

  • National Dex Number: #249
  • Pokémon Type: Psychic/Flying
  • Potential Locations:
    • Seasound Ruins; cannot be recruited

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Lugia N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 106 Maximum HP 322
Attack 90 Attack 185
Defense 130 Defense 265
Special Attack 90 Special Attack 185
Special Defense 154 Special Defense 313


Mamoswine


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Swinub Level 33 Piloswine Know AncientPower? Mamoswine

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 110 Maximum HP 330
Attack 130 Attack 265
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Mandibuzz


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Vullaby Level 54 Mandibuzz N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 110 Maximum HP 330
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 105 Defense 215
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Marill


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Azurill Happy Ribbon Marill Level 18 Azumarill

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 20 Attack 45
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 20 Special Attack 45
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Meloetta

  • National Dex Number: #648 (can be both her Aria and Pirouette Formes)
  • Pokémon Type:
    • Normal/Psychic (Aria Forme)
    • Normal/Fighting (Pirouette Forme)
  • Potential Locations:
    • An automatic recruitment when you speak to her after opening the Musical Paradise in the post-game

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Meloetta N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Aria Forme: Pirouette Forme: Aria Forme: Pirouette Forme:
Maximum HP 100 100 Maximum HP 310 310
Attack 77 128 Attack 159 261
Defense 77 90 Defense 159 261
Special Attack 128 77 Special Attack 261 159
Special Defense 128 128 Special Defense 261 159


Mienfoo


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Mienfoo Level 50 Mienshao N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Mienshao


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Mienfoo Level 50 Mienshao N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 125 Attack 255
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 95 Special Attack 195
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Minccino


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Minccino Shiny Stone Cinccino N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Munna

  • National Dex Number: #517
  • Pokémon Type: Psychic
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Munna Moon Stone Musharna N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 76 Maximum HP 262
Attack 25 Attack 55
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 67 Special Attack 138
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Musharna


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Munna Moon Stone Musharna N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 116 Maximum HP 342
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 107 Special Attack 219
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Oshawott


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Oshawott Level 17 Dewott Level 36 Samurott

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 63 Special Attack 131
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Palpitoad


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tympole Level 25 Palpitoad Level 36 Seismitoad

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 65 Attack 135
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Panpour


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Panpour Water Stone Simipour N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 53 Attack 111
Defense 48 Defense 101
Special Attack 53 Special Attack 111
Special Defense 48 Special Defense 101


Pansage


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pansage Leaf Stone Simisage N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 53 Attack 111
Defense 48 Defense 101
Special Attack 53 Special Attack 111
Special Defense 48 Special Defense 101


Pansear


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pansear Fire Stone Simisear N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 53 Attack 111
Defense 48 Defense 101
Special Attack 53 Special Attack 111
Special Defense 48 Special Defense 101


Patrat


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Patrat Level 20 Watchog N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 39 Defense 83
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 39 Special Defense 83


Pawniard


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pawniard Level 52 Bisharp N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Pelipper


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Wingull Level 25 Pelipper N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 100 Defense 205
Special Attack 85 Special Attack 175
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Petilil


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Petilil Sun Stone Lilligant N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 35 Attack 75
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Pichu


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pichu Happy Ribbon Pikachu Thunderstone Raichu

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 20 Maximum HP 150
Attack 40 Attack 85
Defense 15 Defense 35
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 35 Special Defense 75


Pignite


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tepig Level 17 Pignite Level 36 Emboar

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 90 Maximum HP 290
Attack 93 Attack 191
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 70 Special Attack 145
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Pikachu


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pichu Happy Ribbon Pikachu Thunderstone Raichu

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 35 Maximum HP 180
Attack 55 Attack 115
Defense 30 Defense 65
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 40 Special Defense 85


Piloswine


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Swinub Level 33 Piloswine Know AncientPower? Mamoswine

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 100 Maximum HP 310
Attack 100 Attack 205
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Purugly


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Glameow Level 38 Purugly N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 71 Maximum HP 252
Attack 82 Attack 169
Defense 64 Defense 133
Special Attack 64 Special Attack 133
Special Defense 59 Special Defense 123


Quagsire


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Wooper Level 20 Quagsire N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 65 Special Defense 135


Raichu


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pichu Happy Ribbon Pikachu Thunderstone Raichu

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 90 Attack 185
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 90 Special Attack 185
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Rampardos


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Cranidos Level 30 Rampardos N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 97 Maximum HP 304
Attack 165 Attack 335
Defense 60 Defense 125
Special Attack 65 Special Attack 135
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Reshiram

  • National Dex Number: #643
  • Pokémon Type: Fire/Dragon
  • Potential Locations:
    • Ivory Peak; cannot be recruited

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Reshiram N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 100 Maximum HP 310
Attack 120 Attack 245
Defense 100 Defense 205
Special Attack 150 Special Attack 305
Special Defense 120 Special Defense 245


Roggenrola


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Roggenrola Level 25 Boldore Link Cable Gigalith

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 75 Attack 155
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 25 Special Attack 55
Special Defense 25 Special Defense 55


Rufflet


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Rufflet Level 54 Braviary N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 70 Maximum HP 250
Attack 83 Attack 171
Defense 50 Defense 105
Special Attack 37 Special Attack 79
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Salamence


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Bagon Level 30 Shelgon Level 50 Salamence

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 135 Attack 275
Defense 80 Defense 165
Special Attack 110 Special Attack 225
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Samurott


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Oshawott Level 17 Dewott Level 36 Samurott

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 95 Maximum HP 300
Attack 100 Attack 205
Defense 85 Defense 175
Special Attack 108 Special Attack 221
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Sandile


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sandile Level 29 Krokorok Level 40 Krookodile

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 72 Attack 149
Defense 35 Defense 75
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 35 Special Defense 75


Scolipede


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Venipede Level 22 Whirlipede Level 30 Scolipede

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 90 Attack 185
Defense 89 Defense 183
Special Attack 55 Special Attack 115
Special Defense 69 Special Defense 143


Scrafty


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Scraggy Level 39 Scrafty N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 90 Attack 185
Defense 115 Defense 235
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 115 Special Defense 235


Scraggy


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Scraggy Level 39 Scrafty N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 75 Attack 155
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 35 Special Attack 75
Special Defense 70 Special Defense 145


Seismitoad


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tympole Level 25 Palpitoad Level 36 Seismitoad

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 105 Maximum HP 320
Attack 85 Attack 175
Defense 75 Defense 155
Special Attack 85 Special Attack 175
Special Defense 75 Special Defense 155


Serperior


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Snivy Level 17 Servine Level 36 Serperior

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 75 Attack 155
Defense 95 Defense 195
Special Attack 75 Special Attack 155
Special Defense 95 Special Defense 195


Servine


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Snivy Level 17 Servine Level 36 Serperior

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 60 Maximum HP 230
Attack 60 Attack 125
Defense 75 Defense 155
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 75 Special Defense 155


Sewaddle


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sewaddle Level 20 Swadloon Happy Ribbon Leavanny

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 53 Attack 111
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 40 Special Attack 85
Special Defense 60 Special Defense 125


Shelgon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Bagon Level 30 Shelgon Level 50 Salamence

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 95 Attack 195
Defense 100 Defense 205
Special Attack 60 Special Attack 125
Special Defense 50 Special Defense 105


Simipour


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Panpour Water Stone Simipour N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 98 Attack 201
Defense 63 Defense 131
Special Attack 98 Special Attack 201
Special Defense 63 Special Defense 131


Simisage


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pansage Leaf Stone Simisage N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 98 Attack 201
Defense 63 Defense 131
Special Attack 98 Special Attack 201
Special Defense 63 Special Defense 131


Simisear


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Pansear Fire Stone Simisear N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 98 Attack 201
Defense 63 Defense 131
Special Attack 98 Special Attack 201
Special Defense 63 Special Defense 131


Snivy


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Snivy Level 17 Servine Level 36 Serperior

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 45 Maximum HP 200
Attack 45 Attack 95
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Stoutland


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Lillipup Level 16 Herdier Level 32 Stoutland

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 85 Maximum HP 280
Attack 100 Attack 205
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 185


Swadloon


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Sewaddle Level 20 Swadloon Happy Ribbon Leavanny

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 55 Maximum HP 220
Attack 63 Attack 131
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 50 Special Attack 105
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Swanna


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Ducklett Level 35 Swanna N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 78 Maximum HP 260
Attack 87 Attack 179
Defense 63 Defense 131
Special Attack 87 Special Attack 179
Special Defense 63 Special Defense 131


Swinub


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Swinub Level 33 Piloswine Know AncientPower? Mamoswine

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 50 Maximum HP 210
Attack 50 Attack 105
Defense 40 Defense 85
Special Attack 30 Special Attack 65
Special Defense 30 Special Defense 65


Swoobat


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Woobat Happy Ribbon Swoobat N/A - No evolutions beyond here.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 67 Maximum HP 244
Attack 57 Attack 119
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 77 Special Attack 159
Special Defense 55 Special Defense 115


Tepig


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tepig Level 17 Pignite Level 36 Emboar

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 65 Maximum HP 240
Attack 63 Attack 131
Defense 45 Defense 95
Special Attack 45 Special Attack 95
Special Defense 45 Special Defense 95


Terrakion

  • National Dex Number: #639
  • Pokémon Type: Rock/Fighting
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Terrakion N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 91 Maximum HP 323
Attack 129 Attack 263
Defense 90 Defense 185
Special Attack 72 Special Attack 149
Special Defense 90 Special Defense 185


Thundurus

  • National Dex Number: #642
  • Pokémon Type: Electric/Flying
  • Potential Locations:

EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Thundurus N/A - No more evolutions beyond this point.

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 79 Maximum HP 268
Attack 115 Attack 235
Defense 70 Defense 145
Special Attack 125 Special Attack 255
Special Defense 80 Special Defense 165


Timburr


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Timburr Level 25 Gurdurr Link Cable Conkeldurr

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 75 Maximum HP 260
Attack 80 Attack 165
Defense 55 Defense 115
Special Attack 25 Special Attack 55
Special Defense 35 Special Defense 75


Tirtouga


EVOLUTION CHART
First Stage Stage 1-to-2 Method Second Stage Stage 2-to-3 Method Third Stage
Tirtouga Level 34 Carracosta N/A - No evolutions beyond here

BASE STATS BASE LEVEL 100 STATS
Statistic Value Statistic Value
Maximum HP 54 Maximum HP 218
Attack 78 Attack 161
Defense