Pokémon X / Y FAQ/Walkthrough


Did you enjoy this FAQ and find it useful? If so, please consider clicking the blue "Recommendation" link above here so you can let others know that this is one of GameFAQs's best FAQs! Thank you!

                   _____      _
                  |  __ \    | |
                  | |__) |__ | | _____ _ __ ___   ___  _ __
                  |  ___/ _ \| |/ / _ \ '_ ` _ \ / _ \| '_ \
                  | |  | (_) |   <  __/ | | | | | (_) | | | |
                  |_|   \___/|_|\_\___|_| |_| |_|\___/|_| |_|
                 __    __                     _      __     __
                 \ \  / /                    | |     \ \   / /
                  \ \/ /       __ _ _ __   __| |      \ \_/ /
                   >  <       / _` | '_ \ / _` |       \   /
                  / /\ \     | (_| | | | | (_| |        | |
                 /_/  \_\     \__,_|_| |_|\__,_|        |_|

  • Games: Pokémon X & Y
  • Console: Nintendo 3DS
  • File Type: Formatted FAQ/Walkthrough
  • Author: KeyBlade999 (a.k.a. Daniel Chaviers)
  • Version: v2.70
  • Time of Update: 10:18 PM 5/9/2014
  • File Size: 1,203 KB



Donations

While I do write all of my guides for free, it does take a lot of time and effort to put them together. If you're feeling generous and want to show your appreciation, I am gladly accepting donations. I don't know exactly what the donations will be used for, but just know that you would definitely be helping me make more quality FAQs! Even the smallest donation amounts are appreciated, and they are a great way to say how much you appreciate the work I do. If you do decide you'd like to donate, please send the donations through PayPal at the e-mail address listed below. Thank you so very much for at least considering this!!

Donation/Contact E-Mail

keyblade999.faqs@gmail.com





Introduction

Bonjour, and welcome to my first 3DS FAQ in a while. After having written a swathe of FAQs for a number of 3DS games over the summer (Mario & Luigi: Dream Team and Shin Megami Tensei IV being the most recent), I basically took a break and rewound a bit to some of my more arcane tastes - namely Japanese games on the NES. Of course, temptation would finally get the better of me as summer turned to fall with a game I had ordered over eight months prior: Pokémon X & Y!

Pokémon may very well be my favorite game series: ever since I was entranced with FireRed back in 2004, I eventually had played all of them by 2008 (that were out) and continued to pre-order more and more of them. Eventually, this got to the point of writing FAQs for each one of the mainstream games - an unrivaled feat met back in 2012. (I have a LOT of time on my hands. =P) Still, I suppose it can't be all good. Ever since Generations II & III, I've seemed to notice a rather odd trend in the mainstream "Version" games - while they've all gotten flashier, the gameplay has gotten less innovative and more repetitive.

Perhaps Pokémon X & Y can change that? The first mainstream titles for the 3DS have to offer *something* else that Diamond, Pearl, Black, White, and the swathe of others could not - beyond a new region and some new Poké's to catch, of course. Already, we've heard of the new "Fairy" type, and there's also the ability for Mega-Evolution. You can also take into account the fact that the game was released worldwide on October 12th, 2013, meaning that we Americans finally get a chance to beat the Japanese who don't have the whopping six-plus months to train that they usually do. =P

All of my mindless babbling aside, I hope you enjoy my FAQ as you explore the Kalos region!!





Walkthrough

Notes (READ!)

Here, I will try to briefly describe some of the stuff you will see as you navigate through this FAQ/Walkthrough - primarily overly-technical stuff you'll find in tables at the start of sections so I don't have to pointlessly describe this stuff in an area using several paragraphs while only writing a two-word walkthrough. Plus, it's a nice quick-paste bank for me. =P If you don't see some of this stuff for a particular area, assume that means none of that is there: no Pokémon encounters table, no Pokémon.

LOCALIZATION: Pokémon X/Y had a worldwide release on October 12th, 2013, for the Nintendo 3DS. In correlation with that, each cartridge and download was given a variety of languages the player can play in: English, Spanish, Japanese, French, Gernman, Italian, and Korean. This guide was written from a North American release of the game, played in the English language, as a male character; if you're playing in another language, be prepared to use Google Translate a lot. Primarily - as in, except in version-exclusive details - this walkthrough was written from the viewpoint of Pokémon X. Pokémon Y was used, of course, but lightly, only for exclusive details (not necessarily just wild Pokémon...).

DIVISIONS: Each badge's section will begin with a sectional flowchart. This flowchart denotes the areas we'll go to whilst traversing to the named badge, and in the order named. These sections will be headed off with two horizontal lines above and below the section's name. Any sub-divisions from there, if any, will be denoted with ~ B2F ~.

TABLE INFORMATION: We'll finish off the rest of this section with an analysis on the type of data that you'll see throughout this FAQ. Most of the info not represented here (treasure checklists, shops, and the like) should be obvious enough to keep me from having to detail it. As for the table data? It's below. Take note that it is mostly fake; it's just to test column widths and such on my end. First, we'll cover the Wild Encounters data; it will be divided into individual methods (e.g. in the grass, Surfing) as needed; if not stated, assume the main thing in the area to be that method.


LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV Yield Version
Magikarp Electric/Flying Static 1 Sp.Def. Both
Pikachu Electric Compoundeyes 1 Defense X
Zigzagoon Normal Competitive 1 Sp.Atk., 1 Sp.Def. Y

  • Pokémon Species: Denotes what kind of Pokémon it is: it's default English name, really.

  • Pokémon Type: Type is used to determine extra damage multipliers when fighting.

  • Abilities: All Pokémon have some sort of ability that activates in battle (or rarely in the field) to help you out.


  • Version: There are two versions for this particular Pokémon release: Pokémon X and Pokémon Y. Depending on which you have, a number of things can vary: everything will be noted, don't worry. In this case, you'll see the letter for a version (X or Y) if the Pokémon is exclusive to it, or "Both" if it is non-exclusive.


POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both Rayquaza Reshiram Fire/Dragon Turboblaze
X [none] Magikarp Water Rain Dish

Most of the info denoted here can be derived from the wild encounters table. This basically will note possible Pokémon trades or gifts in an area. The first row of the table denotes what a trade will look like, while the second is what a gift will look like: note how the second row as a "[none]" in the "Pokémon Given" column to note that it comes for free. As for the fifth column, note that it says likely - that means the most common ability for the Poké.


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Master KeyBlade999 $999,999,999 Rayquaza Lv. 1, Hydreigon Lv. 255, Missingno. Lv. 0
Youngster Billy $100 Zigzagoon Lv. 10, Pikachu Lv. 11
Biker Young $50 Snivy Lv. 20 (x2), Tepig Lv. 50 (x4)
Swimmer Aqua $200 Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Torchic, Treecko; all Lv. 20

This table denotes some data on trainers in an area. Included are their name, the money earned from the battle, and their Pokémon party. No info is given on actual strategy as this info is usually very repetitive and pointless; except in a low-level game, you should be able to win the battles if you've progressed this far. Of particular note are some notations in the latter two rows. The "(x#)" notation means that there are # Pokémon of that species and level - not necessarily anything else - in that trainer's party. In the latter, that means that all five of those Pokémon are Level 20; it helps to save some room on both ends. Of course, this is placed only in an "If I have to" instance, since I'm writing this pre-format section pre-launch, so you might not even see 'em.


BOSS: Master KeyBlade999

  • Rewards: $999,999,999, Earth Badge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Arceus Fairy Level 100 N/A
Kyogre Water Level 53 N/A
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 50 Chose Bulbasaur as a starter
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 50 Chose Squirtle as a starter
Blastoise Water Level 50 Chose Charmander as a starter
Pikachu Electric Level 66 Playing Pokémon X
Pichu Electric Level 33 Playing Pokémon Y


This blue box is used to denote relatively difficult boss battles: typically Gym Leaders and the like. Initially, you'll see the various rewards for the battle. Next is that trainer's party. Note that, like all mainstream games, the opponent's party may differ depending on the circumstances of the battle. For example, all of the mainstream games have have at least one of your rival's Pokémon differ depending on which starter you choose; Pokémon Black and White Versions even had that done doubly since you had two rivals and thusly all three starters distributed amongst you. (The rest of the table is pretty obvious.) Finally, below the table, will come some sort of strategy. As per my other Pokémon FAQs, it will primarily consist of several things: the Pokémon's type advantages/weaknesses, notably annoying moves, and perhaps Pokémon that would be ideal for this.


Bug Badge



Sectional Flowchart






Game Start-Up



^sr2|

Assuming you've bought a used copy, you may need to erase your save file: hold Up, B, and X as the game loads for that.

When you pop in the 3DS cartridge into your 3DS/XL/2DS for the first time, the game will briefly prepare for gameplay by prepping a save file. In conjunction with the worldwide release of Pokémon X/Y, you can play in a number of languages: English, Spanish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Korean. Keep in mind that this choice is quite permanent, and I doubt you Americans wanna play 50+ hours of Pokémon in Korean. ... Right ...? Anyhow, pick whatever language you wish; I'll be using English.

After the brief 3D sequence, press Start at the title screen where the game gives a dynamic view of ... well, you'll figure it out. You'll soon meet with Professor Augustine Sycamore - following the near-unintetrupted tradition of tree names on male professors. After a brief speech, you'll choose your character's gender and appearance ... and name, of course! Now, into the Kalos region we go!




Vaniville Town & Route 1



Your adventure will begin as you get awakened by a Fletchling that flies in an pecks you square in the gut. (Sadly, it's not yours. What a shame: they're quite useful when they evolve.) Head east and look in the mirror to get appropriately dressed - c'mon, even Ash Ketchum had to get out of his pajamas for his journey. Head south and downstairs to meet your mother, apparently the owner the Fletchling. She advises you to step out, so do so.

Once outside, you'll meet Serena/Calem and Shauna - which of the first two depends on whether you are playing a male or female; you'll get one of the opposite gender. They go off to meet Prof. Sycamore in Aquacorde Town. There's not much to do in Vaniville, so just go west and north to the next area. This takes you to Route 1, quite literally the shortest route in all of Pokémon ... but what a nice theme! *jigs*

Oh. Right. Aquacorde.




Aquacorde Town



^sr3|The Kalos starters.

ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Pokédex [_] Prof's Letter

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability Notes
Both [none] Chespin Grass Overgrow You only get one!
Both [none] Fennekin Fire Blaze
Both [none] Froakie Water Torrent

Once in Aquacorde, go north and you'll eventually be shouted at. Head west from there to meet the other four "chosen ones" of Prof. Sycamore. You'll meet Tierno, Trevor, and you already met the other two. They quickly decide to nickname you. Choose what you will. After, Tierno brings out the Pokémon. Pictured to the right, you'll see Chespin, Fennekin, and Froakie. My analyses?

  • Chespin: Like all Grass-types, Chespin is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison. It will have type-based advantages over Ground, Water, and Rock. Chespin will suffer early on as the first Gym type is Bug. He does evolve at Level 16. He will evolve again at Level 36 into Chesnaught. This Pokémon is of the Grass/Fighting type, which has weaknesses to Flying (4x), Fire, Ice, Psychic, and Fairy. This Pokémon will likely suffer the most throughout the game, and is recommended for series veterans. Then again, of all the Pokémon, he is the most likely to get an advantage over Fairy through Poison-type moves, but Bulbasaur's chain earned later on is better for that.

  • Fennekin: Fennekin the fire-fox Pokémon is weak to Ground, Rock, and Water while having type-based advantages over Steel, Ice, Grass, and Bug. Fennekin will do well in the first Gym, which is Bug, but will stumble with the second, which is Rock. However, by then you'll be able to counteract that weakness. Fennekin also evolves at Level 16, then again at Level 36. The final evolution into Delphox is Fire/Psychic, adding advantages to Fighting and Poison while adding weaknesses to Ghost and Dark. Fennekin is great for beginners.

  • Froakie: Ribbit. Froakie is weak to Grass and Electric solely, while being advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground. He will fine up until the four Gym, having only an advantage in the second until then - by then, the weakness is readily counteracted. Future Gyms, however, will take a toll on Froakie. He will evolve at Level 16, then later on to Greninja at Level 36, who adds advantages to Ghost and Psychic and weaknesses to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug (plus a Psychic immunity). He is good for the average player.

After having chosen your Pokémon - I chose Fennekin, simply because it's so cute~! - feel free to nickname it. Shauna will then pick the type yours is superior to (Chespin for me) and Serena/Calem chooses the last one who will likely murder your own (Froakie for me). You'll also receive the Pokédex, an item that can record data on all of the now-721 Pokémon of the world. This includes Kalos, which has been divided into the Coastal, Mountain, and Central regions, each housing around 150 species. You'll also get Prof's Letter for your mother. Go back to Vaniville Town and deliver it.

As you do so, however, you'll be shoved into a battle with Shauna! I was waiting for this! >:)


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Shauna

  • Rewards: $500, free healing

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Chespin Grass Level 5 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Fennekin Fire Level 5 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Froakie Water Level 5 Your Kalos starter is Chespin

  • Chespin: This Pokémon is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Poison, and Bug. It notably knows Vine Whip, a Grass-type move.
  • Fennekin: This Pokémon is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. It notably knows Ember, a Fire-type move that may burn.
  • Froakie: This Pokémon is weak to Grass and Electric. It knows Bubble, which is super-effective on Rock, Ground, and Fire.

Strategically, this is more of a practice battle. When the battle begins, you have four options: Fight (use an attack), Bag (use an item), Run (only works with wild Pokémon), and Pokémon (switch Pokémon). Hm. Since you're broke, are fighting a Trainer, and have only one Pokémon, that means violence is the solution, right? Lucky you, Shauna chose a Pokémon weak to your own, while both already know their elemental moves: Ember for Fennekin, Vine Whip for Chespin, and Bubble for Froakie. In fact, just use the aforementioned three moves until you win - it will only take two hits. (Take note that each use of a move costs one PP - this unit measures how much a move can be used before it needs to be restored with an Ether.)

As another note, your Pokémon will gain EXP. for winning. EXP. will let your Pokémon - eventually - level-up, and therefore power-up and maybe even evolve. So it's not a good idea to flee. Just FYI.


After the battle, continue back to Vaniville.



Vaniville Town - You've Got Mail


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Town Map

After the battle with Shauna, take your $500 and continue back south across Route 1 into Vaniville. Head into your house east of the entrance (c'mon, what other house has a big Rhyhorn in front of it!?) to find your mom. She rushes upstairs after reading the "love letter", handing you a change of clothes and a Town Map. Okey-dokey, then. Go ahead  and leave. As you return back towards Route 1, your pet Rhyhorn will cuddle up to you, saying good-bye. Aww... Head back to Aquacorde.



Aquacorde Revisited!



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Potion

AQUACORDE TOWN POKÉBALL SHOP
Item Name Cost Effect
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!

AQUACORDE TOWN MEDICINE SHOP
Item Name Cost Effect
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.

This time when you re-enter the town, head north and past the staircase. Head on down it and speak with the dude at the bottom for a free Potion, used to heal your Pokémon's HP in (or out) of battle. In a building to the west, you can buy up some Pokéballs! Buy at least ten; that'll get you well-suited for the game for the next hour or so, plus also give you a free Premier Ball. w00t, I just shaved about 9% off your total bill. ^_^ East of that shop, you can find a place to heal Pokémon if hurt. And, south of there, you can buy Potions and such. Buy three or so before leaving.

As you head north of the fountain in the square, you'll be notified that standing and walking in tall grass can initiate wild Pokémon battles. (Wild Pokémon can be caught, unlike Trainers' Pokémon.) Cross onto Route 2!




Route 2



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Poké Ball x10

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Caterpie Bug Shield Dust, Run Away 1 HP Both
Fletchling Normal/Flying Big Pecks, Gale Wings 1 Speed Both
Pidgey Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 1 Speed Both
Scatterbug Bug Shield Dust, Compoundeyes, Friend Guard 1 Defense Both
Weedle Bug/Poison Shield Dust, Run Away 1 Speed Both
Zigzagoon Normal Gluttony, Pickup, Quick Feet 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Youngster Austin $120 Zigzagoon Lv. 5

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Ah, there's a lot of good Pokémon on this Route. Pidgey is a must-have for any Trainer, as anyone having played the Kanto games would know. He's good against Fighters, Bugs (our next Gym!), and Grass Pokémon, for example, not to mention is able to use Fly once you get the HM for it waaaay down the road. Fletchling is a good idea, and possibly a decent alternate if you're having trouble finding Pidgey, for it evolves into the Fire/Flying type Fletchinder - if you don't plan on getting Fennekin or Charmander anytime soon, that's a Pokémon to have! Weedle and Caterpie are known as well for being quick to evolve by Level 10 into Metapod-then-Butterfree and Kakuna-then-Beedrill, respectively, so there's something to look at for those wanting to fill their Pokédex. Then there's Zigzagoon. I recall a lot of times back in Ruby/Sapphire using him to slave for HMs, so that might be a good idea: plus, his possible Pickup ability can get you items as rare as Rare Candies. (No, seriously, there's a Pokémon Ruby TAS abusing that!) Finally, Bunnelby. Perhaps you want 'im, perhaps not; however, there's a trade to be had later you'll probably want to do anyways.

^sr4|Go, Poké Ball!

CATCHING POKÉMON: Seeing as you probably don't know much about catching Pokémon at this point... To catch Pokémon, your initial goal is to weaken them by using moves and attacks - however, you don't want to kill them, just get HP as low as possible. (Later on, False Swipe or Super Fang (latter must be learned) can be made available to prevent such pointless deaths.) At that point, you also want to apply a status; this is what Bug Pokémon like the evolutionary chains of Weedle/Caterpie are good for. Ideally, Paralysis will do - this allows the catch rate to be further boosted. Frozen and Sleeping Pokémon have a 33% higher catch rate than those paralyzed, but those statuses are not permanent, and I don't think there's a non-damaging instant-Freeze move out there. From there, you throw Pokéballs - some Pokéballs are suited to certain situations, such as the Dusk Ball has a quadruple catch rate at night! That's the basics of it. You'll get a reiteration of this tutorial in a few moments, but mine's better.


NOTE TO VETERANS

Catching Pokémon will now allow you to gain what I believe is the same level of EXP. you would have gained as if you had simply KO'ed the Pokémon. In previous mainstream Pokémon games, such was not the case.


So, onto the walkthrough...

Once you enter the Route, go north and into the grass - I ended up finding a Pidgey, which is pretty quick for two grass tiles. =/ Past the grass, in fact, you'll meet Shauna and Serena/Calem. The latter will give a Pokémon capture tutorial against a Bunnelby (using a Fletchling). Pay attention, but I already outlined the main points above. (Wow! The Pokémon went INSIDE the Poké Ball!?) You'll earn ten Poké Balls before Serena/Calem flees.

Continue north and into and through the grass. Past it, you'll find a Youngster with a Zigzagoon to battle. Whenever you walk into the sight range - some Trainers are VERY shortsighted lol - of a Trainer, you will begin battle with him or her, so you know. These battles cannot be run from, and you cannot catch their Pokémon - it's a fight to the death as it were. Beat this guy - just use moves of your Pokémon's type for the STAB bonus - and move on into the forest. (If you need a heal, you can go back to Aquacorde and heal up in the northeast building of the square.)




Santalune Forest



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Potion [_] Antidote [_] Potion [_] Poké Ball [_] Poké Ball [_] Potion

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Caterpie Bug Shield Dust, Run Away 1 HP Both
Fletchling Normal/Flying Big Pecks, Gale Wings 1 Speed Both
Kakuna Bug/Poison Shed Skin 2 Defense Both
Metapod Bug Shed Skin 2 Defense Both
Panpour Water Gluttony, Torrent 1 Speed Both
Pansage Grass Gluttony, Overgrow 1 Speed Both
Pansear Fire Gluttony, Blaze 1 Speed Both
Pikachu Electric Static, Lightningrod 2 Speed Both
Scatterbug Bug Shield Dust, Compoundeyes, Friend Guard 1 Defense Both
Weedle Bug/Poison Shield Dust, Run Away 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Youngster Joey $72 Scatterbug Lv. 3, Fletchling Lv. 3
Lass Anna $120 Pikachu Lv. 3
Lass Lise $96 Weedle Lv. 2, Bunnelby Lv. 4

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Let's say you miraculously manage to find Pansear, Pansage, or Panpour here. Veterans of the series probably remember Black/White Versions where you got a starter, then one of these simians to accompany it and cover some of its weaknesses in the first gym, right? A similar idea should work here, although you may have to work for it. Keep in mind that you do get another starter sooner or later, though. Fennekin users should aim for Pansage or Panpour, Chespin users want Pansear and Panpour, and Froakie users want Pansage and Pansear. In fact, Pansear (or a Flying Pokémon) is good given that our first Gym is Bug-typed. Pikachu is also a good one to stick around and grind for - Electric types, as always, are rare, and why not let your first be the series mascot!? Gym-wise, though, he won't have much use until the sixth or seventh Gym, but nonetheless.

TRIVIA

If you've played Pokémon Yellow Version: Special Pikachu Edition, or some of the side-series games like PokéPark and Pokémon Channel, you probably recall those being some of the few instances where Pokémon used their voices from the anime that sounded like their own name ("Pika-pika!") rather than the generic static we mainstream gamers got. ... Now try finding Pikachu. ;) It'll make it worth it.


ALLIED TRAINERS: When some creepy person decides to tail you, you can speak with them to get freely healed: it's no longer automatic like in Black and White! Additionally, they may participate in double battles with you. (Double battles are two-on-two.)

Once you enter the forest, take a few steps north and Shauna will join you. Go northeast and grab the Potion from the Pokéball on the ground. Head far to the west and then north of the southwest corner to get the Poison-healing Antidote. Go back east to the kid trying to save his game (what?), then go north and west to find a Potion. Now return to the forest entrance and go east and north along the dirt path. As you bypass some of the dudes from Aquacorde, Shauna will suddenly decide to give you a Paralyze Heal - which is useful, since the Pikachus in this forest have Static, which mean contact moves like Tackle have a 10% chance of getting you paralyzed. Zzzap.

Continue along and you'll see a Youngster just hanging out near a ledge. Flyswat his Scatterbug. (Why the heck do I want to say Scuttlebug so freakin' much!? And why is a Youngster named Joey seemingly in every game!?) Head west and south from there and run along the path for a bit. As you turn west for the third time, a blond girl will run up to you in a craze - Pikachu, use Thun-- Oh. Never mind. Just speak with her to get a Poké Ball. Further along, you'll battle Lass Anna. Eventually, you'll reach a fork heading east and west. Go east to battle another Lass, Lise. Go east to find another Pokéball on the ground containing ... oh, wait, it is a Poké Ball. =/ Go west for a while to find a Potion, then head north to meet up with your friends. Continue on to Route 3.




Route 3



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Super Potion [_] Adventure Rules

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Azurill Normal/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 1 HP Both
Bidoof Normal Simple, Unaware, Sudden Impulse 1 HP Both
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Burmy Bug Shed Skin, Overcoat 1 Sp.Def.Both
Dunsparce Normal Run Away, Serene Grace, Rattled 1 HP Both
Fletchling Normal/Flying Big Pecks, Gale Wings 1 Speed Both
Pidgey Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 1 Speed Both
Pikachu Electric Static, Lightningrod 2 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Preschooler Oliver $64 Caterpie Lv. 2, Azurill Lv. 4
Preschooler Ella $80 Pichu Lv. 5
Schoolgirl Bridget $192 Bidoof Lv. 6
Schoolboy Brighton $96 Pansage Lv. 3, Panpour Lv. 3, Pansear Lv. 3

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Here, there's not a whole lot you can capture for usefulness than what has already been possible. Pikachu, Pidgey, and Fletchling are the highlights here. Dunsparce isn't too bad of a Pokémon - its stats are about average except for HP, which is a bit high - especially given the varied types of moves you can get for it through TMs/HMs. Bidoof is also notable as an HM slave from Generation IV.

During the cutscene, you'll get the Adventure Rules. (As a note of trivia, "Adventure Rules" typically were found by examining your or your rival's home PC in previous games, but only showed two not ten rules.) Once you regain control, go north and you'll find some li'l kids to battle as well as some grass to chew on. (Another of the former is further north.) Past there, go north and west, then downstairs. After some rude motherf-- *ahem* Sorry.

Anyways, after the rude dude almost knocks you down on his rollerblades, go north. While you cannot go past here, do note that this green tree - much different looking than normal - can be cut down with the aptly-named Cut HM in the future. Go south of the stairs for now to find Bridget. South of her, you can see a ledge. These can be hopped down as shortcuts or means of travel: all you need to do is run "into" it. With the southbound one, this will let you reach a Super Potion, which heals 50 HP. Go south, west, and north of there to find another Trainer to fight. Then just run on north into town.




Santalune City



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Great Ball [_] X Attack x3 [_] X Defense x3

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both Bunnelby Farfetch'd Normal/Flying Keen Eye

SANTALUNE CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Dire Hit $650 Raises the user's critical-hit rate until withdrawawl or win/loss.
Guard Spec. $700 Stops stat reduction on your party for five turns.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
X Accuracy $950 Raises accuracy until battle's end or the Pokémon's withdrawal.
X Attack $500 Boosts Attack in battle until battle's end or the Pokémon withdraws.
X Defense $550 Boosts Defense in battle until battle's end or the Pokémon withdraws.
X Sp. Atk. $350 Boosts Special Attack until battle's end or the Pokémon's withdrawal.
X Sp. Def. $350 Boosts Special Defense until battle's end or the Pokémon's withdrawal.
X Speed $350 Boosts Speed in battle until battle's end or the Pokémon withdraws.

As you enter town, go north and into the red building to find the Pokémon Center. Similar to Pokémon Black/White onward, within is also a PokéMart. Basically, the Pokémon Center is now a one-stop shop for healing, shopping, PC usage, and fine dining. [Disclaimer: Fine dining offer invalid after October 11th, 2013.] Shop and heal, then leave.

Next door is a shop for clothing, if you're the type to waste money on your character's appearance. -_- If you head due west from the Pokémon Center into the southwesternmost building, the girl walking around can detail the effects of the Gym Badges if you like. The woman in the house next door can tell you in general how Happy a Pokémon is - some Pokémon evolve based on having a high-enough level of Happiness, heightened through certain items, using the Pokémon, walking around with it, and so on.

If you go northeast to the Roselia fountain, then east and into the house, you can get a Great Ball. The Great Ball is like a normal Poké Ball, but its catch rate is 50% higher (x1.5, not x1.0). They'rrrrrre great! If you head into the house to the far west of the fountain, then you can trade a Bunnelby for a Level 10 Farfetch'd. That's rather far-fe-- *smack* Anyhow, traded Pokémon earn more EXP. during battles, plus ... well, I'm certain you don't have it. Additionally, Farfetch'd has Aerial Ace, a 90-Power (on him) no-miss Flying-type move that will DOMINATE in the next Gym. However, if a traded Pokémon gets too high of a level, it won't obey you, so watch out! (Your own Pokémon from this file will always obey.) If you don't have a Bunnelby, exit the city to the northeast onto Route 22 - you can find some there.

North of the fountain is the Trainers' School, which ... well, it mostly explains basics. Within, you can speak with the elderly man for three X Attacks and three X Defenses. That's about it. You can head out onto Route 22 for some extra training, which I wholesomely recommend. If not, just head onto the Santalune City Gym.




Route 22



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Azurill Normal/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 1 HP Both
Bidoof Normal Simple, Unaware, Sudden Impulse 1 HP Both
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Farfetch'd Normal/Flying Inner Focus, Keen Eye, Defiant 1 Attack Both
Litleo Normal/Fire Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Psyduck Water Cloud Nine, Damp, Swift Swim 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Riolu Fighting Inner Focus, Steadfast, Mischieveous Heart 1 AttackBoth

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Rising Star Louise $420 Psyduck Lv. 6, Litleo Lv. 7
Lass Elin $144 Goldeen Lv. 6, Marill Lv. 6
Rising Star Loïc $540 Riolu Lv. 9
Schoolboy Rabbie $160 Pidgey Lv. 7, Metapod Lv. 5
Schoolgirl Mickenzie $256 Bunnelby Lv. 8
Lass Elsa $192 Flabébé Lv. 8

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Eh. Litleo is suitable, if leveled up some (they come around Level 6) to fight the Bug-type Gym ahead if you didn't get ANY of the numerous Pokémon I've requested: Pidgey/Pigeotto, Fletching/Fletchinder, Fennekin, Pansear, Farfetch'd... (I recommend the Farfetch'd from the trade in Santalune, NOT the one found in the wild on Route 22. The former has Aerial Ace and comes at Level 10.) Bidoof still remains a good choice for HM slavery after he evolves into Bibarel. Riolu would also make a great addition for the second Gym if you can get his Happiness high enough and level him up during the daytime to make him Lucario (or just get Force Palm around Level 15); the final Gym also would see success in Lucario.

As you enter the route, go east and north to find Rising Star Louise. Defeat her Pokémon, then go east to find another Trainer to battle. Battle in some of the grass nearby if you want, then head east past the sign to battle a Rising Star. (Dude has Riolu. Lucky...) A Schoolboy can be found in the grass to the south of there, with a Schoolgirl to the southeast. If you continue south from there, you can see a ledge to the west. The guy next to it describes what Poké-vets already know: if you leap over that by running over it, it's one-way.

Anyhow, continue south to the Lass and beat her. That'll finish off this area. To the south is an area you need Surf to cross. To the east is Victory Road (which you need eight Badges to enter, and you haven't even one) and more of Kalos (which you are too weak to take on). So, return to Santalune and heal.




Santalune City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Roller Skates [_] TM83 (Infestation) [_] Bug Badge

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Roller Skater Rinka $244 Zigzaggon Lv. 7
Youngster David $240 Ledyba Lv. 10
Youngster Zachary $240 Spewpa Lv. 10
Lass Charlotte $216 Kakuna Lv. 7, Combee Lv. 9

Once you have healed your Pokémon and made a party advantageous to Bugs (Fire, Flying, Rock), head to the building in the northeast corner of Santalune. Defeat Roller Skater Rinka - the girl in front of the Gym - to earn a pair of Roller Skates. A substitute for the Bicycle, the Roller Skates are automatically used when you use the Circle Pad: the D-Pad now is for walking. Doesn't really matter, though. ^_^

Well, except that you almost have to walk into buildings. >_< Enter the Gym already. Hop on the pole like the person you wanna be. ... What? I meant the person who enters the Gym.

When you arrive on tha-- oh, my, my arachnophobia. *curls up in a nonexistant corner* Anyhow, head southeast alone the white web (you can only travel on the white ones) and you'll fight David. From here, if you go to the edge, southwest to the south-center, north until you can go west, then go northwest and north to the west-center, west, to the edge, north and northeast to the northwest-center, southeast and immediately northeast, then east to battle a Lass. From there, you can go north to the Gym Leader. (You can battle another Youngster for EXP. if you head southwest where I last made you turn northeast.)

If you're confused, here's a map. Blue is the main path, green is the optional battle path, and the center is the start.


^l5|

BOSS: Gym Leader Viola

  • Rewards: $1,920; TM83 (Infestation); Bug Badge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Surskit Water/Bug Level 10 N/A
Vivillon Bug/Flying Level 12 N/A

  • Surskit: Surskit is weak to Grass, Electric, Flying, and Rock. It can use the Water-type Bubble to hurt Fire-types namely, as well as Rock-types and Ground-types. Its Water Sport will strengthen this move.

  • Vivillon: This one is weak to Rock (4x), Fire, Flying, Electric, and Ice, and is immune to Ground. The main problem here is Infestation: it deals damage continually and prevents switching out. When you KO Surskit, it is ideal to put in a fresh face for that reason.

Strategically, this battle is pretty easy if, again, you've done as I've recommended in the past.  Those with Fennekin or Pansear should keep that Pokémon out of the battle momentarily in favor of Chespin, Pikachu, Pansage, or Pidgey/Pigeotto. Farfetch'd would also be great for a first Pokémon because it knew Aerial Ace - always hits - and it would be able to put a good dent in Vivillon before Harden roughs it up later. (See, we need something that has an advantage over Surskit, but not that opposite way around. Fire is out for your lead Poké.) After that, just continue going: you should have at least two or three Pokémon at Level 12+ that are able to deal with this bug problem.


After winning the battle, you'll get the Bug Badge! This first Badge of the Kalos region lets traded Pokémon up to Level 30 obey you. You'll also receive TM83, which teaches Infestation, preventing enemies from leaving the battle while taking Bug damage. Additionally, like in Black/White, TMs and HMs here get infinite uses instead of the one use from HeartGold/SoulSilver going back all of the way to Red/Green.

Anyhow, use the stairs behind Viola to get outside.



Cliff Badge



Sectional Flowchart



Yeah, this is going to be a long one. ;)




Leaving Santalune



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Exp. Share

Once you've finished up with the first of eight Gyms, heal up in the Pokémon Center and shop if needed. If you haven't visited the dead-end Route 22, now's a pretty good time if you're looking for extra levels. Anyhow, in the northwest corner of Santalune, you'll meet the elder sister of Viola, Alexa. She'll hand you an Exp. Share. 

About the Exp. Share and How to Use It

The Exp. Share is an immensely useful Key Item that divides the EXP. among ALL Pokémon in your party. (It's not a hold item like before: six Pokémon in a party means six Pokémon gain EXP.) This is very useful in leveling up weak Pokémon that you got from Route 2 or so; series veterans probably recall also using it on their Magikarp in the ol' days because he was useless until he hit Level 20 -- then watch out! =P

However, some people don't like to use it for whatever reason. Okay, whatever. In that case, consider the Pokémon you mainly use in battle: for me, that's my Braixen (evolved Fennekin). If you want to power them up more -- remember, if the Pokémon is traded and above Level 20, it won't obey! -- you can give a battle participant the EXP. Share. This boosts the EXP. said Pokémon earns in battle by ~50%! However, I've yet to do the math on this matter and am assuming that your Pokémon is alone.

Additionally, the Exp. Share divides up the Effort Values - see the Super Training: EVs Explained section for some more details - earned by Pokémon equally. This can help in more precise addition of EVs if you're looking for that, or just as a note that you don't really have to use the Pokémon at all if you don't to. I'm not sure how it would divide partial EVs, though. If the values are truncated, then you're really screwed since no Pokémon gives more than 3 EVs to one stat.

So, in short? If you want to level up weak Pokémon, take out most of your non-useful Pokémon now and put in one or two to power-level without battling. To the curious, my party now is Braixen, Pikachu, and Pidgey. If you do not want to use the Exp. Share, turn it off in the Key Items menu. Frankly, if you want preserve the challenge of the game, turn it off - if you're like me and plan on using your starter throughout the whole game, using the Exp. Share will bring them to Level 85+ by the Elite Four.


Phew! Anyhow, go north of where Alexa was onto Route 4.



Route 4



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Repel [_] Super Potion [_] Great Ball [_] Antidote [_] Poison Barb [_] Net Ball
[_] Ether [_] TM27 (Return)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Budew Grass/Poison Natural Cure, Poison Point, Leaf Guard 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Combee Bug/Flying Honey Gather, Hustle 1 Speed Both
Flabébé Fairy Flower Veil 1 Sp.Def. Both
Ledyba Bug/Flying Early Bird, Swarm, Rattled 1 Sp.Def. Both
Ralts Psychic/Fairy Synchronize, Trace, Telepathy 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Skitty Normal Cute Charm, Normalize, Wonder Skin 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Gardener Wheaton $640 Corphish Lv. 10
Roller Skater Roland $320 Pidgey Lv. 10
Roller Skater Calida $320 Fletchling Lv. 10
Poké Fan Agnes* $560 Burmy Lv. 7, Burmy Lv. 7, Burmy Lv. 7
Preschooler Adrian $144 Magikarp Lv. 9
Preschooler Mia $144 Budew Lv. 9
Gardener Grover $640 Corphish Lv. 9
Poké Fan Gabe $720 Pichu Lv. 7, Pikachu Lv. 9
Gardener Fabian $640 Corphish Lv. 10
NOTE (*): This trainer has all three Formes of Burmy, and it would seem to the uninitiated that their types differ from the Bug type. Be advised that, in Burmy, it is purely aesthetic. (Now, Wormadam, that's a different matter...)

^sr6|It seems to be a Route 4 beta.

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: The primary feature here is probably going to be Ralts. Psychic Pokémon are a rarity in most Pokémon games, and this one is no different - not to mention that this one has been altered to be part-Fairy! His and his evolutions' learnsets suck for the most part, being dominated by Normal and Psychic moves, but proper use of TMs and HMs can turn this cute li'l guy into a murderous machine. ... You know. Like Chuckie. If you're looking for Pokédex completion, be sure to grab a female Combee. Only female Combee evolve (into Vespiquen) at Level 21; males do nothing. (The gender ratio is not in your favor, either: 87.5% are male, and 12.5% are female, like your starter Poké's.)

Anyhow, as you enter the Route, you'll notice that there are a nice load of flowers around here. They function as grass, and normally the Pokémon are supposed to differ between them, although I haven't isolated much of anything in that regard yet. >_> Head into the patch to the west, then use the right northbound path to find a Repel, which prevents Pokémon battles for a number of steps. In the southeastern patch of flowers, use the right northbound path to eventually reach a Super Potion. Continue north past there to easily find a Great Ball. Then go south and through the flowers westward, then north into the northwest maze. Fight the Trainer on the west side and you can weave around to an Antidote.

Head into the flower patch northwest of there, then northeast and downstairs. Around the fountain, you can fight a Roller Skater, Roland. Another, Calida, is somewhere nearby. Skate (or run) around the fountain - take note of the Horsea and Clamperl on it, if you care - and continue north. If you use the east northbound path from the stairs, you'll battle a Poké Fan - perhaps one of the truer Poké Fans of the series, given his apparent love for the three Burmy Formes. Not much further to the north of there, you can battle a Presch-- oh, wow, what an epic trade! XD Poor fool; you can tell they don't have Pokémon RPGs in Kalos.

Head into the little set of flowers to the west (center of the Route) to find a Poison Barb; it boosts the power of Poison-type moves by ~20%, and is good for those who've gotten Beedrill already. Or you can save it for Bulbasaur. Whatever. Further west, you can find another Preschooler to battle, a rather sore loser at that. Go north and "navigate" through the northwestern hedge maze to find a Gardener. Just west of him, partly hidden by the grass, is a Net Ball: it has a x4.0 catch rate on Bug- and Water-type Pokémon. (And, no, Surskit doesn't make it x8.0 or x16.0. Darn.)

Go south through the flowers and east onto the main route again. Go north and east, then battle Gabe in the flower patch from before. (He's on the north side; we were on the south.) This guy has 2/3 of the Pichu evolutionary chain; sad that he also doesn't have the Spiky-Eared Pichu. Go southeast from there and into the northeastern of these a-maze-ing hedge mazes, then north to battle a Gardener. (Note that, if he blocks the path northward, you have to go back south and through the eastern flower patch to get what's at the end - a 10-PP-healing Ether!)

Return onto the main route and go north of where you fought Gabe to encounter two Trainers. They'll take on about Flabébé and it being a Fairy-type. (Hey ... so is Ralts. ;_;) They jabber on about how they got a Pokédex a few years ago and opt to show you to Sycamore. Okay, then. Follow 'em. As you prepare to exit the gatehouse, you'll earn TM27, which teaches Return. Return is a Normal-type move of an undefined power stat: the Happier your Pokémon, the more powerful it is. It will therefore probably be strongest on your starter Pokémon as walking around does raise Happiness, slowly.

Head into Lumiose.




Lumiose City: Kanto Starters!?


MAJOR GAME-BREAKING GLITCH NOTE: PLEASE READ!

It has been reported, in multiple releases of Pokémon X and Y, that there is a game-breaking glitch in Lumiose City, particularly regarding saving. Reports indicate that saving in the outside areas (i.e. not buildings) and later reloading these files may cause your game to glitch up. Some are mild and fixable under the proper circumstances - for example, some people have gotten stuck in people and solved it by simply Flying/Teleporting elsewhere. Other times, the game literally hangs before you can input commands, forcing you to delete your save file by hand and begin anew. There are no reports of problems when saving inside buildings (such as the Pokémon Center) and no problems known to occur by saving outside of Lumiose City (i.e. Route 4).

There is a patch to this glitch currently available, for free, on the Nintendo eShop - once downloaded, it will fix the glitch. (Note that there are patches individually made for Pokémon X and Pokémon Y - download the one for *your* game.) If you are currently experiencing certain effects from the glitch - such as being stuck in something - this will be corrected. The patch takes approximately 227 blocks to download. If you have no internet/Wi-Fi connection with which to download this, then, do not save outside of a building in Lumiose City - otherwise, you will be fine.


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TinyMushrooms [_] Venusaurite/Charizardite/Blastoisite [_] TM54 (False Swipe)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability Notes
Both [none] Bulbasaur Grass/Poison Overgrow You only get one!
Both [none] Charmander Fire Blaze
Both [none] Squirtle Water Torrent

LUMIOSE CITY POKÉMART - GENERAL STORE
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.

LUMIOSE CITY POKÉMART - TMs
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Bulldoze (TM78) $10,000 Ground Physical 20 60 100 All Lowers Speed
Rain Dance (TM18) $50,000 Water Status 20 - - Field Makes it Rainy (5 turns)
Struggle Bug (TM76) $10,000 Bug Special 20 50 100 One Lowers Sp.Atk.
Sunny Day (TM11) $50,000 Fire Status 5 - - Field Makes it Sunny (5 turns)
Swords Dance (TM75) $10,000 Normal Status 20 - - User Raises Attack

LUMIOSE CITY - POKÉ MILEAGE EXCHANGE (POKÉMON CENTER)
Item Name Cost Effect
Berry Juice 10 mi. Heals 20 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Moomoo Milk 20 mi. Heals 100 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Full Heal 30 mi. Heals all non-stat-affecting ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Max Repel 35 mi. Prevents most random encounters for 250 steps.
Hyper Potion 60 mi. Heals 200 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Ultra Ball 60 mi. Captures Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.
Ether 120 mi. Restores 10 PP to one move on one Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Max Potion 125 mi. Refills a Pokémon's HP in the field or in battle completely.
Full Restore 300 mi. Fully restores HP and status ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Max Revive 400 mi. Revive a Pokémon from KO with full HP (not ~50% like usual).
Rare Candy 500 mi. The Pokémon levels up! (Won't work if at Level 100.)
PP Up 1,000 mi. Boosts one move's maximum PP by 20% of its usual base value.

As you arrive, you'll find yourself enter the largest city in all of Kalos: Lumiose. Go north and the Trainers from before will come along and Professor Sycamore's lab will be pointed out. We'll ignore this for now and explore a little.

If you go forward some, you'll see a building on the left. Go across the street into the other one (the first has nothing) if you want a little info on the StreetPass stuff: PokéMiles and the like. Continue up the street and past the intersection to find, on the left, the PR Video Center past Sycamore's place. Basically, you use the Nintendo 3DS internal camera for 10 seconds as a personal video. Across the street from there is the Pokémon Center. Within, other than healing and shopping, you can exchange Poké Miles, found as you travel in Kalos and as you StreetPass others. You can also now buy TMs - items that teach moves to Pokémon and (the items) never go away!


Weather

As a result of this, you will probably begin to see Pokémon using moves that affect the weather more and more. There are several types of weather: Hailing (caused by Hail or Snow Warning), Raining (caused by Rain Dance or Drizzle), Sunny (caused by Sunny Day or Drought), and Sandstorm (caused by Sandstorm or Sand Stream). Note that each type of weather can be brought on by the named move or ability, and they last 5 turns (7 with certain items) - yeah, abilities no longer provide an unlimited weather effect, so abuse it while you can! You can also have certain areas bring about weather permanently. Each type of weather has certain notable effects beyond triggering certain other abilities (like Solar Power and Chlorophyll):


  • Hailing: All non-Ice Pokémon are damaged each turn for 1/16 of their HP. Blizzard, normally 70% accurate, never misses. Ice-type moves are presumably also more powerful, but I've no evidence to support this. Castform will also adopt an Ice-type Forme as will its Weather Ball move.

  • Raining: Water-type moves are more powerful while Fire is weakened, and the Electric-type move Thunder (normally 70% accurate) never misses. Castform will also adopt a Water-type Forme like its Weather Ball move.

  • Sunny: Fire-type moves become powerful and Water is weakened. The move SolarBeam will require no charge-up turn, and I believe Fire Blast (normally 80% accurate) will never miss. Castform will adopt a Fire-type Forme as will its Weather Ball, and Cherrim adopts a more flowery Forme.

  • Sandstorm: All Pokémon not of the Rock, Ground, or Steel types lose 1/16 of their HP with each turn. That's all I really know about this.


You can't go any further because of the blackout. If you go east of the city entrance, you will see a star-emblazoned building on the left, the Restaurant Le Nah, where you can dine. ("Dine" is code for "battling three Double Battles". Battle if desired.) You'll get TinyMushrooms for working it all out.

That finishes it for now. Head back towards the Pokémon Center and into Sycamore's place. Use the elevator to reach 3F. Once there, you'll finally meet Professor Sycamore. Head south and west after him. He'll check your Pokédex. During his following speech. Shauna arrives with Serena/Calem. Speak with Sycamore to confirm that wish to begin!


BOSS: Professor Sycamore

  • Rewards: $1,400, another Starter!

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Bulbasaur Grass/Poison Level 10 N/A
Charmander Fire Level 10 N/A
Squirtle Water Level 10 N/A

  • Bulbasaur: The only dual-type Starter Pokémon in history, from Red/Green on, Bulbasaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic. It knows Leech Seed, a Grass-type move that drains your HP. Quickly kill it to avoid this!

  • Charmander: The fiery salamander, Charmander is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground. Ember is pretty damaging - 300% normal damage - versus Grass, Bug, Steel, and Ice types. Still, it's not too hard.

  • Squirtle: The aquatic turtle, Squirtle is weak to Grass and Electric, and is advantageous over Rock, Ground, and Fire through Water Gun. It can power up Water Gun with Water Sport - but that'll also hurt Charmander is he's third! >:)

Strategically, this battle is pretty easy if you've been raising a variety of Pokémon. Your starter should be able to take out one of them with little difficulty: Fennekin for Bulbasaur, Froakie for Charmander, and Chespin for Squirtle. Pidgeotto or Fletchinder have a good chance against Bulbasaur, as would Pansear. Pansage or Pikachu are good to get rid of Squirtle, and Panpour is about the only Pokémon built strictly to defeat Charmander. For Charmander, just send out your strongest, I suppose.


^sr7|

After the battle, Sycamore decides you deserve another starter Pokémon for your performance. Darn right we do - now, let's pick one of the three (official) Kanto starter Pokémon. But who?


  • Bulbasaur: (NOTE: While the game claims him to be a Grass-type in the choosing sequence pictured to the right, he is both Grass and Poison!) Pictured on the left, you'll find Bulbasaur. He evolves at Level 16 and again at Level 36, retaining the same typing, and has a Mega-Evolution. Bulbasaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic, and advantageous over Rock, Water, Ground, and Grass. Ideally, Bulbasaur is good to pair with Fennekin, or even Braixen better, because they cover a lot of weaknesses the other has.

  • Charmander: The middle of the three, Charmander evolves at Level 16 and Level 36. This latter evolution, to Charizard, is of the Flying/Fire type. Charmander normally is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, with Charizard bringing in concerns of quadruple-damage Rock (except in his Pokémon X Mega-Evolution) and Electric. He is advantageous over Grass, Bug, Ice, and Steel, with Flying adding in Fighting later on. Perhaps the strongest of the three starters by game end, he would be ideal to pair with Chespin. If you need one for Froakie, this would probably be best.

  • Squirtle: Obviously the more defensive of the three, Squirtle is only weak to Grass and Electric while being advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground. Like his two Kanto cousins, he evolves at Level 16 and Level 36 - with no type changes - and has a Mega-Evolution. ... To be honest, Squirtle doesn't pair off on the highest level with any of the Kalos starters. With Fennekin, Bulbasaur's superior; Charmander has Chespin; and Froakie would be repetition.

To the curious, I paired my Braixen with Bulbasaur. Ah, nostalgia. If you have a full party, you will need to send a Pokémon to the PC. You will also get a Mega Stone accompanying your starter: Venusaurite for Bulbasaur, Charizardite for Charmander (specifically X to Pokémon X players, and Charizardite Y for Pokémon Y players), and Blastoisite (?) for Squirtle. Mega Stones allow for Mega-Evolutions ... to be discussed later. ;) Anyways, Shauna and Serena/Calem will choose other Pokémon, while Sycamore suggests a new--

Wait a minute. Since he is giving us the Pokémon he used, while he was the owner, shouldn't they be counted as trades by the game, and therefore give us 50% more EXP.? >_<

Anyways, Sycamore suggests going to Camphrier Town to learn more of Mega-Evolution. As you leave, speak with the scientist in the northeast corner of the room. If you have enough Pokémon in the Central Kalos Pokédex - I had 39, so the minimum's probably 30 - you get TM54. ^_^ TM54 teaches False Swipe, a Normal-type move of 40 Power that cannot KO a Pokémon, which makes it EXTREMELY useful in capturing Pokémon. Be sure to hang on to it! (It's not like you can get rid of it anyways. =P)




Lumiose City: Exploration


MAJOR GAME-BREAKING GLITCH NOTE: PLEASE READ!

It has been reported, in multiple releases of Pokémon X and Y, that there is a game-breaking glitch in Lumiose City, particularly regarding saving. Reports indicate that saving in the outside areas (i.e. not buildings) and later reloading these files may cause your game to glitch up. Some are mild and fixable under the proper circumstances - for example, some people have gotten stuck in people and solved it by simply Flying/Teleporting elsewhere. Other times, the game literally hangs before you can input commands, forcing you to delete your save file by hand and begin anew. There are no reports of problems when saving inside buildings (such as the Pokémon Center) and no problems known to occur by saving outside of Lumiose City (i.e. Route 4).

There is a patch to this glitch currently available, for free, on the Nintendo eShop - once downloaded, it will fix the glitch. (Note that there are patches individually made for Pokémon X and Pokémon Y - download the one for *your* game.) If you are currently experiencing certain effects from the glitch - such as being stuck in something - this will be corrected. The patch takes approximately 227 blocks to download. If you have no internet/Wi-Fi connection with which to download this, then, do not save outside of a building in Lumiose City - otherwise, you will be fine.


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Luxury Ball x5 [_] Quick Claw [_] Timer Ball x3 [_] Quick Ball x3

LUMIOSE CITY - STONE EMPORIUM
Item Name Cost Effect
Kanto Starter Mega Stone $1,000,000 Made for the Kanto starter stronger to yours; lets it Mega Evolve.
Fire Stone $2,100 Evolves Vulpix, Growlithe, Eevee, and Pansear.
Leaf Stone $2,100 Evolves Gloom, Weepinbell, Exeggcute, Nuzleaf, and Pansage.
Water Stone $2,100 Evolves Poliwhirl, Shellder, Staryu, Eevee, Lombre, and Panpour.

LUMIOSE CITY - HERBORISTE
Item Name Cost Effect
Energy Powder $500 Heals 50 HP to a Pokémon. Also lowers their Happiness.
Energy Root $800 Heals 200 HP to a Pokémon. Greatly lowers their Happiness.
Heal Powder $450 Heals all ailments (except KO and Pokérus). Lowers Happiness.
Revival Herb $2,800 Revives from KO with full HP. Greatly lowers the target's Happiness.

If you need the other shops, see the previous sub-section: this is just a logical extension of it.

As you go outside from Sycamore's, go to 2F. speak with the woman near the neon-blue chamber to get five Luxury Balls! While they don't affect catch rate, they make Pokémon Happier faster, which is great for the numerous Pokémon that can learn Return! Head down to 1F and you'll meet Lysandre. You'll see more of him later. Trust me. Approach the entrance and everyone will leave before you do. Doormat. >_>

As you exit, it seems the power's back on. Heal at the Pokémon Center if needed, then go down the street further along from it. There is a black-and-white building past the intersection you can use to change your hairstyle and color - kinda pointless, but that's just me since it costs $3,000 for both. (Damn, that's one expensive haircut!) Next door is the café Serena/Calem wanted you to enter. There, you'll see Lysandre (told ya) and Diantha (you'll also see more of her later). Okaaay, awwwwwkward coversation aside, Serena/Calem effectively declares herself/himself your rival.

Enter the building across the street and speak with the woman sitting to the west for a Quick Claw - it sometimes lets your Pokémon move first if it normally doesn't. Use the elevator to go up to 2F. Speak with the eastern dudes in the cubicle to get three Quick Balls (x4.0 catch rate in the first four turns of battle) and three Timer Balls (+1 to catch rate with each 10 turns of battle, up to x4.0). That's about it for now.

Go back to the Pokémon Center and down the street next to it. On the left side of the street, you can buy some evolutionary stones, if you want. The Water Stone is the most versatile if you don't have any, or you can always buy one to help out the simian I recommended you catch earlier. Strangely, no Gen. VI Pokémon seem to evolve by (these) stones. The shop next door sells Herbs - while powerful and useful healing items, even to the point of full revival from HP, they make your Pokémon hate you. Use them sparingly unless you're grinding for Frustration - and, even then, be sure your Pokémon doesn't evolve through Happiness or you'll be screwed for a while to come.

The next two buildings down the street from there are salons for Furfrou (which you don't have). The power is also out beyond here, so there's not much else to do here in Lumiose. So, remember where the Pokémon Center is? Heal up there, then go clockwise around to where Trevor was. Go on out to Route 5. As you do so, you'll get a Holo Clip from Tierno that's rather pointless.




Route 5


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Attack O-Power [_] Defense O-Power [_] Super Potion [_] Great Ball [_] Honey x3 [_] Super Potion
[_] Oran Berry [_] X Attack [_] TM01 (Hone Claws)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Abra Psychic Inner Focus, Synchronize, Magic Guard 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Doduo Normal/Flying Early Bird, Run Away, Tangled Feet 1 Attack Both
Furfrou Normal Fur Coat 1 Sp.Def. Both
Gulpin Poison Liquid Ooze, Sticky Hold, Gluttony 1 HP Both
Minun Electric Volt Absorb, Minus 1 Speed Y
Pancham Fighting Iron Fist, Mold Breaker 1 Attack Both
Plusle Electric Volt Absorb, Plus 1 Speed X
Skiddo Grass Sap Sipper 1 HP Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Gulpin Poison Liquid Ooze, Sticky Hold, Gluttony 1 HP Both
Minun Electric Volt Absorb, Minus 1 Speed Y
Plusle Electric Volt Absorb, Plus 1 Speed X
Scraggy Dark/Fighting Moxie, Shed Skin, Intimidate 1 Attack Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Twins Faith & Joy $640 Plusle Lv. 10, Minun Lv. 10
Pokémon Trainer Tierno $1,200 Corphish Lv. 12
Rising Star Hamish $780 Kadabra Lv. 13
Roller Skater Winnie $352 Bunnelby Lv. 9, Skiddo Lv. 11
Roller Skater Florin $384 Doduo Lv. 12
Rising Star Tyson $600 Bidoof Lv. 12, Oddish Lv. 10
Backpacker Heike $480 Sentret Lv. 12
Youngster Keita $288 Pansage Lv. 12

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: As far as Electric-types go, Plusle and Minun are useful in a debateable way. Their Minus/Plus abilities work nicely if in a Double Battle, but otherwise are not good, especially in Single Battles. Scrappy - I mean Scraggy makes a nice Fighting type to have due to the Psychic immunity, although Fighting is now a weakness. He has a nice variety of moves once you get a sufficient amount of TMs, though. However, Abra is by far the main feature of the Route. While being a real douche when it comes to catching - almost always using Teleport to end battle as his first move - you can build him up to an absolute beast by the time you get him to Kadabra/Alakazam, simply due to sheer move variety (and like 135 in the Sp. Atk. base stat) - disregarding that Alakazam can also Mega Evolve. I recommend using a Quick Ball whenever you see him: the Quick Ball has a quadruple catch rate - double that of an Ultra Ball! - whenever used on the first four turns, which you pretty much have to do. See the previous sub-section for how to get three free ones!

^sr8|

HORDE BATTLES: A new aspect to the Pokémon series, Horde Battles are quite literally the hardest ones in the game if you're not prepared. Typically initiated by using the Honey item where wild Pokémon can be found (although they can be found 1% ~ 5% of the time at random), these battles are one-versus-five -- you being the one! Luckily, these Pokémon can often be underleveled to compensate, as the nearby screenshot shows - the ones on Route 5 may not even get above Level 5. However, even five weak attacks - especially ones that are abusing type advantages - will wear on even the strongest Pokémon. You will want to use multitarget moves for this - moves like Surf and Earthquake, for example, hit all Pokémon. You are able to catch Pokémon in Horde Battles - however, you need to get it narrowed down to one Pokémon without KO'ing it.

As you go through the gatehouse, Mr. Bonding will give you the Attack O-Power and Defense O-Power, just b'cause. They're O-Powers that increase the named stats for a while. Well, get onto the Route.

As you enter, a Lucario will start circling you. Do ... not ... move. Just joking, but still... Its owner, a rollerblader, will come by. Say what you will about the Lucario liking you. The Trainer will introduce herself as Korrina, the Gym Leader in Shalour, before leaving. In the nearby skate park, go due north whilst roller skating to get on the rail. (You may need to screw around a little.) You'll be able to grab a Super Potion for doing so. Return to the entrance and head west along the main Route - there's some grass to the south if you wanna battle. Or capture. Or make cud. Whatever floats your boat.

After going upstairs, you'll deal with your first 2-on-2 Double Battle! Yay~! From there, go south, then east and south along the grassy path to find a Great Ball. Head on back north and west, continue west and up the stairs. You'll meet Trevor and Tierno, the latter of whom will challenge you to a battle. (It's easy: just use a Grass- or Electric-type.) After, Trevor will hand over three Honeys, which can be used to attract often-more-rare Pokémon (Diamond/Pearl players remember this). If you're a brave soul, you can use it to initiate Horde Battles, described earlier.

Past the grass patch to the northwest, you'll fight Rising Star Hamish. Go north of there and approach the rail from the west to slide down it on your skates to a Super Potion. Return to Hamish and ascend the hill to the west. Go south at the top, and bypass the stairs. Use the skates to grind down another rail to find a blue Oran Berry. The Oran Berry is a hold item that will heal 10 HP when the Pokémon reaches around 50% HP. Go east and hop over the ledge, then head north, through the grass, up the hill, and south, this time opting for the staircase. *huff puff*

After you reach the top of the stairs, go southwest and through the purple flowers to find an X Attack. Go back northeast and north to defeat some Roller Skaters. Grind across the nearby rail if you want, but it only works partway if you don't go fast. In the flower patch, go southwest and up the stairs you find. At the top, go southwest and grind across that rail - again, go fast or be screwed. On the other side is a yellow Pokéball containing TM01 - this teaches Hone Claws, powering up physical moves.

Hop over the ledge to the south and beat the Rising Star just to the east. Then go west and downstairs to battle the Backpacker. In the grass to the southwest, you can battle one more Trainer, a Youngster. From there, just continue south and west into Camphrier Town.




Camphrier Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Ultra Ball [_] Full Heal [_] Sp. Atk. O-Power Lv. 1 [_] TM46 (Thief) [_] Berry Juice [_] Sweet Heart
[_] X Attack [_] Star Piece [_] Escape Rope

CAMPHRIER TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.

As you enter town, you'll get a message from Lysandre Labs about the Holo Caster. Meh. Anyhow, go south and into the Pokémon Center (whose interior definitely contrasts with the rural feel of the town outside). Feel free to deal with the Name Rater inside, like it matters. >_> He can change the nicknames of Pokémon you own. Just outside, to the west, some guy will give you an Ultra Ball, a Pokéball whose catch rate is x2.0 - double that of a normal Poké Ball, and 67% greater than a Great Ball!

Go west and into the southwestern building, then speak with the dude to the west for a Full Heal. Head upstairs and into the southeastern of the rooms to find Mr. Bonding. Speak with him and you can get Sp. Atk. O-Power Lv. 1. North of the Pokémon Center, you can find a dude named Cassius in his house, running the Kalos PC's on Bill's behalf. You can also get called a thief by one of the girls around here - nah, it's a pun. (She tells you to take TM46, which is Thief.) ... These people seriously have some serious problems with the word "seriously". -_-

In the main town, go west and speak with the dude in front of the next unvisited house for some Berry Juice - normally an item you can only find in FireRed/LeafGreen, it's slowly becoming more proliferated throughout the later generations. Still, it's only makeable in those games, and items cannot be transfered to Black/White. >_< Berry Juice heals 20 HP, like a Potion. In the house itself, you can speak with a dude requesting to see a certain Pokémon type - show him one for a random Berry. The other woman in the house gives you a Sweet Heart, which, like Berry Juice, heals 20 HP. Ah, they're so generous, yet so ... crap, I suppose is the word I'm looking for. Leave the house and go southwest to find an X Attack.

If you go south of the town, you can find a Star Piece, an item you can sell for a lot of money. North of the town is Shabboneau Castle, in which you'll find Shauna. As we try to figure out what Mega-Evolution is, "it" is back again, and on Route 7. For now, go west, north, and upstairs. To the south, you can find an Escape Rope. That's it. Leave the castle, then leave the town heading west.




Route 6


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Oran Berry x5 [_] Pecha Berry x5 [_] Sprinklotad [_] Miracle Seed [_] Heal Ball [_] X Sp. Atk.

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Audino (Shaking Grass) Normal Healer, Regenerator, Klutz 2 HP Both
Venipede (Shaking Grass) Bug/Poison Poison Point, Swarm, Quick Feet 1 Defense Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Tourist Hiroko $880 Pikachu Lv. 11, Pidgey Lv. 11, Psyduck Lv. 11
Tourist Eriko $880 Zigzagoon Lv. 11, Ralts Lv. 11, Gulpin Lv. 11

Trust me, I'll explain momentarily. Or you'll find out. We'll see.

Go due west for a bit and you'll see a path off to the south. There, a man will make you tend his Berry fields. Basically, it's like Berry growing in Pokémon Diamond/Pearl - plant a Berry (you'll get 5 Oran Berries and 5 Pecha Berries during the tutorial), water it (this gets you the Sprinklotad - creative...), and wait. You can also use Mulch, and close-together trees can cross-pollinate for new ones. In all, there are 36 plots of land for growth here.

It's a bit more high-maintenance now. You also have to check regularly to get rid of weeds, sometimes get rid of (battle) the Bug Pokémon that come, and pick Berries before the trees withers. Mulch is made in the northwest corner of the fields - put three Berries in for much mulchy Mulch. Be sure to plant a good number of Berries - enough (I had five before I noticed, I think) will get you a Miracle Seed in the southwest corner. The Miracle Seed is a hold item that boosts the power of Grass-type moves by about 20%. If you want more details, see the Berry Harvesting section.

Back on the main Route, go west some more. Eventually, you'll find an all-too-inconvenient roadblock. As usual, it is caused by a Snorlax falling asleep on a bridge not too big and not too small. (And not too weak - what the heck is that thing made of!?) Apparently, no one wishes to kill it, no one has a forklift, no one has TNT, no one grasps the concept of climbing over it, and no one knows how to swim or teach Pokémon Surf. So, despite all the more tasteful alternatives, we have to go get a Poké Flute, found in Parfum Palace - on Route 6. First, though, go north along the shoreline to find a Heal Ball - these heal Pokémon completely upon their capture. HOWEVER, Heal Balls are useless if your party is full: Pokémon are fully healed upon going to the PC anyways, and their catch rate is no different from a Poké Ball or a Premier Ball.

So, anyhow, go back east and along the branch of the path to the official Route 6. Just zoom north for a while, battling some Trainers as you go. As you enter, though, be sure to go west for the X Sp. Atk.




Parfum Palace


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Ether [_] Oran Berry [_] Amulet Coin [_] Antidote [_] HM01 (Cut) [_] Super Potion
[_] Poké Flute [_] TM17 (Protect)

^sr9|

Head along the dirt path and you'll soon run into someone; speak with them to receive an Oran Berry. If you look carefully, you can see a Pokéball lying on the ground to the northwest: it contains the ever-useful Ether. Far to the southeast, you can examine the signboard and call Phil the Photo Guy. Basically, you get to take a photo/screenshot of some of the area. That's gonna help me give some color to this FAQ, for you can store them on your SD Card! ^_^ It's like operating the normal 3DS camera for the most part, even the whole moving around thing.

Anyways, hammer time. Approach the gates and you'll have to pay $1,000 to enter - Shauna pays her own way in, doing something useful for once. Continue on in. Ah, cool, a golden Milotic (statue, I hope not - *shuffles around, looking for a Poké Ball*). The dude near it seems to have lost his Furfrou, and somehow makes it our problem. Anyways, go north and into the second room from the left. You can nap on the bed for a full healing of your Pokémon. >_> <_<

Use the leftmost staircase to go up a floor, then enter the first room to the right. There, you'll be able to grab an Amulet Coin: if the holder battles against a Trainer, then your money earned doubles! If you go east from the hall, you'll find another where you can go to the right and outside. In the courtyard, Black/White players will take keen notice of the Reshiram and Zekrom statues in addition to the Dratini/Dragonair ones along the edges of the viewable area. So cool!

Return to the first floor and go through the north-central grand door. Cross the large bridge and Shauna will decide, all of a sudden, to do something. Go northeast to the hedges where you are forced into a top-down viewpoint. (C'mon, I thought we stopped this two generations and six years ago...) Go north along them to an Antidote, then return to the bridge. Go west and north into the maze, then take the northeast path of the five to HM01, which you'll need to do stuff later on. In the northwest corner of the maze, also, you'll find a Super Potion.

If you go north of here into another maze area, you can find Furfrou. There are four clearings you need to place Shauna and yourself in - just speak with her to put her somewhere. With the Furfrou in the west clearing (you can move it there by running around if need be), put her at the start first. Then you go north and west to the west clearing. Next, put Shauna in the east clearing. You go to the west clearing, then north and east.

Once done, head on back to the balcony where you could see the Reshiram and Zekrom statues. Weirdness aside -- I do wonder how that scene would play out if you played as a girl? I was a guy -- you get the Poké Flute. And, uh, erm, not a moment too soon - saved by the bell. Or the flute, as it were. (And it just gets worse in my sleep-deprived head as we get into some good ol' classism.) You also get TM17 - it teaches Protect, which can stop moves from affecting you for one turn, but is likely to fail if used repeatedly.

Anyways, return to the palace entrance and use the eastern exit of the two southbound ones to get to an optional area of Route 6.




Route 6 - Unkempt Zone



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Antidote [_] X Speed [_] Paralyze Heal [_] TinyMushroom [_] TM09 (Venoshock) [_] Super Repel
[_] Awakening [_] Aguav Berry [_] Ultra Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Audino (Shaking Grass) Normal Healer, Regenerator, Klutz 2 HP Both
Espurr Psychic Keen Eye, Infiltrator, Own Tempo 1 Speed Both
Honedge Steel/Ghost No Guard 1 Defense Both
Kecleon Normal Color Change, Protean 1 Sp.Def. Both
Nincada Bug/Ground Compoundeyes, Run Away 1 Defense Both
Oddish Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Run Away 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Sentret Normal Keen Eye, Run Away, Frisk 1 Attack Both
Venipede (Shaking Grass) Bug/Poison Poison Point, Swarm, Quick Feet 1 Defense Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Backpacker Jerome $560 Fletchling Lv. 14
Tourist Takemi $1,008 Volbeat Lv. 14
Tourist Mari $1,008 Illumise Lv. 14
Youngster Jacob $312 Croagunk Lv. 11, Beedrill Lv. 13
Poké Fans Jan & Erin $2,240 Furfrou Lv. 14, Furfrou Lv. 14
Beauty Brigitte $960 Espurr Lv. 12, Butterfree Lv. 12
Youngster Tyler $288 Venipede Lv. 12, Scraggy Lv. 12
Backpacker Rodgerik $560 Bunnelby Lv. 14

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Strategists will have a field day here: most of these Pokémon tend to rely on type advantages and abilities over brute strength to dominate the competition. Nincada is himself not one. However, if you level it up to Level 20 - with a blank spot in the party and a Poké Ball in your pocket - you can get both Ninjask (one of the fastest Pokémon) and Shedinja. The latter has only 1 HP, but can only be hit by Fire-, Rock-, Flying-, Ghost-, and Dark-type moves, none of which are exceedingly common and unavoidable! ^_^ There is also Honedge, who is immune to Fighting, Normal, and Poison, and retains many resistances that Steel typically has. Kecleon also has Color Change, which means it will become the type of the move it was hit with - unless Pokémon have a variety of moves (or just Ghost or just Dragon), you will likely give the opposition trouble since such instances are rare. And, finally, Audino is good for EXP. grinding.

As you go south onto the route, you'll see something yellow poking up out of the grass. Approach and examine it to find it is a Backpacker. Go southeast to find a more-visible Antidote, then west and south for an X Speed. Return to the beaten path and follow it southward to find a Tourist, then another, each having one of the version-near-exclusive fireflies from Ruby/Sapphire. South of the second, you can sorta see a dirt path going east. Follow it, then cut across the grass to an item (Paralyze Heal). If you go north from there, there will be a path narrowing off to the north: press A at the end for a TinyMushroom.

Go south along the dirt path to find a Youngster to beat, then backtrack to the Volbeat/Illumise Tourists. Go south and west and north to the yellow Pokéball hiding TM09, Venoshock, which does additional damage if the target is Poisoned. (Think if you have Ivysaur like me - PoisonPowder, Venoshock, pwnage.)

That's it. Hop over the ledge. Now, for the other side, return to Parfum Palace, go west, and use THAT path.

Beat the Poké Fans to the south. Go further south to Brigitte, then head west. Get onto the ledge near the grass to find a Super Repel - pretty useful if you're encountering the dozens I am. >_> Poor Braixen, hitting Level 26 before the second Gym. Go east to the next small clearing for an Awakening, then go southwest to the Aguav Berry tree. Go south and beat up the Youngster, then return to the beaten path and go south. At the next intersection, go west to find a Backpacker, then go southwestern clearing an Ultra Ball. Go back far east and over the ledge to leave. Return to Route 7 to the south.




Route 7 - In Full



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] X Sp. Def. [_] PP Up [_] Persim Berry [_] TinyMushroom [_] Silver Powder

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Croagunk Poison/Fighting Anticipation, Dry Skin, Poison Touch 1 Attack Both
Ducklett Water/Flying Big Pecks, Keen Eye, Hydration 1 HP Both
Flabébé Fairy Flower Veil 1 Sp.Def. Both
Illumise Bug Oblivious, Tinted Lens, Prankster 1 Speed Both
Roselia Grass/Poison Natural Cure, Poison Point, Leaf Guard 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Smeargle Normal Own Tempo, Technician, Moody 1 Speed Both
Spritzee Fairy Healer 1 HP Y
Swirlix Fairy Sweet Veil 1 Defense X
Volbeat Bug Illuminate, Swarm, Prankster 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Budew Grass/Poison Natural Cure, Poison Point, Leaf Guard 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Hoppip Grass/Flying Chlorophyll, Leaf Guard, Infiltrator 1 Sp.Def. Both
Psyduck Water Cloud Nine, Damp, Swift Swim 1 Sp.Atk. Both
SPECIAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Snorlax Normal Immunity, Thick Fat, Gluttony 2 HP Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Artist Georgia $896 Smeargle Lv. 16
Artist Family Mona & Paolo $1,792 Smeargle Lv. 16, Smeargle Lv. 16
Artist Pierre $896 Smeargle Lv. 16

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Snorlax is a given to get, especially for those who love tanks. Smeragle is pretty good, too, if you can get him used right. See, the main move he knows is Sketch, which copies the target's moveset. Normally, that seems like it's just a field day for half-effective attacks ... but what if you're against a Ghost or Dragon (or a Ghost and Dragon like Giratina? lol)? Ghost does double to Ghost, and Dragon double to Dragon... Nothing else really impressive is on this Route.

^sr10|Zzz...

As you return to Route 7, head back into Camphrier if you need to heal or shop: if you don't have many good (i.e. Quick/Timer) Pokéballs, you may as well try for a Great Ball. Why? Well, head west on the main Route to come across the gluttonous Snorlax. Hand over the Poké Flute, after being warned of the potential of a violent reaction, you'll listen to the Flute be played. (Oh, man, nostalgia...)


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #143 Snorlax--=
  • EV Yield: 2 HP
  • Hold Item: Sitrus Berry

Level Level 15 Move 1 Tackle (Normal)
Type Normal Move 2 Defense Curl (Defense up)
Gender Ratio 50% - 50% Move 3 Amnesia (Sp.Def. up)
Abilities Immunity, Thick Fat Move 4 Lick (Ghost)

  • Snorlax: Snorlax is weak to Fighting, and immune to Ghost. Its moves allow it to deal extra damage to Ghost, Psychic, and Fairy Pokémon through Lick, which can also confuse. Other than that, its base 160 HP and base 110 Defense probably make this guy a tank against your starter. Look for it to abuse its (Special) Defense-boosting moves a LOT early on.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - there is a mulligan if you screw up on this 'un, but he's nice to catch anyways. False Swipe, a move learnable through a TM you should've gotten back in Lumiose City, is highly ideal for this battle: it won't kill the Pokémon, allowing you to optimize it. You can also use Stun Spore or Thunder Wave or abuse the Static ability to Paralyze the guy and raise the catch rate further.

Alternatively, you can lower his HP some in the first three turns and use a Quick Ball on the fourth for the quadruple catch rate. Then again, you could wait 40 turns and toss a Timer Ball for that quadruple rate.


After the battle, you hear the bridge creak with relief at the lack of strain. lol The dude from the Parfum Palace arrives, chats it up, and leaves without the Flute. As you head west on the other side of the bridge, you'll find the Pokémon Day Care. There, you can leave Pokémon for a fee of ($100 + (100 * levels gained)). EXP. for these Pokémon is earned at a rate of 1 EXP. per 1 step you take. You can also get Pokémon to breed if left there long enough and being of opposite genders. Here's the gnitty-gritty of it all:

POKÉMON BREEDING

  • You can leave up to two Pokémon (or just one, if you want) at the daycare. Leaving one doesn't boost the growth of it versus having two.

  • Pokémon are returned at a cost of $100, plus $100 more per level gained.

  • Pokémon gain 1 EXP. for every step you take while they remain here.

  • If a Pokémon levels up here, the top move of its moveset is replaced with any new moves it learns, and the new move goes to down to the bottom of the listing. You'll have to relearn the old move if you still want it. Beware of this!



Once you're done, outside, you'll find the Daycare Man just to the west. Speak with him when you want to see if your Pokémon have had an Egg no one felt like frying. There are some flowers to the south you can battle in, too. As you continue west, you can battle an Artist, using Smeargle per the stereotype. (You might want to look out for him: his Sketch copies your whole moveset, and it's the only move he likely knows.) Further west, you can compare Pokédexes with Trevor, who's in the flowers. (I won with 66.) Just a little to the southwest, you can find an X Sp. Def.

Continue west from Trevor to battle two Artists (and two Smeragles) at once. Further west is the Battle Chateau. Feel free to spend time there, but I won't really cover it here for now. Continue west and beat the remaining Artist on the Route. Continue along to meet your rival, then with Tierno and Trevor. Your rival suddenly suggests a Double Battle. *shrug* Okay!


BOSS: Pokémon Trainers Trevor & Tierno

  • Rewards: $3,000

OPPONENTS' POKÉMON PARTY
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Corphish Water Level 16 N/A
Flabébé Fairy Level 14 N/A
Pikachu Electric Level 14 N/A

ALLY'S (SERENA'S/CALEM'S) POKÉMON PARTY
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Fletchling Normal/Flying Level 14 N/A
Braixen Fire Level 16 Your Kalos starter was Chespin
Frogadier Water Level 16 Your Kalos starter was Fennekin
Quilladan Grass Level 16 Your Kalos starter was Froakie

  • Corphish: The easiest of the group, he is weak to Grass and Electric, and has no notable moves that I saw. I would assume a Water-type move is there, though.

  • Pikachu: This Pokémon is weak to just Ground, a type you probably don't have yet. Its Thundershock will rip through most Water- and Flying-type Pokémon pretty quickly, and God forbid you used a Ducklett here...

  • Flabébé: This Pokémon is weak to Steel and Poison, pretty much. (Don't ask how - the Fairy type is very confusing to me. =P) It can use the Fairy-type Fairy Wind to hurt your Dragons, Fighters, and Darklings.

Strategically, you'll want to get rid of Tierno's Corphish. Pretty much any Grass-type Pokémon you have should suffice for that duty in a single hit at this point. Or Pikachu. Whatever. After that, you narrow it down to a two-on-one since Trevor can't send in additional Pokémon to cover his teammate. Pikachu is probably best covered by Quilladan or Ivysaur due to the Electrical resistance. Those two Pokémon would also be pretty good in fighting Flabébé due to the Poison weakness...


After the battle, go south of the base of the staircase to find a PP Up, a magnificent little item that boosts the maximum PP of a move by 20% of its norm. For example, the 20-PP Flame Charge earns (20/5) or 4 PP to 24. It then can later add another 4 (you only use the base value), and another up to 32. (You can only go up by a total of 60%.) Now, go up the stairs to the west. You can call Phil the Photo Guy at the top if you want to. Also nearby is Connecting Cave - you can head there for a quick battle, but come out soon for it's mostly a dead end.

Once you return, go south and along the path. After going up the first staircase and going south, you'll find some grass if you want to battle some Pokémon. You can also head west to find a Persim Berry, and look around in the southwest corner of the patch of grass for a TinyMushroom. Go up the stairs north of the patch. Cut down the tree to the north with Cut, then go along the path to a Silver Powder. Return and go west into the creatively-named Connecting Cave.




Connecting Cave



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Axew Dragon Mold Breaker, Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Attack Both
Meditite Fighting/Psychic Pure Power, Telepathy 1 Speed Both
Whismur Normal Soundproof, Rattled 1 HP Both
Zubat Poison/Flying Inner Focus, Infiltrator 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Axew Dragon Mold Breaker, Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Attack Both
Whismur Normal Soundproof, Rattled 1 HP Both
Zubat Poison/Flying Inner Focus, Infiltrator 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Pokémon Breeder Mercy $768 Ducklett Lv. 12, Oddish Lv. 12, Pikachu Lv. 12, Litleo Lv. 12

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Those looking for a decent Fighting-type - especially those that didn't get the Torchic event from the game's release months - will probably find it in Meditite. It eventually evolves at Level 37 into Medicham, who can learn a variety of moves in addition to simple Fighting moves. Those looking for a Dragon - and, trust me, you should - will find their best hopes for now with Axew. While not the most varied, it can learn a number of decent Dragon-type moves to put down other Dragons when needed. Salamence - found by evolving Bagon twice, who is just around the corner - is much better.

WENT INTO THE FIRST CAVE?: If you did, no worries - the only reason I didn't direct you there is that it's a dead end, mostly. Go west and defeat the Pokémon Breeder. That's it, though. Both paths to the west and south are blocked by Strength boulders - that won't be doable for a while... Leave the cave and go through the entrance further south that I mentioned in the previous subsection...

WENT INTO THE SECOND CAVE?: Heh, this will be a long one. Go west. Speak with the person on the way for a free healing.




Route 8 - Cliffside



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Coastal Kalos Pokédex [_] Super Potion [_] HP Up [_] Leaf Stone

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Absol Dark Pressure, Super Luck, Justified 2 Attack Both
Bagon Dragon Rock Head, Sheer Force 1 Attack Both
Drifloon Ghost/Flying Aftermath, Unburden, Flare Boost 1 HP Both
Inkay Dark/Psychic Contrary, Suction Cups 1 Attack Both
Mienfoo Fighting Inner Focus, Regenerator, Reckless 1 Attack Both
Seviper Poison Shed Skin, Infiltrator 1 Attack, 1 Sp.Atk Y
Spoink Psychic Own Tempo, Thick Fat, Gluttony 2 Sp.Def. Both
Zangoose Normal Immunity, Toxic Boost 2 Attack X
ENCOUNTERS IN THE SHAKING GRASS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Lunatone Rock/Psychic Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Solrock Rock/Psychic Levitate 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Seviper Poison Shed Skin, Infiltrator 1 Attack, 1 Sp.Atk Both
Taillow Normal/Flying Guts, Scrappy 1 Speed Both
Wingull Water/Flying Keen Eye, Rain Dish 1 Speed Both
Zangoose Normal Immunity, Toxic Boost 2 Attack Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Rising Star Paulette $1,140 Axew Lv. 19
Rising Star Rhys $1,020 Pancham Lv. 15, Skiddo Lv. 16, Goldeen Lv. 17
Black Belt Cadoc $960 Machop Lv. 20

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: There's nothing particularly notable here, except two. Absol, for one, has a Mega-Evolution and looks just plain cool. =P Beyond that statement, Absol is well-rounded despite his favoring of Attack (about double his other base stats) and can learn a wide variety of moves. He also has that immunity to Psychic, which is nice. Then there's Bagon. While not particularly useful on its own, it will evolve to Salamence after a while. Salamence can max his stats all over 250+ with the proper set-up, and learns a huge variety of moves, including the almighty Draco Meteor!

WEATHER - RAINING

On Route 8, the weather is regularly of the Raining scenario on a permanent basis during battle unless other moves/abilities are used to alter it. (It's not always raining, though.) When it rains, Fire is weakened while Water is strengthened. Abilities like Rain Dish and Dry Skin will take effect, and the Electric-type move Thunder will not miss its target. Fair warning!


Head downstairs and the trainers from Lumiose will come up, giving you the Coastal Kalos Pokédex, an extension of the Central Kalos Pokédex for the coastal areas like Route 8. Go north and east along the precipice to find a rock at the end. Examine it for a Super Potion, then go west and south on the ledges. Keep hanging as far west as possible to easily reach an HP Up - this boosts a Pokémon's HP EVs by 10, an instant 2~3 point boost in some cases! Hop off the ledge to the east, then head south through the grass. You can speak with the girl there, too, for a Pokémon battle.

Go southeast and upstairs, then head into the flowers to the south to battle another Rising Star. Continue on south for a while and you'll soon find a grassy area. First go west to beat a Black Belt, then go past the grassy area to find an area with a lot of peg-like structures. On the west side, there are little outjuttings pointing to the pegs. Run east from the second one of these to hop across the pegs to a Leaf Stone - an item used to evolve Gloom, Weepinbell, Exeggcute, Nuzleaf, and Pansage. Now, go to the first of the outjuttings and just cross east and south. Then continue along into Ambrette.




Ambrette Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM94 (Rock Smash) [_] Dive Ball (daily) [_] Heart Scale [_] Sp. Def. Power Lv. 1 [_] Old Rod [_] Rocky Helmet
[_] TM96 (Nature Power)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

AMBRETTE TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.

As you go downstairs, your rival will come on by, noting that the aquarium (!?) leads to Cyllage. She also notes the Fossil Lab - you probably know what that means if you've played other Pokémon games. Anyhow, heal up and shop in the Center. (Seriously. Do the latter. I had like $35,000 right now.) Just outside, you can speak with the woman for TM94. TM94 teaches Rock Smash. While it's just a weak Fighting move, you can use it in the field to break small rocks, sometimes even to the point of encountering Pokémon! (Unlike the HM it used to be, you can forget it without the Move Deleter - that's not true for actual HMs.)

Southeast of there is a dude who will trade a Poké Ball for a Dive Ball once a day. A Dive Ball is a special Pokémon with a x4.0 catch rate on Pokémon you fish out of the water or find underwater in general at the time of encounter. The house to the west has a woman asking to see Pokémon with ridiculous stats; I doubt you'll find out what she wants anytime soon. Northeast of the Pokémon Center is a path leading to a Heart Scale as well.

In the house to the east of the stat house is the Fossil Lab. The Hiker in the northwest corner asks you to show him a Genesect. Genesect is a Nintendo Event-only Pokémon distributed for Pokémon Black, White, Black 2, and White 2 Versions on the Nintendo DS (released 2011/2012). I didn't grab one, so I don't know what he does. Try heading east into the next part of the lab to meet some dude that mentions Glittering Cave. Hm...

Go south and downstairs to the hotel. Within, a dude giving out TM96 will be to the east. TM96 teaches Nature Power, a move varying depending on where it's used. On the top floor is again Mr. Bonding (southeast room). He will hand you Sp. Def. Power Lv. 1. Leave and visit the aquarium near the Pokémon Center, then head downstairs and speak with the fisherman for the Old Rod. It's not quite as useless as usual - you can find Luvdisc in Ambrette, for example.


NOTE: FUTURE TRADE!

Later on when you reach Cyllage City, there will be a dude in the Pokémon Center requesting a Luvdisc. As it so happens, we can now get Luvdisc because of the Old Rod. The trade will yield the infinitely more valuable Steel/Ground-type Steelix! ^_^


Now, leave the town by heading southeast of the Fossil Lab. In the gatehouse, you can speak with the woman in the southeast corner for a Rocky Helmet, which makes direct-attackers against the wearer take damage.



Route 9



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] X Defense [_] Paralyze Heal [_] Fire Stone [_] Dusk Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Helioptile Normal/Electric Dry Skin, Sand Veil, Solar Power 1 Speed Both
Hippopotas Ground Sand Stream, Sand Force 1 Defense Both
Sandile Ground/Dark Intimidate, Anger Point, Moxie 1 Attack Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Sky Tainer Orion $2,100 Ledian Lv. 21

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Eh. Sandile is probably the most appetizing of those here if you need a Ground-type to combat the Electric-type Gym a while down the road, as well combat Psychics and Ghosts.

WEATHER - RAINING

On Route 9, the weather is regularly of the Raining scenario on a permanent basis during battle unless other moves/abilities are used to alter it. (It's not always raining, though; I found it rarely.) When it rains, Fire is weakened while Water is strengthened. Abilities like Rain Dish and Dry Skin will take effect, and the Electric-type move Thunder will not miss its target. Fair warning!


As you go along the Route, you'll find that you have to ride a Rhyhorn to bypass the rather jagged rocks to the east (which turns to north - whatever). While on those, you can encounter wild Pokémon (and, no, Rhyhorn will not be usable). When you are blocked by boulders as you proceed, hit the A Button to decimate them. Get on the smooth land nearby, smash the boulder there, then get off Rhyhorn (B) to go on up to grab the X Defense. Re-ascend onto our noble steed and continue on.

At the fork in the road ahead, go right and break down the impeding boulder, then grab the Paralyze Heal. Also go along the cliff edge for a Fire Stone - it's useful in evolving Vulpix, Growlithe, Eevee, and Pansear. (Only one of which you could've gotten by now.) Get back on Rhyhorn and go along the other fork now, continuing to tear up stuff. As you reach the open area, you can speak with the girl to get a free healing. Re-embark onto Rhyhorn before actually going into the nearby Glittering Cave, though - continue down the other path. Break down the boulder and continue on foot to reach a Dusk Ball, which has a quadruple catch rate at night or in caverns. If you ascend onto the ledges nearby, you can engage in a Sky Battle.


SKY BATTLES

^sr11|

Sky Battles take place between Pokémon that are immune to Ground-type moves (except Shedinja) - this means the Pokémon must be Flying-typed or know Levitate. There are some additional restrictions on this: despite meeting the characteristics, Pidgey, Spearow, Farfetch'd, Doduo, Dodrio, Hoothoot, Murkrow, Delibird, Taillow, Starly, Chatot, Pidove, Ducklett, Fletchling, and Hawlucha cannot participate - mostly because they're always depicted as being ground-bound visually. Some exceptions to the exceptions occur: for example, the Mega Evolutions of Charizard (in X, specifically) and Gengar can still do Sky Battles.

That's actually really it - only fliers, really, are allowed. Ground-type moves obviously have no effect, and Gravity is not allowed. EXP. and EVs earned are distributed only amongst the Pokémon able to participate in the Sky Battle - for example, even if you have Braixen or Pikachu in your active party like me, they won't get the EXP. or EVs. Otherwise, think Single Battles.


Return to Rhyhorn, backtrack to the cave entrance, heal outside, then enter.



Glittering Cave



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Hard Stone [_] TM65 (Shadow Claw) [_] Jaw/Sail Fossil [_] Escape Rope

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
FIRST-PERSON MAZE - SHADOW ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Cubone Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Battle Armor 1 Defense Both
Ferroseed Grass/Steel Iron Barbs 1 Defense Both
Kangaskhan Normal Early Bird, Scrappy, Inner Focus 2 HP Both
Lunatone Rock/Psychic Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Machop Fighting Guts, No Guard, Steadfast 1 Attack Both
Mawile Steel/Fairy Hyper Cutter, Intimidate, Sheer Force 1 Attack, 1 Defense Both
Onix Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Reckless 1 Defense Both
Solrock Rock/Psychic Levitate 2 Attack Both
Woobat Psychic/Flying Klutz, Unaware, Simple 1 Speed Both
REMAINDER - RANDOM ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Cubone Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Battle Armor 1 Defense Both
Kangaskhan Normal Early Bird, Scrappy, Inner Focus 2 HP Both
Machop Fighting Guts, No Guard, Steadfast 1 Attack Both
Mawile Steel/Fairy Hyper Cutter, Intimidate, Sheer Force 1 Attack, 1 Defense Both
Onix Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
Rhyhorn Rock/Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Reckless 1 Defense Both
REMAINDER - ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
Onix Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $720 Houndour Lv. 18, Zubat Lv. 18
Team Flare Grunt $720 Gulpin Lv. 18, Electrike Lv. 18
Team Flare Grunt (x2) $1,600 Scraggy Lv. 20, Croagunk Lv. 20

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Almost any one of them you can pick out is a good one for the long run: most of them have excellent brute power (Onix, Rhyhorn) or move variety (Machop, Kangaskhan) by the time you get enough TMs to teach them those moves. A few I'd probably avoid are Ferroseed (that dual-Fire weakness screws you) and Woobat (just not very good).

^sr12|

Our first part of the cave is a first-person maze. ... Okay, not quite first-person, but quite close to it. Kinda reminds me of the early Shin/Megami Tensei games. A map is to the right if you need it. (Note that you can battle wild Pokémon in the darker areas of the maze.) Anyhow ... Go forward to the first fork. Ignore it and continue along the path to another fork. This time, head left and to the end of the path to find a Hard Stone - it boosts the power of Rock-type moves by about 20%.

Go back to the fork and head left. Continue along the path to another fork. Again, go left at it to find TM65, which teaches Shadow Claw. Shadow Claw is a very good move to teach to your Pokémon: it is a Ghost-type move of 70 Power that has a high critical-hit rate. If you evolved the launch-day event Torchic into a Combusken as I have, you can teach it to him - it's helpful when that Fire/Fighter (heh) gets up against some kind of Ghost or Psychic Pokémon. Of course, other Pokémon can also learn it - whosoever can should.

Backtrack to the fork, then go left and along the path into the next area. There, go forward to find some dude in a red suit. Team Magma moved from Hoenn!? ... Oh, never mind, Team Flare. Seeing as you don't know to not play with fire, you'll battle him. After, go north and east to find another grunt. (I wonder if it's mandatory for them to have that funky dyed hair and unstylish clothing?) Go north and west from there to find two of 'em; your rival will ally you against them. As if it's needed.

After, go along the winding path to find a scientist. He has found two fossils, the Jaw and Sail Fossils. You get to choose one; your rival gets the other. The Jaw Fossil later becomes the Rock/Dragon Tyrunt, while the other becomes Amaura, an Ice/Rock type. Pick which one you want - Ice-type Pokémon are rare enough here, but there is that double double-weakness to Fighting and Steel, while Tyrunt makes for a decently strong, if weakness-prone, Dragon. (I chose the Sail Fossil.)

Now, either backtrack out of the cave, or go south to find and use that Escape Rope. Continue on back through Route 9 to Ambrette.




Ambrette Town Revisited



See Ambrette Town in the Shop Details section - or just Ambrette Town - if you need info on shops. They haven't changed yet.

ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Aerodactylite

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability Notes
Both [none] Tyrunt Rock/Dragon Strong Jaw Use Jaw Fossil
Both [none] Amaura Ice/Rock Refrigerate Use Sail Fossil
Both [none] Aerodactyl Rock/Flying Pressure Use Old Amber

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

NOTE - OLD AMBER

Now that you can break rocks with Rock Smash and revive fossils, it is critical to note the Old Amber item. Old Amber is randomly and rarely found when using Rock Smash to break rocks, such as those in the Glittering Cave. If you manage to find Old Amber, you can revive it to get Aerodactyl, a fossil Rock/Flying Pokémon that's pretty decent with a varied moveset. I'm not saying that you ought to grind against the rocks for ten hours - I'm saying just keep your eyes out.

In fact, Aerodactyl also has a Mega Evolution when he holds Aerodactylite...

As a further note, other Pokémon from the older games can also be found by using Rock Smash in a similar manner. I do not yet know if they're post-game-only though - I didn't find my first Lileep until coming back looking for stuff.


When you arrive, go ahead and heal in the Pokémon Center if you want. Then head back into the Fossil Lab near the Route 9 gatehouse. Speak with the person at the desk to revive your Fossil into its respective Pokémon - instantly for once! ^_^ It will be revived at Level 20, a little below what you should be for now (closer to Level 25). Go east and speak with the man to find Aerodactylite.

That's it. When you're done here, go into the aquarium and downstairs and outside.




Route 8 - Oceanic Route



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Pearl [_] Mago Berry [_] Dowsing Machine [_] Stardust [_] Ultra Ball [_] Heart Scale
[_] Pearl

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Swimmer Genevienve $960 Wingull Lv. 19
Fisherman Wharton $1,064 Tentacool Lv. 19, Tentacool Lv. 19, Tentacool Lv. 19
Fisherman Shad $1,120 Shellder Lv. 20, Staryu Lv. 20
Swimmer Marissa $352 Masquerain Lv. 22

WEATHER - RAINING

Here, the weather is regularly of the Raining scenario on a permanent basis during battle unless other moves/abilities are used to alter it. (It's not always raining, though.) When it rains, Fire is weakened while Water is strengthened. Abilities like Rain Dish and Dry Skin will take effect, and the Electric-type move Thunder will not miss its target. Fair warning!


NOTE: FUTURE TRADE!

I already noted this, but... Later on when you reach Cyllage City, there will be a dude in the Pokémon Center requesting a Luvdisc. As it so happens, we can now get Luvdisc because of the Old Rod. The trade will yield the infinitely more valuable Steel/Ground-type Steelix! ^_^ Seriously consider it: Steel and Ground both are advantageous over the Rock Gym ... which is next!


As you enter the area, go south and west downstairs. Head east and north onto the sandy beach, then turn right to the west upon touching it. Run along the coastline for a very lengthy while to find a Pearl - that's good to sell! Return to Route 8 proper and go north along the western shore to find a Mago Berry. Um ... Okay. Go east to the cliffside then north to get the Dowsing Machine - you can use it to find hidden items! It's a bit different than the usual one: you pay attention to whatever beams come in front of your character and, where they point, you go. When they cross, press A to find something. For example, to the southwest of the Mago Berry tree is a Stardust. To the southeast, you'll find an Ultra Ball in two close-together small rocks, with a Heart Scale to the west.

Continue back to the Dowsing Machine giver; southwest is a hidden Pearl. Continue north along the main path now. Past the overhang, you can fight a female Swimmer. Speak with the Fisherman to the northwest to battle him. Do the same with Shad further to the north, then continue with the female Swimmer. Continue north into Cyllage.




Cyllage Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Whipped Dream/Sachet [_] Ether [_] Pearl [_] HM04 (Strength) [_] Protein [_] X Defense
[_] X Sp. Atk. [_] X Speed [_] Bicycle [_] Persim Berry x3 [_] TM44 (Rest) [_] TM88 (Sleep Talk)
[_] Destiny Knot [_] Prize Money Power Lv. 1

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both Luvdisc Steelix Steel/Ground Rock Head

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

CYALLGE TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Dusk Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Its catch rate is x4.0 in caves and at night.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Nest Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. More effective than normal on lower-HP Pokémon.
Net Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Its catch rate is x4.0 on Bug and Water Pokémon.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.

CYLLAGE TOWN SODA POP SALESMAN
Item Name Cost Effect
Soda Pop (x1) $300 Heals 60 HP to one Pokémon in the field or battle.
Soda Pop (x12) $3,600 Heals 60 HP to one Pokémon in the field or battle.

Dat's some cool music thar.

As you enter town, go northeast and into the house. Speak with the man at the sink for a Whipped Dream or a Sachet - it depends on whether you are Pokémon X or Pokémon Y. They can be held by Swirlix or Spritzee respectively during a trade to evolve them into Slurpuff or Aromatisse, respectively. Outside, go north of the house and examine the rock for an Ether. Go west and along the beach for a while. As you reach that dark-brown curve that goes south, walk on the shallow light-blue water. Your Dowsing Machine will pick something up in the rock (Pearl) nearby.

Continue back to the town entrance and go north onto the grassy area. Go north and along the road as it eventually goes east and uphill. As you do, you'll receive HM04. HM04 teaches Strength, a powerful Normal-type move that can move boulders in the field (once you get this dude's Gym Badge). It's worth learning! Go south and along the path to the entrance of some cavern; south of it, in a rock, you'll find a Protein. They boost Attack EVs by 10, an instant 2~3 point boost at Level 100. Now head down the sandy slopes to the west for an X Defense.

If you run along the bicycle road from before, you'll soon reach a cave. This goes to the Connecting Cave; for now, leave it be, for no progress can be made without Strength being usable in the field yet. Continue along the road and go down the first slope. Carefully get to the Pokéball nearby for an X Sp. Atk. Continue down the road and, in front of the finish line, you can use the Dowsing Machine to find an X Speed.

^sr13|

Now just head south and along into the Pokémon Center. Shop and heal - those people who like the nighttime will want to buy some Dusk Balls. ;) You can also speak with the man at the left side of the Center to trade your Luvdisc for his Steelix.

In the house to the west of the Pokémon Center, you can have your lead Pokémon be massaged once daily, which boosts their Happiness (and therefore the damage from Return). In the house to the east of the Center, you'll learn that your the 10,000th ... and first ... What? ... Oh, 10,001. Never mind. Whatever the case, you enter the Bicycle Shop and are quizzed for the chance to win a Bicycle. Obviously, bikes are in more than one color, but the next question gives you a certain Bicycle color (yellow or green). Then you get your Bicycle. The main differences between these and the Roller Skates include more freedom on the latter yet speed on the bicycle, but each have their own situations to be used in.

Northeast of here, you can buy some Soda Pop ($300 each) from a guy on the street. They heal 60 HP and cost less than half of what a Super Potion (heals 70 HP) does, so stock up! In the house to the west, you can take a berry good quiz on Berries. They concern their effects (Persim heals confusion, Pecha heals poison, and Aspear thaws Pokémon)


  • Question: Which of the following Berries cures confusion?
    • Answer: Persim Berry (Aspear is for frozen, Pecha for poison)

  • Question: The move Swagger raises the target's attack, but it also causes which status condition?
    • Answer: Confused

As a result, you get three Persim Berries. You also get a (Double) Battle tip: have a Pokémon hold a Persim Berry, then let it get hit (or have an ally hit it) with Swagger to boost its Attack while the Persim Berry cures the resultant confusion. In the blue house to the northeast, you can (pointlessly) buy more clothes.

Near there is the hotel. There, go west and you can get TM44 from a guy. TM44 teaches Rest: a move that heals your Pokémon completely on the first turn while putting him to sleep. (If you hold a Chesto Berry, there is no sleep effect the first time. *wink*) However, if you want to just outright be able to talk in your sleep, the woman nearby gives you TM88, which teaches Sleep Talk: the only way to attack when asleep, it triggers the use of a different move. Upstairs, you can speak with the maid nearby to get a Destiny Knot - if the holder is infatuated, so is the Pokémon who did the infatuating. And, of course, Mr. Bonding is in the southeastern room to give you the Prize Money Power Lv. 1.

If you go into the café to the west, you can pay to sit in certain areas. If you pay $500 to sit at the counter, when you prepare to leave, you can speak with the other customer to get a picture of Axew in your Pokédex. If you pay $1,000, you can sit at a table, then speak with other customers for pictures of Kecleon and Delcatty. Finally, if you do this with $5,000, you can get a picture of a Dunsparce. ... I wonder if this ever changes. Kinda sucks that I paid $6,500 for four pictures regardless. >_>;;

Finally, we're done searching around. Heal up and shop up if you haven't done so, then enter ... the ... Ma--

Oh. Right. The Gym.




Cyllage Town Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM39 (Rock Tomb) [_] Cliff Badge

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Rising Star Didier $1,380 Dwebble Lv. 21, Relicanth Lv. 23
Hiker Craig $1,344 Roggenrola Lv. 24
Rising Star Manon $1,320 Solrock Lv. 22, Lunatone Lv. 22
Hiker Bernard $1,176 Rhyhorn Lv. 21, Onix Lv. 21, Nosepass Lv. 21

The Gym is basically one big pillar in the middle of a cave. On the face you see and the one to the right are rock-climbing walls from the ground. The one on the right will let you skip over Didier, although ... you know, EXP. and money. Go up the stairs nearby and use the rock wall to the left this time. Go along the path for a bit (be sure to not use the sand slope). If you climb up the first rock wall you see, you can battle that Hiker, but it's a dead end. On ground, continue going clockwise around to Manon and another wall. From there, just keep going along the path to Bernard (though you can skip him when he's not looking) and then to Grant!

BOSS: Gym Leader Grant

  • Rewards: $4,000; TM39 (Rock Tomb); Cliff Badge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Amaura Rock/Ice Level 25 N/A
Tyrunt Rock/Dragon Level 25 N/A

  • Amaura: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting (x4), Steel (x4), Water, Grass, Ground, and Rock. It can use the Ice-type Aurora Beam to hurt your Grass, Ground, and Flying types, though. There's also Rock Tomb to hurt Ice, Bug, Fire, and Flyng, and Thunder Wave to cause Paralysis.

  • Tyrunt: Tyrunt is weak to Ice, Fighting, Ground, Steel, and Dragon. He is noted for his Bite move (hurts Psychic/Ghost most) and Rock Tomb, which is the same as Amaura.

First will come Amaura - that one, you should tear through it like it were tissue paper, easily. If you brought along a Fighting type, such as Pancham, Machoke, or Combusken (if you did the launch day Nintendo Event), you shouldn't have a problem. There's also Honedge from Route 7 with its Steel-type moves. Frogadier, Simipour, and Wartortle are good ideas as well for him. Basically ... he's dead. Just don't bring in anything weak to Ice or Rock if you can't abuse the double-weaknesses to Fighting or Steel.

As for Tyrunt, you will more problems. Mildly. So not really. Tyrunt can be taken down with Bagon, Fraxure, your own Tyrunt, your own Amaura, Machoke, Krokodile, Honedge, Combusken ... Dude, the list is long. Even then, if you have a Water or Grass starter Pokémon, those move types hit for neutral damage. You have plenty of options all around: this will be a breeze at around Level 28, if you're like me. I mean, we're talking Level 25 Combusken with Double Kick that only gets to hit once. =P


After the battle, you will receive the Cliff Badge - this allows all traded Pokémon up to Level 40 to obey you. It also lets you use HM04 (Strength) outside of Pokémon battles. You will also obtain TM39, which teaches the moderately-useful Rock Tomb.

w00t. Climb down the other staircase and slide on outta here.



Rumble Badge



Sectional Flowchart






Leaving Cyllage - To Connecting Cave!



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM40 (Aerial Ace) [_] TM21 (Frustration)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Axew Dragon Mold Breaker, Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Attack Both
Meditite Fighting/Psychic Pure Power, Telepathy 1 Speed Both
Whismur Normal Soundproof, Rattled 1 HP Both
Zubat Poison/Flying Inner Focus, Infiltrator 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Axew Dragon Mold Breaker, Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Attack Both
Whismur Normal Soundproof, Rattled 1 HP Both
Zubat Poison/Flying Inner Focus, Infiltrator 1 Speed Both

After defeating Grant in the Cyllage Gym, and consequentially taking the Cliff Badge, you can head onto Route 10 if you want. However, since we now have the ability to use Strength, we'll visit Connecting Cave and ... you know, make it live up to its name. First go heal up at the Pokémon Center, then use the bike track near the Gym to go into the cave.

Just inside the entrance, go east and examine the boulder. If you've taught someone to use Strength, you will be prompted to move the boulder. Do so to reach TM40. This teaches Aerial Ace, a Flying-type move of 60 Power (90 on Flying Pokémon) that never misses! Head south and east from the entrance to push in that boulder there, then speak with the Backpacker to get TM21. This teaches Frustration, a move that grows more powerful as the Pokémon hates you - that means you shouldn't ever use Pokémon-Amie with it and use the often-cheaper-and-more-prolific Herbs a lot on it. I mean, I don't like Pokémon hating me, but... I dunno, some people do it.

If you go east and south, you can push in another boulder, connecting all four parts of this cavern. (You can also go south for a free healing, like it matters.) That'll do it, if you fought the Pokémon Breeder east of the Backpacker last time like I recommended. So, then, return to Cyllage, heal up and stuff, and exit northwest onto Route 10.




Route 10



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Iapapa Berry [_] TM73 (Thunder Wave) [_] Revive [_] Mind Plate [_] X Accuracy [_] Paralyze Heal
[_] Burn Heal [_] Thunder Stone

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Eevee Normal Adaptability, Run Away, Anticipation 1 Sp.Def. Both
Electrike Electric Lightningrod, Static, Minus 1 Speed Y
Emolga Electric/Flying Static, Motor Drive 2 Speed Both
Golett Ground/Ghost Iron Fist, Klutz, No Guard 1 Attack Both
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Limber, Unburden 2 Attack Both
Houndour Dark/Fire Early Bird, Flash Fire, Unnerve 1 Sp.Atk. X
Sigilyph Psychic/Flying Magic Guard, Wonder Skin, Tinted Lens 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Snubbull Fairy Intimidate, Run Away, Rattled 1 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Electrike Electric Lightningrod, Static, Minus 1 Speed Y
Houndour Dark/Fire Early Bird, Flash Fire, Unnerve 1 Sp.Atk. X
Nosepass Rock Magnet Pull, Sturdy, Sand Force 1 Defense Both
Yanma Bug/Flying Compoundeyes, Speed Boost, Frisk 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Psychic Robert $1,232 Solosis Lv. 22
Tourist Fumiko $1,520 Skiploom Lv. 19, Azumarill Lv. 19, Dunsparce Lv. 19
Team Flare Grunt $920 Houndour Lv. 21, Golbat Lv. 23
Psychic Sayid $1,232 Meditite Lv. 19, Kirlia Lv. 21
Team Flare Grunt $840 Electrike Lv. 23, Croagunk Lv. 21
Team Flare Grunt $960 Gulpin Lv. 24
Tourist Tomoko $1,520 Drifloon Lv. 19, Pachirisu Lv. 19, Hippopotas Lv. 19

WEATHER - RAINING

Here, the weather is regularly of the Raining scenario on a permanent basis during battle unless other moves/abilities are used to alter it. (It's not always raining, though.) When it rains, Fire is weakened while Water is strengthened. Abilities like Rain Dish and Dry Skin will take effect, and the Electric-type move Thunder will not miss its target. Fair warning!


POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Above all else, I recommend absolutely grinding your way here into an Eevee. Eevee is THE most versatile Pokémon of this game. It can evolve into eight different Pokémon: the Fire-type Flareon, the Electric-type Jolteon, the Water-type Vaporeon, the Dark-type Umbreon, the Psychic-type Espeon, the Grass-type Leafeon, the Ice-type Glaceon, and the Fairy-type Sylveon, depending on certain conditions. (See the Pokémon Evolutions section for more details on how.) It would be ideal to find one that rounds out your starters: for example, someone with Charmander and Chespin may want Vaporeon, Then again, you have Umbreon who can combat the Ghost- and Psychic-type Pokémon for the most part, which isn't something everyone can say, or Glaceon who can ward off Dragons. It's up to you in that regard. The rest become relatively lackluster compared to him. Emolga is decent in that he's fast and immune to the Electric bane of Ground (but is weak to Rock and Ice). Golett is nice due to his three immunities (Normal, Fighting, Electric) and he can learn moves to combat most of his weaknesses. That's about it here. Your version-exclusive may be nice to pick up if you don't have a Fire-type (X) or Electric-type (Y), but you could've picked up better ones (Fletchling evolves into Fletchinder, Pikachu and Emolga) now or earlier.

Anyhow, onto Route 10!

Go north for a bit and, as the path turns northwest, you can grab an Iapapa Berry. Continue west to a Psychic guy (who fails to predict his defeat). ... Oh, come on Game Freak, you're so above those lame cliché references by now. x_x After rolling your eyes, go west to find a Tourist to battle. Go back east and cross the flowers to a Strength boulder. Push it forward to get to the other side. There, go northwest to find another. Push it south twice, east thrice, north twice, east, north, and east for a while to reach TM73. This teaches Thunder Wave, a move that causes Paralysis and is immensely helpful in Pokémon capture! (Also, near where you first pushed the boulder south, use the Dowsing Machine to find a Revive in a rock!)

From where Fumiko was, go west and north to find a bunch of pillars. Go east upon entering this field to find a Mind Plate - it boosts the power of Psychic moves, and turns Arceus into a Psychic when held. Speak with the backpacker to the northwest if you want a reference to Pokémon Black/White Versions 2, then go north while hugging the west side for an X Accuracy. East of there, use the Dowsing Machine to hunt down a Paralyze Heal, then go west and north to the next portion of the field. You'll fight a Team Flare Grunt as you do.

After the slaughter, go east to the southeast corner of this second field and examine the empty grass tile to find a Burn Heal. Go northwest to find another Psychic, then north to find a Thunder Stone - it evolves Pikachu, Eevee (!), and Eelektrik. Head east and north into the third field now.

You'll fight another Flare Grunt as you go in. Another one can be found by following the (tall)-grassless route west and north. Head east of there and defeat Tomoko - who uses only Sinnoh Pokémon, I might add. (I never could understand why Pachirisu would never evolve. I mean, I know it doesn't, but it seems like the type to evolve. >_>) That battle will just about finish Route 10 - go north into Stonehe--

I mean Geosenge Town.




Geosenge Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM66 (Payback) [_] Soft Sand [_] Timer Ball [_] Speed Power Lv. 1 [_] Everstone

GEOSENGE TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)

As you enter town, go west and use the Pokémon Center to heal, shop, what-have-you. Be sure to stock up on the newly-available Revives and Hyper Potions! Also, within the Center, speak with one of the guys to the left to get TM66 - it teaches Payback, which is doubly powerful if your Pokémon goes second. Outside, go north and you'll see a Team Flare dude run off. First go west and south to find a Soft Sand, which is used to boost the holder's Ground-type move power by 20%. If you head due north a bit, you'll see the dude continue on elsewhere. *shrug*

Return to the Pokémon Center and go east and north and west to the back of that house to find a Timer Ball. In the upper floor of said building, you can find a guy in the southwest room referencing Lavaridge Town of the Hoenn region. And, of course, Mr. Bonding in the third gives you -- *sarcastic gasp* -- Speed Power Lv. 1. Head into the building northwest of the Pokémon Center to snatch up an Everstone from the scientist - this prevents Pokémon evolution when held. (As a note, it's pointless as you can cancel it. I suppose if cancelling with every level-up annoys you, go for it.)

If you speak with the girl nearby to the east, then follow her into the hotel, she'll reference the stones on Route 10 and how they could've been used. (Many theories she names are those for the Stonehenge question.) Try leaving town heading east and you'll run into Korrina, the Gym Leader with the Lucarios from before. Hammer time!


BOSS: Gym Leader Korrina

  • Rewards: $4,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Lucario Fighting/Steel Level 25 N/A
Lucario Fighting/Steel Level 25 N/A

  • Lucario: These Poké's are weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground moves. They know about the same moveset. Power-Up Punch gets more powerful with consecutive use and heavily hurts Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark Pokémon, whereas the Dark-type Feint (much weaker) hurts Psychic and Ghost primarily. Swords Dance will build up their Attack, and Metal Sound lowers your Defense.

Not too difficult a battle, especially if you ended up grabbing one of the two Fire starters (should be at least Charmeleon/Braixen by now). If not, there's also Fletchinder - who is actually more useful than the starters! - Flareon, and Simisear for Fire-types. There's also Krokorok for Ground, Machoke for Fighting, and ... well, Combusken for the launch-of-X/Y-event participants covers two areas. =P But worry not. It's not difficult.


Congratulations! For winning, you get the Rum--

Oh, come on! We're supposed to get the Badge. *Pikachu uses Thunderbolt* Ranting and murder aside, if you need to heal, do so before leaving eastward onto Route 11.




Route 11



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Sitrus Berry [_] Super Potion [_] TM69 (Rock Polish) [_] Hyper Potion [_] Thunder Stone

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Chingling Psychic Levitate 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Dedenne Electric/Fairy Cheek Pouch, Pickup 2 Speed Both
Hariyama Fighting Guts, Thick Fat, Sheer Force 2 HP Both
Nidorina Poison Poison Point, Rivalry, Hustle 2 HP Both
Nidorino Poison Poison Point, Rivalry, Hustle 2 Attack Both
Sawk Fighting Inner Focus, Sturdy, Mold Breaker 2 Attack X
Staravia Normal/Flying Intimidate, Reckless 2 Speed Both
Stunky Poison/Dark Aftermath, Stench, Keen Eye 1 Speed Both
Throh Fighting Guts, Inner Focus, Mold Breaker 2 HP Y
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Nidoran Poison Poison Point, Rivalry, Hustle 1 HP Both
Nidoran Poison Poison Point, Rivalry, Hustle 1 Attack Both
Starly Normal/Flying Keen Eye 1 Speed Both
Stunky Poison/Dark Aftermath, Stench, Keen Eye 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Psychic Emanuel $1,344 Solosis Lv. 24, Sigilyph Lv. 25
Battle Girl Geraldine $1,344 Mienfoo Lv. 25
Sky Trainer Yvette $1,344 Emolga Lv. 23
Brains & Brawn Frank & Sly $1,344 Mr. Mime Lv. 26, Machoke Lv. 28

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Nothing too special all around. The Nidorina/Nidorino are the highlights of the Route, being able to evolve via a Moon Stone into Nidoqueen and Nidoking, rather strong Pokémon as far as brute strength goes. Most of the others - Sawk/Throh, Starly, Hariyama - are just replacements for Pokémon types you should've gotten before. As a note, Sawk will be pretty easy to catch if you can hit it with something super-effective - Sturdy may stop it from being killed, leaving just 1 HP. ;)

As you arrive on Route 11, go southeast and grab the Sitrus Berry, then battle the nearby Psychic. Go up the stairs and examine the crystalline object nearby for a Super Potion, then go southeast and battle the Battle Girl. Continue east and north alone the path and you'll get a Holo Clip from Prof. Sycamore. Once it's done with, go left and Cut the tree. In doing so, you can go northwest and slide down the sandy slope to TM69 - while not as useful as in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon, some still find Rock Polish's Speed boost helpful. Return to the main path and go up the next unascended staircase.

Go east and south at its apex to reach a Hyper Potion. Continue up the stairs to the east to the top, then examine the small northwestern crystal to find a second Thunder Stone in just as many Routes. O_o What a shock. Approach the north side of the ledge to engage in a Sky Battle, if you can/want. Don't expect it to be easy unless you have an Emolga yourself as hers can use Spark, super-effective to most Pokémon of Flying-something types (other than Landorus's Ground/Flying and several Electric/Flying, mostly).

Head on back down the stairs and go north into the cave - you'll have a Double Battle on the way.




Reflection Cave



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Revive [_] Nest Ball [_] Moon Stone [_] Black Belt [_] TM70 (Flash) [_] Escape Rope
[_] Hyper Potion [_] TM74 (Gyro Ball) [_] Earth Plate [_] Iron

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Carbink Rock/Fairy Clear Body, Sturdy 1 Defense, 1 Sp.Def. Both
Chingling Psychic Levitate 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Mr. Mime Psychic/Fairy Filter, Soundproof, Technician 2 Sp.Def. Both
Roggenrola Rock Sturdy, Sand Force 1 Defense Both
Sableye Dark/Ghost Keen Eye, Stall, Prankster 1 Attack, 1 Defense Both
Solosis Psychic Magic Guard, Overcoat, Regenerator 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Wobbuffet Psychic Shadow Tag, Telepathy 2 HP Both
ENCOUNTERS ONLY IN THE SHADOWS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Ferroseed Grass/Steel Iron Barbs 1 Defense Both
Woobat Psychic/Flying Klutz, Unaware, Simple 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Carbink Rock/Fairy Clear Body, Sturdy 1 Defense, 1 Sp.Def. Both
Mime Jr. Psychic/Fairy Filter, Soundproof, Technician 1 Sp.Def. Both
Roggenrola Rock Sturdy, Sand Force 1 Defense Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Backpacker Lane $1,040 Linoone Lv. 26
Battle Gurl Hedvig $1,248 Throh Lv. 25, Hawlucha Lv. 26
Ace Trainer Monique $2,500 Doduo Lv. 24, Granbull Lv. 24, Helioptile Lv. 25
Tourist Monami $1,872 Nidorina Lv. 26
Black Belt Igor $1,248 Sawk Lv. 28
Psychic Franz $1,344 Chimecho Lv. 24, Golett Lv. 25
Tourist Haruto $1,872 Nidorino Lv. 26
Honeymooners Yuu & Ami $3,744 Combee Lv. 26, Vespiquen Lv. 26
Ace Trainer Emil $2,500 Absol Lv. 26, Pinsir Lv. 25
Hiker Dunstan $1,344 Sandile Lv. 23, Dwebble Lv. 23, Diggersby Lv. 24

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: This area isn't too impressive, as far as long-term strategy goes. The main highlight is probably Sableye. Sableye can learn enough moves to give it some variety, but more significant is that it doesn't have any weaknesses due to its type (plus three immunities: Normal, Fighting, Psychic). Mr. Mime also has a pretty decent variety of moves, but his base stats are heavily geared towards Special Attack and Special Defense, so it would take some dedicated EV training to really supplement his Attack/Defense to where Mr. Mime could actually be useful long-term. As a note, Roggenrola will be really easy to catch if you can use a super-effective (Water, Grass, Steel, Ground, or Fighting) move on it - it typically has the Sturdy ability, which makes it go down to one HP if it would've been killed. A similar philosophy goes for Carbink.

^sr14|

MIRROR, MIRROR ON THE WALL... A lot of the walls in this cave have been polished to such a point that they function as mirrors. Other than being used to adore yourself (*cough* narcissist *cough*), the enemy Trainers in the cave can use them to view you. Basically, if they're looking at the mirror, entering their usual line of sight starts a battle, and stepping directly opposite the line of sight (so they see you in the mirror in a straight line from the real them to the virtual you) also begins the battle. The diagram to the right may simplify things.

When you begin this... Well, it's a pretty long walk for a bit. At the north/south fork, go north and east along the narrow path to a Revive, then back west and north for a Nest Ball. Return to the fork and head south, then south against at the next fork. You'll eventually reach a Battle Girl (Hah! I beat her to that line!) to battle. Go south from there and along the path to find a Moon Stone - notably useful in evolving the Nidorina/Nidorino you could find in the previous Route, plus Clefairy, Jigglypuff, Skitty, and Munna. Return north, then go east to battle Monique. After acing that fight, go down the nearby stairs.

Speak with the girl nearby to recover your Pokémon - thank goodness, too; my Delphox was low on PP! -_-; Head east some more and you'll find a Tourist to fight. After doing so, go east and north to reach a Black Belt, which boosts the power of Fighting moves. Return to the Tourist and head south now. You'll soon come upon Tierno, who will yield TM70. TM70 is Flash, which lowers the accuracy of your opponents; similarly to Rock Smash, while is not an HM, you can use in the field to light up darker caves and to lessen the wild Pokémon encounter rate. (I'm not sure of the former at present - it has been its use since Generation I, though!)

Continue east along the path to find an Escape Rope. Head west, south, and downstairs to find a Black Belt who wants to BATTLE! After bringing him to DESPAIR, continue along the linear path to a Psychic, then a Tourist (separated from his fiancé, the previous Tourist) to battle. Go northwest from there to battle some honeymooning Tourists - kinda funny how their Pokémon could symbolize a relationship. (Vespiquen being a queen, Combee being a slave... Hey, I didn't say it was a good relationship! =P)

Head east and downstairs for the Hyper Potion, then go far to the west and a little south to find an Ace Trainer. (Oh, cool, Absol!) After the fight, go southwest and south, then west at the fork. Go along the path downstairs. There, go west and north to the mirrors. Go west and, while doing so, look at the mirror - use that to go into the entrance you'll see. Go southwest there to find TM74 - it teaches Gyro Ball, a Steel-type move that gains power as the user gets slower. If you go south an area, you can go along the path to some light, but I don't know its purpose. Anyways, back at the mirrors, go east this time and go south at the end (you can see the stairs in the mirror) to reach an Earth Plate. This item boosts the power of the holder's Ground-type moves; on Arceus, it will turn it into a Ground-type.

Return to where you fought Emil and go northwest of him for an Iron. An Iron boosts the target's Defense EVs by 10, an instant 2~3 point boost at Level 100. Go west to the next area and fight the nearby Hiker. You can use Strength on the boulder nearby to make a shortcut back towards where you fought Monique. Go north and outside if you want. (The scientist to the west speaks of the Reveal Glass. This item was used in Pokémon Black/White Versions to turn Tornadus, Thundurus, and Landorus into their "real" Therian Formes.)




Shalour City & The Tower of Mastery



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Critical Power Lv. 1 [_] Intriguing Stone [_] Eviolite [_] Soothe Bell [_] Stardust x5 [_] Leppa Berry
[_] X Sp. Atk. [_] Max Repel

SHALOUR CITY POKÉMART - GENERAL STORE
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)

SHALOUR CITY POKÉMART - TMs
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Dig (TM28) $10,000 Ground Physical 10 80 100 One Two-turn move
Hail (TM07) $50,000 Ice Status 10 --- --- Field Makes it hail for 5~7 turns
Poison Jab (TM84) $10,000 Poison Physical 20 80 100 One May cause Poison
Safeguard (TM20) $30,000 Normal Status 25 --- --- Allies Prevents status ailments for 5 turns
Sandstorm (TM37) $50,000 Rock Status 10 --- --- Field Makes a 5-to-7-turn sandstorm

When you arrive, head north and into the Pokémon Center for the usual heal-and-splurge that accompanies new towns. There are some TMs you can buy, most notably - Poison Jab and Dig are the best ones up there unless you have specific strategies regarding Hail/Sandstorm. (Hey, it's been done ... I just don't think you have enough Pokémon of the needed types to make it work well enough, until PokéBank is up anyways.) 

Mr. Bonding is also in the Pokémon Center, on the west side, giving you Critical Power Lv. 1. Additionally, in the Pokémon Center, you can speak with the southeastern guy. He claims to have been playing this game where you smack enemies to the beat of the music. To the curious, that is a reference to another Game Freak game (only in the 3DS eShop) - HarmoKnight. It's actually quite fun, and contains a few references to the Pokémon music within it (one in the free demo!). ... Just some trivia for you.

If you go north of the Pokémon Center, you can also compare Coastal Kalos 'Dexes with Trevor: my 56 beat him. >_> How lazy is he, again? If you were to continue north from there, you can get the Intriguing Stone from Tierno as you go onto the dirt. If you head into the house east of the Pokémon Center, if you've discovered over 50 Pokémon in the Coastal Kalos 'Dex, you'll get the Eviolite, which powers up the Defense and Special Defense of Pokémon that are not yet fully evolved.

In the first house west of the Center, you can speak with the elderly lady to get a Soothe Bell, if your lead Pokémon likes you enough. (It makes it easier for Pokémon to get Happy as far as Happiness is concerned.) In the next house, you can get a Footprint Ribbon - it's of no real point, though - if your Pokémon, again, likes you enough (or at least has been leveled up enough). The woman at the northeast corner will give you five Stardusts if you bring along a Flying- or Psychic-type Pokémon along with you.

^sr15|The Tower of Mastery...

If you go to the north of here, you can find a house beside the Pokémon Gym. A guy within will trade a Sitrus Berry for a Leppa Berry - Leppa Berries heal 10 PP for a move that gets low on PP during battle if held, or just heal 10 PP upon use. If you go outside and behind the bench to the west, you can use the Dowsing Machine to find an X Sp. Atk. However, the Gym itself is not open - Korrina is doing Gym Leader stuff at the Tower of Mastery. Go east and down onto the beach, then north to the tower. On the way, head northwest on the beach to find a Stardust in a rock.

Inside the Tower perimeter, go east from the actual Tower entrance and use the Dowsing Machine to find a Max Repel. Enter the Tower ... of course there'd be a Lucario statue. Approach the door beneath it to find Korrina and the Mega-Evo guru. Tierno and Trevor soon follow. You'll be asked as to where you got the Intriguing Stone. Outside, we find that your rival and Shauna have come, too. Eventually, we get on the subject of Mega Evolution.

Mega Evolution is only able to take place in Pokémon thought to not be able to evolve any further. Take that Charizard that I know about a third of ya'll have. It can Mega Evolve, despite not being able to do so in other ways: Happiness, Level 100, Stones, trades, you name it, it won't normally evolve. Only some Pokémon can do this, though - for example, Pokémon native to Kalos cannot. Mega Evolution is just a temporal energy/power boost on your Pokémon, able to increase its power and alter its base stats, even to the point of changing types and abilities (not just appearance!). Mega Evolution is induced with two things: a Mega Stone unique to the species, and the Mega Ring. The Guru only has one Mega Ring to spare, though. Most of the group drops out of the running immediately ... leaving you and your rival.

Speak with her to begin.


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $3,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 28 N/A
Absol Dark Level 28 N/A
Braixen Fire Level 30 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Quilladen Grass Level 30 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Frogadier Water Level 30 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this 'un. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psybeam for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug.

  • Braixen: This Pokémon is weak to Ground, Water, and Rock. It can use Fire Spin for extra damage on Steel, Grass, Ice, and Bug; there's also Psybeam for extra on Poison and Fighting. Fire Spin could also burn you and it's multi-turn.

  • Quilladen: This starter is weak to Ice, Flying, Fire, Bug, and Poison. It'll have a type-based advantage over Ground, Rock, and Water.

  • Frogadier: To make this Pokémon croak, you'll want to use Grass and Electric before its Water-type moves drown your Fire-, Rock-, and Ground-types. Not much notable, though.

This battle will be pretty easy, at least to start with. Meowstic is one of those you can one-hit-kill with someone that knows the Shadow Claw move you could've gotten a few dungeons back. Pokémon like Absol (heh) also work well against it. Of course, the only one I actually really recommended to you throughout the guide was Honedge (Ghost/Steel), due to its resistances: if you paid attention, you'll notice it paying off here.

Absol is one of those you can take down with your Fighting-type - and probably should. If Chespin has evolved into Chesnaught, you're probably good here. There's also Machoke... Well, there's no real reason to be picky with this one: just avoid your Psychic- and Ghost-types and you'll be fine.

Now, your rival's starter... If you didn't play it smart earlier when you got your Kanto starter, you could be screwed. If you chose Fennekin, you should've gotten Bulbasaur; Chespin, get Squirtle; Froakie, get Charmander. If you can substitute one of those in (like the simian Pokémon) because you didn't get the proper Pokémon, that'll work fine. It's still mostly weakness abuse, but I felt it needed to be emphasized - I mean, "cover your weaknesses" is not a hard-to-grasp tactic, especially when it's repeated throughout the entire series. >_>

Participants will work fine at Level 30+. (I was already Level 35~41.) As it was, I took down the first two with Delphox and the third (Frogadier) with Pikachu.


So ... to the Gym. Be sure to heal up beforehand. The Shalour Gym is primarily Fighting-based, so bring along Psychic-, Flying-, and Fairy-type Pokémon. (So, yes, if you have Delphox, you win by default. Though it's not because of the Lucarios: some have a weakness to Fire.)

(I swear, the Tower of Mastery music makes me think so much of Final Fantasy X. It's been so long...)




Shalour City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM98 (Power-Up Punch) [_] Rumble Badge

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Roller Skater Shun $864 Pancham Lv. 28, Throh Lv. 27, Machoke Lv. 28
Roller Skater Kate $896 Meditite Lv. 28, Meinfoo Lv. 28
Roller Skater Dash $960 Heracross Lv. 30
Roller Skater Rolanda $928 Sawk Lv. 27, Hariyama Lv. 30

LEEEEEEEEEEET'S GET READY TO RUUUUUUUUMMMMMMMBBBBBBBLLLLLEEE!

>_>

You knew it was coming.

Anyways, the goal of this Gym is to first beat all four of the other Trainers to get to Korrina. Begin by go north to grind on the rail. Here, you can battle one Skater, Shun. If you wait around, another, Kate, will come by. You have to stop in front of her, then talk to her first before you can battle. Near the southwest corner of the area is the aptly-named Dash. Finally, Rolanda can be found a bit north of there.

After, cross the newly-formed bridge to fight Korrina ... again!


BOSS: Gym Leader Korrina

  • Rewards: $5,120; TM98 (Power-Up Punch); Rumble Badge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mienfoo Fighting Level 29 N/A
Machoke Fighting Level 28 N/A
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Level 32 N/A

  • Mienfoo: A simple Pokémon, weak to Flying, Psychic, and Fairy. It can use Power-Up Punch - get acquainted with that as Machoke also uses it. It boosts in power with consecutive use and really hurts Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark. There's also Fake-Out and DoubleSlap, which are worth little mention. ... Ironically, I believe all three of those moves will miss if you're using a Ghost-type like Honedge. O_o

  • Machoke: Much more muscular, this guy will also be weak to Fairy, Psychic, and Flying. It also uses Power-Up Punch and can use Rock Tomb. This latter move really hurts Ice, Bug, Fire, and Flying - pay attention to the latter.

  • Hawlucha: Fighting/Flying Pokémon are meant to be a pain, I suppose. Electric, Ice, Flying, Psychic, and Fairy will all do extra damage on this guy; Ground does nothing. The only move I noticed him use (offensively) was Flying Press, a Fighting move of 80 Power (120 on him). It is also somehow Flying type - given that, I suppose a Fighting/Flying-type move's advantages are over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, Grass, Bug, and Fighting. >_> Ironic how it doesn't hit but one of those it should hit.

Strategically not nearly as difficult as one might think. If you thought that at all. If you have a good Psychic, Flying, or Fairy Pokémon - Delphox, Kadabra, Gardevoir, Pidgeot, Fletchinder, and Mr. Mime all come to mind - you'll have absolutely no problem here. Given that you're more likely to be in the Level 30 ~ 40 range, you could one-hit-kill some of these... My Delphox just blasted each with Psyshock once and I won.


After the battle, enjoy earning the Rumble Badge - for real this time! It lets Pokémon up to Level 50 obey you if traded, and also lets you Surf outside of battle. (Once you get the HM, of course.) You also get TM98, which teaches Power-Up Punch: it is a Fighting move that gets more powerful with consecutive use.

w00t w00t!



Plant Badge



Sectional Flowchart






The Tower of Mastery & Mega-Evolution



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM47 (Low Sweep) [_] Mega Ring [_] HM03 (Surf)

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both [none] Lucario Steel/Fighting Steadfast

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
SURFING
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Tentacool Poison/Water Clear Body, Liquid Ooze, Rain Dish 1 Sp.Def. Both
Mantyke Flying/Water Swift Swim, Water Absorb, Water Veil 1 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

After obtaining the Rumble Badge, you'll be told to go the top of the Tower of Mastery to find the Mega Ring. Leave the Gym and heal up, then go on into the Tower. Ascend the spiral stairs for a while. In the third room you can enter, the boy nearby will give you TM47 - Low Sweep, a Fighting move that is move powerful on heavy Pokémon. (Poor Groudon. =P) Past there is another door leading to the outside.

You'll receive the Mega Ring. Suddenly ... Well, we'll let it unfold before your own eyes.


BOSS: Successor Korrina

  • Rewards: None

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Lucario Fighting/Steel Level 32 N/A

  • Lucario: They (yours and Korrina's) are weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground moves. They know about the same moveset. Power-Up Punch gets more powerful with consecutive use and heavily hurts Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark Pokémon. We won't concern ourselves with the rest.

This is meant to be more of a tutorial on Mega Evolution. So, from the top...

As usual, each Pokémon that can Mega Evolve - before it can do so - must be holding the Mega Stone of its species. For example, Lucario holds Lucarionite. You must also have the Mega Ring, which you do. Tap Fight on the battle screen, then tap Mega Evolution. You then need to choose a move. Of the moves Lucario has, Power-Up Punch abuses STAB and hits a weak point for triple damage (120 Power). Use it twice to win.


^sr16|

For winning the battle, you will receive the Lucario as a gift from Korrina to you - this includes the Lucarionite it holds. Now, Mega Ring in hand, you are able to do any Mega Evolution available to you. For now, that probably is limited to Mega Lucario, the Mega version of your Kanto starter, and - for those having done the X/Y launch Torchic event - Mega Blaziken.

Once you're ready, leave the Tower and heal and restock in the Pokémon Center. Then go east onto our next Route - your rival will come by and you give HM03 as you do. HM03 teaches Surf, a 90-Power Water-type move that hits most Pokémon on the field. It also lets you cross water in the (actual) field.


ITEM BACKTRACKING!

Want to go back to find some extra items and battle some additional trainers, as well as probably being able to find new, stronger Pokémon? Then click on the links below: they'll take you down to sections further ahead in the guide regarding areas you can only get to via Surf.






Route 12



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Honey [_] Aspear Berry [_] Net Ball [_] Leftovers [_] TM45 (Attract) [_] Whipped Dream/Sachet
[_] Shiny Stone [_] Ice Heal [_] Water Stone

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both [none] Lapras Water/Ice Water Absorb

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Chatot Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 1 Attack Both
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Chlorophyll, Harvest 1 Defense Both
Heracross Bug/Fighting Guts, Swarm, Moxie 2 Attack Y
Miltank Normal Scrappy, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 2 Defense Both
Pachirisu Electric Pickup, Run Away, Volt Absorb 1 Speed Both
Pinsir Bug Hyper Cutter, Mold Breaker, Moxie 2 Attack X
Slowpoke Water/Psychic Oblvious, Own Tempo, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Tauros Normal Anger Point, Intimidate, Sheer Force 1 Attack, 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES (GRASS)
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Mareep Electric Static, Plus 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Miltank Normal Scrappy, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 2 Defense Both
Tauros Normal Anger Point, Intimidate, Sheer Force 1 Attack, 1 Speed Both
Wingull Water/Flying Keen Eye, Rain Dish 1 Speed Both }
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Lapras Water/Ice Shell Armor, Water Absorb, Hydration 2 HP Both
Mantyke Flying/Water Swift Swim, Water Absorb, Water Veil 1 Sp.Def. Both
Tentacool Poison/Water Clear Body, Liquid Ooze, Rain Dish 1 Sp.Def. Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Swimmer Alessandro $432 Qwilfish Lv. 28
Backpacker Joren $1,120 Linoone Lv. 28
Pokémon Breeder Amala $1,856 Seviper Lv. 27, Miltank Lv. 29
Youngster Aidan $648 Yanma Lv. 27, Whirlipede Lv. 27, Mothim Lv. 28
Pokémon Breeder Foster $1,856 Zangoose Lv. 27, Tauros Lv. 29
Fisherman Murray $1,344 Magikarp Lv. 24 (x6)

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Not a whole lot of good here. The main feature is the rare Lapras. While not particularly strong - its non-HP base stats barely averaging 85 ~ 90 - it is quite a tank, and it does have a nice variety of moves, especially Surf and Waterfall if you need a Water-HM slace. Tauros and Miltank are also pretty good for tanking. A good few of the Pokémon on this Route also have Mega Evolutions - Pinsir, Heracross, Ampharos (evolved from Mareep) being among them. But, on pure strategy, you won't find much good beyond Lapras - everything else could've been done long ago and done better (Pachirisu/Mareep), or just too prone to weakness (Heracross/Mantyke). ... Of course, you don't have to hunt for Lapras, anyways.

^sr17|

As you enter the main Route, speak with the guy near the gate. If you have an empty slot in your party, you can take in his Level 30 Lapras! Lapras is capable of learning Surf, which is convenient since we'll need it. Soon. After this, go into the grass to the north and examine the grassless patch ... Well, it has grass on it, but no TALL grass, how 'bout that? ... for a Honey. Go south of the gatehouse and Cut down the tree to soon find an Aspear Berry.

Now, get on the beach and start Surfing. (Ah, I miss Surfing Pikachu...) Near is Alessandro, so why not start by drow-- I mean defeating his Pokémon? Cross to the other beach and head south and east to battle Joren. Go far to the south along the beach to the end where two stones impede you. Examine the northeast for a convenient Net Ball, then go back north and ascend the stairs. Go south first and hug the left side as you go through the flowers to find a Cut tree. Chop 'er down to reach some Leftovers - these, when held, restore 1/16 of your max HP per turn.

If you head back north (yes, Leftovers are that important to me), you'll find a Skiddo farm. Enter the house in the northwest part and speak with the person within for TM45. If you run into one of the Skiddos outside, you can ride it. It's pretty fast, and they can hop back and forth over ledges! Go over the one ot the east, then south and west for another. Hop off the Skiddo to find a Whipped Dream or a Sachet - depends on which version, X or Y, you're playing. (That's the seoncd time, too... They want you to evolve those Swirlixes and Spritzees apparently.)

If you go southeast from here, you can hop over the fence and skip a few Trainer battles, just so you know. I don't recommend it, however. Anyways, remember the first ledge you hopped over? Go northeast and east of it to some stairs. Ascend to find a Shiny Stone - it evolves Togetic, Roselia, Minccino, and Floette. If you don't want to skip the battles, return the Skiddo to where it belongs, then go south and east to find a Trainer to battle. Then another. And another!

After beating Foster, ascend to the top of the plateau, then go west and downstairs. Defeat the legendary six-Magikarp trainer - be warned, you'll never fight a harder one! - then grab the Ice Heal hidden to his southwest via the Dowsing Machine. Begin Surfing northward, but hang along the western shore. Eventually, it will curve into the land - follow it to a lone stone, which you can examine for a Water Stone.

If you want to do some additional treasure-hunting in Azure Bay, return to the water and keep a-goin' northward. Otherwise, go back to the epic-fisherman and head east into Coumarine City.




Azure Bay



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Ampharosite [_] Big Pearl [_] Star Piece [_] Deep Sea Scale [_] Deep Sea Tooth [_] TM81 (X-Scissor)
[_] Hyper Potion [_] Dive Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Chatot Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 1 Attack Both
Exeggcute Grass/Psychic Chlorophyll, Harvest 1 Defense Both
Inkay Dark/Psychic Contrary, Suction Cups 1 Attack Both
Slowpoke Water/Psychic Oblvious, Own Tempo, Regenerator 1 HP Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Lapras Water/Ice Shell Armor, Water Absorb, Hydration 2 HP Both
Mantyke Flying/Water Swift Swim, Water Absorb, Water Veil 1 Sp.Def. Both
Tentacool Poison/Water Clear Body, Liquid Ooze, Rain Dish 1 Sp.Def. Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Slowpoke Water/Psychic Oblvious, Own Tempo, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Wingull Water/Flying Keen Eye, Rain Dish 1 Speed Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Swimmer Kieran $432 Remoraid Lv. 27, Wailmer Lv. 27, Skrelp Lv. 27
Swimmer Romy $480 Slowpoke Lv. 30
Fisherman Evan $1,624 Clauncher Lv. 27, Carvanha Lv. 29
Swimmer Isla $432 Corsola Lv. 28, Lanturn Lv. 27
Swimmer Romy $480 Slowpoke Lv. 30

You'll quickly find Kieran as you begin Surfing westard, soon followed by Romy. Go north from there to a small island where you can speak with an old man to get some Ampharosite. This item will allow you to Mega Evolve Ampharos, the final evolution of Mareep. Speak with the Fisherman nearby for a battle, too, of course. Once you're done fileting his fishies, return to Surfing. Go east to the dark water, and north for a bit to find an island with a Big Pearl. Go northeast to find one with a Star Piece, too. 

Return to the Ampharosite dude and, this time, head northeast for a bit to find Isla. Hang west after and follow the water to a fork. Go down at it to find a small area to land on: there, you'll find the Deep Sea Scale and Deep Sea Tooth, items you make Clamperl hold while trading to evolve into Gorebyss and Huntail. Also there is TM81, which teaches the Bug-type move X-Scissor.

Now, return to the Ampharosite guy once more. Go as much due north of his island as you can - if you need to deviate, correct your course ASAP. You'll soon reach an island with a cave. On the island's northeast corner is a Splash Plate - like the others, this boosts Water-type move power and turns Arceus into a Water-type.

Within the cave is just the Sea Spirit's Den. This can be used later on in the post-credits for legendary stuff, but, for now, just leave. Return to Route 12, then go east to Coumarine City.




Coumarine City



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Silk Scarf [_] Good Rod [_] HM02 (Fly) [_] Lucky Egg [_] TM100 (Confide) [_] TM62 (Acrobatics)
[_] TM63 (Embargo) [_] TM92 (Trick Room) [_] Metronome [_] Befriending Power Lv. 1 [_] Poké Toy

COUMARINE CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Quick Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Catch rate is x4.0 in first four battle turns.
Repeat Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Increased catch rate for previously-owned species.
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Timer Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Catch rate goes up by one every ten turns up to x4.0.
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

COUMARINE CITY INCENSE SHOP
Item Name Cost Effect
Full Incense $9,600 Lowers the holder's Speed. Used in breeding Snorlax for Munchlax.
Lax Incense $9,600 Raises the holder's evasion. Used to breed Wobbuffet for Wynaut.
Luck Incense $9,600 Doubles money from Trainer battles if holder participates. Used to breed Chansey/Blissey for Happiny.
Odd Incense $9,600 Boosts Psychic moves' power by 20%. Used to breed Mr. Mime for Mime Jr.
Pure Incense $9,600 Somewhat keeps wild Pokémon away if held by lead Pokémon. Used to breed Chimecho for Chingling.
Rock Incense $9,600 Boosts Rock moves' power by 20%. Used to breed Sudowoodo for Bonsly.
Rose Incense $9,600 Boosts Grass moves' power by 20%. Used to breed Roselia/Roserade for Budew.
Sea Incense $9,600 Boosts Water moves' power by 20%. Used in breeding Marill/Azumarill for Azurill.
Wave Incense $9,600 Boosts Water moves' power by 20%. Used in breeding Mantine for Mantyke.

As you enter town, you'll get a Holo Clip from your rival, challenging you to a battle in front of the Gym. Okay, whatever. If you head east, you'll see a red-and-white-striped stand selling incense, if you want it - some have decent effects, but it's mostly for getting the "baby" Pokémon introduced in Generations II-IV. If you go into the nearby house, you can get a Silk Scarf, boosting the power of Normal moves by 20%, from the elderly man. Continue back outside and speak with the fisherman to the southeast for a Good Rod.

If you head far to the east, you can find Professor Sycamore in the monorail building: he'll hand you HM02. This teaches Fly. It's a powerful two-turn Flying move in battle, and also lets you fly to previous visited areas! Thank God~! After the conversation, go far north to the hotel. Within, go west and speak with the blonde woman to get a Lucky Egg - this hold item boosts the EXP. gained by a Pokémon by 50%. If you upstairs and into the southeastern room, you'll find the Game Director. (What, no Game Freak building?) I suppose he'll hand us the usual diploma when we get it all filled.

... Lame.

If you continue outside and west, you'll find a dude quizzing you about TMs. The question is seemingly random, but he gives off four TM names. Here's how I'd describe them...


  • Confide - The user tells a secret to a target, lowering its Special Attack.
  • Acrobatics - The user attacks the target. It's more powerful if the target holds nothing.
  • Embargo - Prevents item usage.
  • Trick Room - Slower Pokémon move first for five turns.

I suppose he then gives you TM100, TM62, TM63, or TM92 - whatever you name correctly is the one you get. Not many of those are good to me anyways, except Acrobatics - you can get one once daily, though. Anyways, once you're done, return to where you found Sycamore and use the monorail. Speak with one guy on the other side of the train to get the Metronome item, which makes moves used consecutively more powerful.

Once outside, feel free to use the Pokémon Center nearby. Within is Mr. Bonding, the dude in pink, now giving you the Befriending Power Lv. 1. ... Does he just camp out waiting for us? It's kinda creepy... Well, shop up and heal up - take note that Ultra Balls are now being sold! But Quick Balls and Timer Balls are better! (And I had $115,000. Yay me!)

Let's see... If you go west to the intersection, south, and then into the easternmost house, you can listen to a new theme song by speaking with the purple-haired man. Trust me, it's absolutely worth it. *_* You can also speak with the woman upstairs: if you guess which Pokémon in your party she mimics (it's a dead give-away if it's Pikachu, and yes, it's possible! lol) you'll get a Poké Toy. It basically allows you to get out of battle instantly.

Once you're healed and ready, go north of there to find the Gym. Don't enter yet - go east and north around it to find a Sky Plate - it boosts Flying moves' power and turns Arceus into a Flying type. (Plus, look at the view!) Now try to enter the Gym and you'll fight your rival.


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $3,300

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 32 N/A
Absol Dark Level 31 N/A
Braixen Fire Level 33 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Quilladen Grass Level 33 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Frogadier Water Level 33 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this 'un. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psybeam for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug.

  • Braixen: This Pokémon is weak to Ground, Water, and Rock. It can use Fire Spin for extra damage on Steel, Grass, Ice, and Bug; there's also Psybeam for extra on Poison and Fighting. Fire Spin could also burn you and it's multi-turn.

  • Quilladen: This starter is weak to Ice, Flying, Fire, Bug, and Poison. It'll have a type-based advantage over Ground, Rock, and Water.

  • Frogadier: To make this Pokémon croak, you'll want to use Grass and Electric before its Water-type moves drown your Fire-, Rock-, and Ground-types. Not much notable, though.

This battle will be pretty easy - I mean, she used this last party time. -_- Just mimic what you did before and abuse types for the most part. Feel free to pull out your Mega Kanto Starter out on her Poké's, though - it's only fair, right? >:)


Anyways, after that ridiculous battle - seriously, your rivals are generally harder than this - heal up at the Pokémon Center and re-enter the Gym.



Coumarine City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM86 (Grass Knot) [_] Grass Badge

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Pokémon Ranger Chaise $2,560 Simisage Lv. 32
Pokémon Ranger Maurice $2,320 Ferroseed Lv. 29, Carnivine Lv. 29, Lombre Lv. 29
Pokémon Ranger Brooke $2,400 Roselia Lv. 30, Wormadam Lv. 30
Pokémon Ranger Twiggy $2,480 Gloom Lv. 29, Exeggutor Lv. 31

Yeah, it's a Grass-type Gym on the shoreline of Kalos. =/ Either way, in addition to bringing the obvious Fire- or Flying-types (or Fire/Flying, in Fletchinder's case), be sure to bring that Amulet Coin - the basic trainers alone could get you $20,000+. $_$

Here, when you stand on those footprint-marked areas, press the A Button to go up the vine or across the net or whatever. Climb up the first vine, then jump across the net to the right. Defeat Chaise. Go up the next vine and cross the next two nets. Climb up the vine at the end and cross the net to the right to (optionally) fight Maurice. Otherwise, go left across the net, down the vine, and left to another Ranger. Climb up the vine after beating Brooke, then cross the net, climb a vine, go right two nets, and fight the final Ranger here, Twiggy. (Heh.)

After, climb up the nearby vine, jump over a net and another to reach your Gym Leader. Burn it all down!


BOSS: Gym Leader Ramos

  • Rewards: $5,440; TM86 (Grass Knot); Grass Badge

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Jumpluff Grass/Flying Level 30 N/A
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Level 31 N/A
Gogoat Grass Level 34 N/A

  • Jumpluff: This Pokémon is weak to Ice (4x), Fire, Poison, and Flying, and is immune to Ground. It doesn't do much annoying. However, if you're bringing something like Blaziken that has an advantage over this but a weakness to Flying, be sure to hold SOME sort of item: Jumpluff knows Acrobatics, which will probably kill you if not holding something.

  • Weepinbell: He is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic. This guy didn't seem to do much of direct offensive against me - I would presume the knowledge of Grass moves, which hurt Water, Rock, and Ground. But all I saw was Poison Powder. =/

  • Gogoat: Perhaps the simplest of the group ... superficially. While he is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Poison, and Bug, he knows Bulldoze - it's Ground-type to quickly get rid of the Fire- and Poison-types. Fair warning.

This will be easy enough: being Grass-type alone leaves you prone to five weaknesses. You could probably bring in your Fire starter(s) (or Firestarter), the Pokémon you want to use Fly with, Lapras from Route 12 (yeah, he'll manage), all of which are pretty good. Ideally, you'll have something Fire/Flying - that kind of Pokémon will absolutely dominate: none of these have something to combat that. Sure, Gogoat can combat Fire, but not the Flying Ground is noneffective against. So, basically, Charizard, Fletchinder, and Talonflame are the best of the best here. But anything that'll kill 'em works well.


After the battle, you'll receive the Grass Badge - this allows traded Pokémon up to Level 60 to obey you. It also makes Fly usable outside of battle. Then there's TM86 - it is Grass Knot, a Grass-type move that is more powerful on heavier Pokémon.

Take the slide to get outta here! And congrats on passing the halfway mark - that's your fourth Badge!



Voltage Badge



Sectional Flowchart






Leaving Coumarine - Route 13



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Black Sludge [_] Mountain Kalos Pokédex [_] Next Ball [_] Smooth Rock [_] X Accuracy [_] Guard Spec.
[_] Star Piece [_] Heat Rock [_] PP Up [_] TM57 (Charge Beam) [_] Burn Heal [_] Sun Stone
[_] Flame Plate [_] Power Plant Pass

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN MOUNDS OF DIRT
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Dugtrio Ground Arena Trap, Sand Veil, Sand Force 2 Speed Both
Gible Ground/Dragon Sand Veil, Rough Skin 1 Attack Both
Trapinch Ground Arena Trap, Hyper Cutter, Sheer Force 1 Attack Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Graveler Ground/Rock Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Slugma Fire Flame Body, Magma Armor, Weak Armor 1 Sp.Atk. Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $1,320 Houndoom Lv. 31, Golbat Lv. 33

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: For what little it has, Route 13 isn't all that bad. If you still don't have a decent Fire-type, Slugma may work out well enough for you so long as you don't let it evolve (it then becomes doubly weak to both Ground and Water). However, the main feature are the numerous Ground-types - our next Gym is of the Electric type, a type solely weak to Ground, even to the point that Electric is nulled on Ground! Short-term players will probably desire Dugtrio: he doesn't have any significant type changes as he goes (he's already fully-evolved) and can learn a nice few Ground moves. Those wanting a long-term Ground Pokémon will probably want to toss their hopes in Trapinch - he later evolves into the Ground/Dragon Flygon at Level 45, which is good enough for taking Dragons down in addition to Electric, Fire, Rock, Steel, and Poison. He also can learn a slightly better variety of Ground moves versus Garchomp, Gabite's final evolution.

POKÉMON EVOLUTION: As a rather important note, if you bring a Nosepass or Magneton here and level it up, it evolves. This is important because, in previous games, they evolved in areas that had some kind of electromagnetic anomaly, like Mt. Sinnoh in Diamond/Pearl/Platinum, or Chargestone Cave in Black/White. All you need to do is bring them to the exterior portion of the route outside of the Power Plant and level them up. Trust me, it confused the crap out of me for a while. >_>

After taking the Plant Badge from Ramos, go down the slide near him and leave the Coumarine Gym. Head south for a bit and you'll get a Holo Clip from Lysandre. Continue into the gatehouse and speak with the second person on the left to obtain a Black Sludge - it Poisons the Pokémon holding it (note that you can use Trick to make the opponent hold it!), and, if the Pokémon is a Poison-type, the poisoning heals them. Anyhow, continue onto Route 13 proper - you'll get the Mountain Kalos Pokédex upgrade on the way.

Here on Route 13, mounds of dirt randomly appear and chase you to begin Pokémon encounters. Go west of the lighter dirt path using the Dowsing Machine to find a Nest Ball. Then Roller Skate east (be sure to go quickly!) onto the rail to find a Smooth Rock on the other side. This item lengthens Sandstorms initiated by the holder's move Sandstorm for about two extra turns. Get back on the other side of the rail and head south with the Dowsing Machine to find an X Accuracy, west-northwest for a Guard Spec., then northwest for a Star Piece and Heat Rock south of the big rail. (The latter item lengthens the holder's Sunny Day by about two turns.)

Go fast and over the rail, then the next one. Examine the rock nearby for the always-useful PP Up! Smash the nearby rock with ... well, Rock Smash, then go along the path. At the "+"-shaped intersection, examine the rock at the left for a Hyper Potion, then continue southward and along the path. You'll eventually get to the yellow Pokéball denoting TM57. TM57 teaches Charge Beam, a 50-Power Electric move that can raise the user's Special Attack. Backtrack now to the rock where the PP Up was (assuming you could move at all). Hop across the nearby ledge, then go south for a while. DO NOT pass over the second ledge; rather, smash the rock next to it so you can grab a Burn Heal.

Then hop over the ledge. Go southeast to find a rail - run into it quickly and go southeast on the other side. Go down into the trench and you'll find a Sun Stone. Get out of the trench and go south and west to get on the other side of the rail. Go far east to the southeast corner and you'll see an item in the distance: line up with it and move towards this Flame Plate - it boosts Fire moves' power and makes Arceus a Fire-type. Go back to the rail and north-northwest on the other side using the Dowsing Machine to locate a Power Plant Pass. Cross west and defeat the Team Flare Grunt, then go north and into the building behind him.




Kalos Power Plant



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Zap Plate [_] Full Restore x2 [_] Magnet [_] TM43 (Flare Charge)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $1,280 Scraggy Lv. 32, Croagunk Lv. 32
Team Flare Grunt $1,320 Croagunk Lv. 31, Golbat Lv. 33
Team Flare Grunt $1,360 Mightyena Lv. 34
Team Flare Grunt $1,280 Scraggy Lv. 32, Golbat Lv. 32
Team Flare Grunt $1,280 Golbat Lv. 32, Mightyena Lv. 32
Team Flare Grunt $1,360 Swalot Lv. 34
Team Flare Grunt $1,320 Liepard Lv. 31, Swalot Lv. 33
Team Flare Grunt $1,240 Croagunk Lv. 31, Scraggy Lv. 31, Liepard Lv. 31
Team Flare Admin $2,880 Houndoom Lv. 36
Team Flare Aliana $5,320 Mightyena Lv. 38

Walk along the long hall into the next area. As you continue north, you'll find what I suspect to be a rather "odd" member of Team Flare. Whatever the case, he decides to battle you and, per the bad guy stereotype, reveals (all we really need to know of) Team Flare's plans here. In the room to the right, a dude will sell you Fresh Waters (heal 50 HP) for $300 each. ... No. Just ... no. To the right, in the alcove next to the man who got stuck (lol), you'll find a Zap Plate - like the others, it boosts the power of Electric moves as well as turns Arceus into an Electric type. How shoc -- *gunshot* 

Return to the hallway and head west and north, to where the Grunt (not the sound, of course) came from. You'll find another Grunt before reaching the next area.

Well... It's a big room, I guess. As you go north, a Grunt comes by to battle you. After, he won't move aside, and Game Freak decided it was too violent for us to push him into the electric currents below. ... Go west and along the lengthy, linear, hexagonal path, defeating a number of Grunts on the way. After the one leading off with Croagunk, don't go southwest (unless you want to find the unbudging Team Flare Grunt again - what?) - go west and up the stairs. Defeat the Admin and Aliana at the top - they're easy to beat, especially with Fighting-type Pokémon.

After, some masked superher-- Oh, never mind, it's obviously that stalking duo of Sycamore's. Your Pokémon will get fully healed by them, and you'll also get two Full Restores. (They're like a Full Heal that also restores your HP completely - save them for dire situations!) Apparently, Route 13 and Lumiose City are reconnected, so yay. Backtrack on out of here (even the persistent Team Flare Grunt left!).

As you do so, visit the hostages again. There, you can get a Magnet (boosts Electric moves' power), Fresh Waters for $100 each (somewhat a good deal), and TM43 (teaches Flame Charge, a decent Fire-type move). Okay, then, get on outta here.




More on Route 13



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Stardust [_] Rare Candy

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN MOUNDS OF DIRT
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Dugtrio Ground Arena Trap, Sand Veil, Sand Force 2 Speed Both
Gible Ground/Dragon Sand Veil, Rough Skin 1 Attack Both
Trapinch Ground Arena Trap, Hyper Cutter, Sheer Force 1 Attack Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Graveler Ground/Rock Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Slugma Fire Flame Body, Magma Armor, Weak Armor 1 Sp.Atk. Both

^sr18|

Once back in the nice, fresh, desert (and probably cold-as-hell given it's 2:00 AM for me) air, go back across the bridge, then east along the southern part of the area. Once you pass the winding rail, you'll see that the stairs have opened. Use them and you'll find a mysterious trainer, speaking of a flower Pokémon that gives eternal life... ...?

Annnnnnyway, go southeast. See that small path going off to the side? Run along it and smash the rocks with Rock Smash. In the alcove south of the first, press A while facing south for a Stardust. Past the second rock, you can find a Rare Candy! ^_^ (In case you don't know, Rare Candies level-up your Pokémon automatically. However, they reach the next level with 0 EXP. put towards the one after, so they're most effective just after leveling up.) Return back west and go south through the gatehouse to Lumiose City.




Northern Lumiose City & Lumiose City Gym


MAJOR GAME-BREAKING GLITCH NOTE: PLEASE READ!

It has been reported, in multiple releases of Pokémon X and Y, that there is a game-breaking glitch in Lumiose City, particularly regarding saving. Reports indicate that saving in the outside areas (i.e. not buildings) and later reloading these files may cause your game to glitch up. Some are mild and fixable under the proper circumstances - for example, some people have gotten stuck in people and solved it by simply Flying/Teleporting elsewhere. Other times, the game literally hangs before you can input commands, forcing you to delete your save file by hand and begin anew. There are no reports of problems when saving inside buildings (such as the Pokémon Center) and no problems known to occur by saving outside of Lumiose City (i.e. Route 4).

There is a patch to this glitch currently available, for free, on the Nintendo eShop - once downloaded, it will fix the glitch. (Note that there are patches individually made for Pokémon X and Pokémon Y - download the one for *your* game.) If you are currently experiencing certain effects from the glitch - such as being stuck in something - this will be corrected. The patch takes approximately 227 blocks to download. If you have no internet/Wi-Fi connection with which to download this, then, do not save outside of a building in Lumiose City - otherwise, you will be fine.


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Voltage Badge [_] TM24 (Thunderbolt)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Schoolboy Arno $1,088 Pachirisu Lv. 34
Schoolboy Sherlock $1,088 Stunfisk Lv. 34
Schoolboy Finnian $1,088 Dedenne Lv. 34
Rising Star Estel $2,100 Raichu Lv. 35
Rising Star Nelly $2,100 Magneton Lv. 35
Rising Star Helene $2,100 Manectric Lv. 35
Ace Trainer Mathis $3,600 Lanturn Lv. 36
Ace Trainer Maxim $3,600 Electrode Lv. 36
Ace Trainer Rico $3,600 Ampharos Lv. 36
Poké Fan Abigail $2,720 Minun Lv. 34
Poké Fan Lydie $2,720 Plusle Lv. 34
Poké Fan Tara $2,720 Pikachu Lv. 34

Yeah, that's all one Gym.

Anyways, as you enter the northern side of Lumiose, Shauna will come up behind you, asking if you know who turned the power back on. Feel free to tell her the truth, or not, no one really cares. The Eif-- I mean the Prism Tower will be lit up according to Shauna pretty soon - go towards it (you can't really miss it). There, you'll find it to be the Lumiose Pokémon Gym. Eh, might as well get it over with.

Inside, go up the first elevator. The Lumiose City Gym is a quiz-based Gym, a sort of staple since the early days of Pokémon. Approach the podium to be given your first question: you'll need to identify the Pokémon silhouette. The first one is Pikachu, so for door three. Note, however, I recommend going for the other two Trainers first for extra EXP. and money - you'll have to battle the third one regardless.

You've got the general idea now, right? For the second quiz, the answer is Fletchling, so go for the first door this time. As for the third, we'll find Panpour: door number three! For our fourth quiz, it's a bit trickier: in order, you are shown Butterfree, Vivillon, and Mothim and told to figure which is Vivillon. (It's the second one.) This will take to the top, where you'll battle again Clemont.


BOSS: Gym Leader Clemont

  • Rewards: $5,920; Voltage Badge; TM24 (Thunderbolt)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Emolga Electric/Flying Level 35 N/A
Magneton Electric/Steel Level 35 N/A
Heliolisk Electric/Normal Level 37 N/A

  • Emolga: Ironically, we have an Electric-type NOT weak to Ground; rather, it is immune to Ground and weak to Rock and Ice. Beware its Static ability if you use contact moves! It, like in Black/White, is perhaps the most annoying Pokémon of the group because it can use Volt Switch to hit you, then switch to another Pokémon. (If it switches to Magneton and you used a Rock/Ice move, that's not good for you.) It also knows the powerful Thunderbolt and Aerial Ace (Flying and no-miss). Definitely the toughest of the group...

  • Magneton: And, of course, we'd also have one DOUBLY weak to Ground for quadruple damage. O_o He's also weak to Fire and Fighting, and immune to Poison (status and type). Keep in mind its numerous resistances due to being part-Steel when fighting - other than the named, Water, Ghost, and Dark are the only ones now able to inflict damage greater than or equal to the norm. Like all of Clemont's Pokémon, it primarily features the move Thunderbolt, but that's the only notable one. He does have the Sturdy ability, which means one-hit-kills are not possible, plus the Hyper Potions being used makes this particular Pokémon live for four turns; he likes to lead with Electric Terrain to boost up Electric moves' power, so be sure to keep a high level of health after this point.

  • Heliolisk: They put a lot of Normal-and-somethin's in this game, huh? Anyways, this Pokémon is weak to Fighting and Ground, and immune to Ghost. Again, like Magneton, its only notable move would be Thunderbolt.

Strategically, you won't have a free ride in this fight just because you come with a Ground-type. Granted, if you do, you take out a lot of the work in that most of the moves won't hit you, or at least hard enough to matter. If you bring along a Rock/Ground or Steel/Ground type, then you'll probably never get hit for normal damage, either.

With Emolga, you'll want to stick something out that can use Ice- or Rock-type moves, and be sure it's your lead Pokémon before the battle: Emolga, despite being the lowest level of the group, is the most annoying. Lapras is not one to send out unless you're certain of a OHKO - rather, I sent Aurorus. Magneton and Heliosk are much easier. If you have that aforementioned Ground-type, go ahead and send 'im on out. The Fighting-type you may have used way-back-when is also a good idea, since both are weak to Fighting. In the end, it's a pretty easy battle once Emolga is grounded and if you can keep nearly one-hitting Magneton to drain Clemont's Hyper Potions.


After the battle, you'll earn the Voltage Badge! This badge makes traded Pokémon up to Level 70 obey you. You'll also receive TM24. TM24 teaches Thunderbolt, a move of 90 Power and 100 base Accuracy that could Paralyze the target - it's a must-have for any Electric-type you have! (For the record, I typed the stats for it before Bonnie said it. But, she's wrong in that it can miss, especially if you're hit with Sand Attack or something.)

Go on back down.



Fairy Badge



Sectional Flowchart






Exploring Lumiose City


MAJOR GAME-BREAKING GLITCH NOTE: PLEASE READ!

It has been reported, in multiple releases of Pokémon X and Y, that there is a game-breaking glitch in Lumiose City, particularly regarding saving. Reports indicate that saving in the outside areas (i.e. not buildings) and later reloading these files may cause your game to glitch up. Some are mild and fixable under the proper circumstances - for example, some people have gotten stuck in people and solved it by simply Flying/Teleporting elsewhere. Other times, the game literally hangs before you can input commands, forcing you to delete your save file by hand and begin anew. There are no reports of problems when saving inside buildings (such as the Pokémon Center) and no problems known to occur by saving outside of Lumiose City (i.e. Route 4).

There is a patch to this glitch currently available, for free, on the Nintendo eShop - once downloaded, it will fix the glitch. (Note that there are patches individually made for Pokémon X and Pokémon Y - download the one for *your* game.) If you are currently experiencing certain effects from the glitch - such as being stuck in something - this will be corrected. The patch takes approximately 227 blocks to download. If you have no internet/Wi-Fi connection with which to download this, then, do not save outside of a building in Lumiose City - otherwise, you will be fine.


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM82 (Dragon Tail) [_] Bargain Power Lv. 1 [_] $2,000 [_] $2,000 [_] $2,000 [_] TM49 (Echoed Voice)
[_] Prism Scale [_] Expert Belt [_] Protein [_] Heal Ball x3 [_] Destiny Knot [_] Elixir
[_] King's Rock

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Garçon Jacopo $600 Gabite Lv. 30
Waitress Paget $600 Kirlia Lv. 30
Chef Kamaboko $600 Pidgeotto Lv. 30
Owner Toro $600 Diggersby Lv. 30
Punk Girl Lillian $600 Krokorok Lv. 30
Beauty Aimee $680 Fletchinder Lv. 34
Beauty Anais $680 Seadra Lv. 34
Black Belt Killian $600 Machoke Lv. 30

LUIMOSE CITY POKÉMART - GENERAL
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Heal Ball $300 Catches Pokémon. Its catch rate is x1.0. Pokémon are healed on capture: useless with full party.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Nest Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Its better than normal on lower-level Pokémon.
Net Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Its catch rate is x4.0 on Bug or Water Pokémon.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Quick Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Catch rate is x4.0 in first four battle turns.
Repeat Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Increased catch rate for previously-owned species.
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Timer Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Catch rate goes up by one every ten turns up to x4.0.
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

LUMIOSE CITY POKÉMART - TMs
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Bulldoze (TM78) $10,000 Ground Physical 20 60 100 All Lowers Speed
Rain Dance (TM18) $50,000 Water Status 20 - - Field Makes it Rainy (5 turns)
Struggle Bug (TM76) $10,000 Bug Special 20 50 100 One Lowers Sp.Atk.
Sunny Day (TM11) $50,000 Fire Status 5 - - Field Makes it Sunny (5 turns)
Swords Dance (TM75) $10,000 Normal Status 20 - - User Raises Attack

LUMIOSE CITY - POKÉ MILEAGE EXCHANGE (POKÉMON CENTER)
Item Name Cost Effect
Berry Juice 10 mi. Heals 20 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Moomoo Milk 20 mi. Heals 100 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Full Heal 30 mi. Heals all non-stat-affecting ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Max Repel 35 mi. Prevents most random encounters for 250 steps.
Hyper Potion 60 mi. Heals 200 HP to a Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Ultra Ball 60 mi. Captures Pokémon. It's base catch rate is x2.0.
Ether 120 mi. Restores 10 PP to one move on one Pokémon in the field or in battle.
Max Potion 125 mi. Refills a Pokémon's HP in the field or in battle completely.
Full Restore 300 mi. Fully restores HP and status ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Max Revive 400 mi. Revive a Pokémon from KO with full HP (not ~50% like usual).
Rare Candy 500 mi. The Pokémon levels up! (Won't work if at Level 100.)
PP Up 1,000 mi. Boosts one move's maximum PP by 20% of its usual base value.

LUMIOSE CITY - STONE EMPORIUM
Item Name Cost Effect
Kanto Starter Mega Stone $500,000 Made for the Kanto starter stronger to yours; lets it Mega Evolve.
Fire Stone $2,100 Evolves Vulpix, Growlithe, Eevee, and Pansear.
Leaf Stone $2,100 Evolves Gloom, Weepinbell, Exeggcute, Nuzleaf, and Pansage.
Water Stone $2,100 Evolves Poliwhirl, Shellder, Staryu, Eevee, Lombre, and Panpour.

LUMIOSE CITY - HERBORISTE
Item Name Cost Effect
Energy Powder $500 Heals 50 HP to a Pokémon. Also lowers their Happiness.
Energy Root $800 Heals 200 HP to a Pokémon. Greatly lowers their Happiness.
Heal Powder $450 Heals all ailments (except KO and Pokérus). Lowers Happiness.
Revival Herb $2,800 Revives from KO with full HP. Greatly lowers the target's Happiness.

LUMIOSE CITY - POKÉBALL BOUTIQUE
Item Name Cost Catch Rate Special Rate Special Conditions/Notes
Dive Ball $1,000 x1.0 x4.0 Used on Pokémon living underwater
Dusk Ball $1,000 x1.0 x4.0 Used at night or in caves
Heal Ball $300 x1.0 Heals Pokémon fully on capture: useless if party is full
Luxury Ball $1,000 x1.0 Makes Pokémon Happier quicker
Nest Ball $1,000 x1.0 x1.1+ Better on lower-level Pokémon
Net Ball $1,000 x1.0 x4.0 Used on Water- or Bug-type Pokémon
Quick Ball $1,000 x1.0 x4.0 Used in first four turns
Premier Ball $200 x1.0 N/A - just normally found by buying 10 Poké Balls
Repeat Ball $1,000 x1.0 x4.0 (?) Used on previously-caught Pokémon
Timer Ball $1,000 x1.0 x2.0, x3.0, x4.0 Catch rate +1 up to x4.0 every ten turns

Since we're still here in Lumiose and all, I don't see why we shouldn't explore everything. Anyways, as you leave the Gym, you'll get a Holo Clip from Sycamore, asking you to meet him in the Lysandre Cafe. For now, ignore him.

Let's get our bearings first. Try to get to the northernmost portion of the city, on North Boulevard. From the black building there, you'll be able to see the Prism Tower. Head counterclockwise around the city to the next gatehouse, to Route 14 from where you came earlier. We'll start here. Go into the next building on the north side if you want to look at art. There are some interesting pictures there for series veterans, including Mr. Briney's ship from Ruby/Sapphire/Emerald, a picture of Shaymin, another of Mew, the Battle Frontier from Pokémon Platinum, Castelia City from Pokémon Black/White and their sequels, and numerous others... On the lower first floor, you can also get TM82, which teaches Dragon Tail: it does Dragon damage and ejects the opponent from battle, ending wild battles or forcing a random switch in Trainer battles.

Outside, across the street is a Pokémon Center on your right. Continue down the street on the opposite side to find a woman out front speaking of "Beauty and the Beast". Heh. In that building, you can get the Bargain Power Lv. 1 from Mr. Bonding. You can also try to get a job here for some money! $2,000 is for perfect Room Service (just remember the order), $2,000 for making all of the beds in under 75 seconds (there are four; just examine them to make 'em), and $2,000 for lost-and-found (just walk all over, pressing A before you step). You only get to do each once, though, so don't screw it up! (This all is doable once a day.) In the southeast room of 2F, you can get some indirect Pokémon trivia (40th wedding anniversary is Ruby, and 45th is Sapphire - get it?). On 5F, in the southeast bathroom, you can speak with the girl for TM49 (Echoed Voice). You can also find a Furfrou who ... Agh, figure it out yourself. ;)

Outside of the hotel, go into the next building down the street and head to the top floor. Speak with the person to the south to get a Prism Scale. In the café across the street, you can get a Training Ribbon for "muscular" Pokémon - it worked only on my Pikachu, who had cleared all 30 Super Training regimens. Past the intersect a ways down the street is the Battle Institute, but it's not open until after beating the Elite Four. Not a lot down the street are two Skiddo - the story basically is that they were abandoned by their trainer years ago, but are still here, loyally waiting for him. Aw... ;_;

Nearby is Lumiose Station, although there's nothing really there. Continue into the next area, South Boulevard, but there's nothing new. If you return to the Route 14 gatehouse and go the other way, in the next building, you can go to the second floor for some really freaky ****. o_o;; On the top floor, you can get the Expert Belt (powers up supereffective moves) and a Protein (Attack EVs +10) by speaking with people on the right. (For the record, on the left is a fighting/dance studio by some guy from Kanto who couldn't get his fighting dojo there to work out. Sound familiar?)

Further down the street is little else but the Route 13 gatehouse. So, head down Autumnal Avenue next. There, on the left is the Pokéball Boutique. One person within will hand you three Heal Balls for liking round things. Be sure to shop up well!! Just down the street is another battle restaurant, this one specializing in Triple Battles. ^_^ Further along is the Juice Shoppe - you can make juice by using your own Berries, or by buying random selections.

Across the street is an alleyway taking you to Magenta Plaza, where a third Pokémon Center lies. O_o (One of those within notes that Blue, Professor Oak's grandson from Pokémon Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, FireRed, or LeafGreen - whichever you just love - is here in Kalos, still saying "Smell ya later!" Ah, yo-- Well, it's been 18 years, kinda hard to call it youth.) You can continue into Estival Plaza via a similar alleyway.

Here, across the street and a building to the north, you'll find the Loto-ID Center. Like every Pokémon game, you can draw a number and see if it matches an ID that your file has been registered with (in other words, yours and anyone's you've traded with) - the more matches, the better the prize. A bit up the street (towards the boulevards), there is an alley on the left leading to a trainer battle. Get out and use the alleys towards the center to now go to Bleu Plaza.

In Bleu Plaza, head along the outer edge to find Waitress Paget (if you went counterclockwise). Go past her after to find a small alley - on the left is a smaller alley with a cook to battle at the end. Return to Bleu Plaza and go to the alley opposite yours, then speak with the man within for another battle. Head through the alleys to Vernal Avenue - you were here before, so keep going to Vert Plaza.

Go clockwise around the plaza to find a Punk Girl in an alley to beat. In the nearby cafe, you can find a half-baked poet and a person who'll change clothes to simulate the last person you battled. You can also give a tip to a Furfrou. ... ... ? Further down the alley is a Beauty wanting to battle. Listen to her story and she'll also give a Destiny Knot. ... Geez, is this entire avenue filled with crazy people!? Furfrous wanting money, people pasting Pokémon terminology into poems, and people falling madly in love with posters - I mean, really!?

Continue along into the next plaza, Jaune Plaza. There, in the next alley clockwise, you can go left into another alley for another Beauty battle. She'll give you an Elixir for winning (heals 10 PP to all moves for a Pokémon). The next avenue from Jaune Plaza, Hibernal, has a restaurant you can enter when you beat the Elite Four. Next door to it, you can run along an alley and take a right to battle a dude.

Now, head to Magenta Plaza - it had a Pokémon Center near it - and you'll find the Lysandre Café. (You can take a cab there, too, for $710.) Within, you can inadvertantly learn a few facts of Lysandre if you pay attention (at least, I will suppose such - I don't really know yet =P) and the legend of the Kalos legendary Pokémon. You'll get a King's Rock before you can leave. Trevor will call outside, telling you everyone's meeting on Route 14. Heal up (rival battle is coming!) and head out that way - remember, it's on North Boulevard. If you're lost, just go find a cab.




Route 14



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Rare Candy [_] Super Potion [_] Tiny Mushroom [_] Cleanse Tag [_] Big Mushroom [_] Roselia Berry
[_] TM61 (Will-O-Wisp) [_] Hyper Potion [_] Revive [_] Spell Tag [_] TM06 (Toxic) [_] Damp Rock

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND PUDDLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Carnivine Grass Levitate 2 Attack Both
Goomy Dragon Sap Sipper, Hydration, Gooey 1 Sp.Def. Both
Haunter Ghost/Poison Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Karrablast Bug Shed Skin, Swarm, No Guard 1 Attack Both
Quagsire Water/Ground Damp, Water Absorb, Unaware 2 HP Both
Shelmet Bug Hydration, Shell Armor, Overcoat 1 Defense Both
Skorupi (Grass-only) Bug/Poison Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
Stunfisk (Puddles-only) Ground/Electric Limber, Static, Sand Veil 2 HP Both
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Bellsprout Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 1 Attack Both
Ekans Poison Intimidate, Shed Skin, Unnerve 1 Attack Both
Skorupi Poison/Bug Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Goomy Dragon Sap Sipper, Hydration, Gooey 1 Sp.Def. Both
Quagsire Water/Ground Damp, Water Absorb, Unaware 2 HP Both
Stunfisk Ground/Electric Limber, Static, Sand Veil 2 HP Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Barboach Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 1 HP Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Pokémon Ranger Melina $2,960 Arbok Lv. 35, Pyroar Lv. 37
Pokémon Ranger Nash $3,040 Goomy Lv. 38
Hex Maniac Anina $1,088 Litwick Lv. 34, Haunter Lv. 34
Pokémon Ranger Reed $2,880 Poliwhirl Lv. 35, Fraxure Lv. 36, Loudred Lv. 34
Fairy Tale Girl Imogem $1,120 Floette Lv. 33, Slurpuff Lv. 35

WEATHER - RAINING

On Route 14, the weather is regularly of the Raining scenario on a permanent basis during battle unless other moves/abilities are used to alter it. (It's not always raining, though.) When it rains, Fire is weakened while Water is strengthened. Abilities like Rain Dish and Dry Skin will take effect, and the Electric-type move Thunder will not miss its target. Fair warning!

(Goomy also uses Rain Dance in battle at times, by the way.)


POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: On a general note, they all could be a lot better - you almost certainly will not find any Pokémon to help significantly in our next Gym (a Fairy-centric one) or those to help in the long-term. Quagsire is defensively good - only weak to Grass, but that's doubled, and immune to Electric - but his stats are barely average without significant EV training. He can be taught some TMs to give him a decent move variety - he can notably get Sludge Wave, Ice Beam, Blizzard, and Sludge Bomb, among others, to combat Grass-types, but we don't have those yet. He would make a decent HM slave for Surf, Strength, and Waterfall, though... I have a similar mindset about Stunfisk - although he's statistically weaker, and weak to Water and Ice, the latter of which is barely tenable in prevention.

As you arrive, you'll be called over by your rival and Trevor. Trevor, as usual, will compare Mountain Kalos 'Dexes with you. ... I only had 16, and he still lost!? Yeah, good luck with that, Pokédex Master... Anyhow, your rival also feels like battlin'. Far be it for me to decline.


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $3,700

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 35 N/A
Absol Dark Level 35 N/A
Delphox Fire/Psychic Level 37 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Greninja Water/Dark Level 37 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Chesnaught Grass/Fighting Level 37 Your Kalos starter is Froakie

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this Pokémon. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psybeam for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug.

  • Delphox: She finally has evolved her starters, huh... Anyways, Delphox is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark. Its moves give it an advantage over Steel, Ice, Grass, Bug, Poison, and Fighting. Do note that Psychic cannot hit Dark.

  • Greninja: As for Greninja, this is probably a little problematic for those of you who chose Fennekin. (Poor me!) It is weak to Grass, Electric, Fighting, Bug, and Fairy, and is immune to Psychic. It will have type-based advantages over Ground, Fire, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic.

  • Chesnaught: Finally, Chesnaught would be the easiest of the starters. It is doubly-weak to Flying, as weak as being weak to Fire, Ice, Poison, Psychic, and Fairy. Its moves give it advantages over Ground, Rock, Water, Normal, Ice, Steel, and Dark. Note, however, Fighting cannot hit Ghost, and most Ghosts are paired with the Steel, Fire, or Poison types, so that's really helpful.

This battle will start off easily enough: as usual, your rival has yet to deviate from the standard Absol/Meowstic combo: maybe better in Double Battles, but easy enough to take care of here. You'll probably want to just lead off with your starter, since it should be able to one-hit those two.

Your rival's starter will be the main problem. By design in Pokémon X/Y, the fully-evolved starters have two type advantages over each other - Delphox's Fire/Psychic beats Chesnaught's Grass/Fighting (Fire over Grass, Psychic over Fighting); Chesnaught's Grass/Fighting beats Greninja's Water/Dark (Grass over Water, Fighting over Dark); and Greninja's Water/Dark beats Delphox's Fire/Psychic (Water over Fire, Dark over Psychic). Interesting fact, no? Regardless, that further implies the idea that you should under no circumstances use your Kalos starter in this battle.

However, your Kanto starter is a different problem, especially with the whole Mega Evolution thing. If it's Venusaur, it beats Greninja (and Delphox if it knows Earthquake, or Chesnaught with Sludge Bomb); if you have Charizard, it beats off Chesnaught hands down; and with Blastoise, you'll beat Delphox. So long as you didn't match up your Kalos and Kanto starter types, you'll have a good enough shot here, especially with Mega Evolutions. Those who participated in the Torchic event at the game's launch may also have Blaziken, who's good on Chesnaught and Greninja, as well as Delphox if you teach it, say, Rock Tomb, Shadow Claw, or Dig via TM.


After the slaughter, Shauna recommends heading on to the scary house near Laverre. ... I wonder if we'll ever battle her? Plus, the music here kinda reminds me of Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon. *rambles*

Anyways, after the battle, be sure to look around the northeast corner of the playground for a Rare Candy. Then go into the patch of dirt of the west and use the Dowsing Machine to find a Super Potion. Go north onto the main part of Route 14 - you'll see a large puddle with a fallen tree as you enter - examine the east side of the tree for a Tiny Mushroom. Go east through some grass, then north through a puddle to find a Cleanse Tag - if held by the lead Pokémon, it's supposed to lessen the encounter rate for lower-level Pokémon, but it rarely works for me. >_>

Return to the tree and go west to find a Pokémon Ranger to battle. Further to the west is a path going north. First go south into the deep water and around to find a Big Mushroom. (No, you cannot eat it to become Super Mario.) Then use that path to soon encounter another Pokémon Ranger. Then go north and east to find a Hex Maniac (and Maniac of possibly those Mushrooms?) to fight. Go north and through the grass to another marshy part of the area: to the north, Ranger Reed is circling some tree stumps, so battle him.

Head northeast and into the forested area to battle a Fairy Tale Girl. To the east, you can pick up a Roseli Berry (it reduces damage taken from supereffective Fairy attacks). Go south from there by Cutting down the tree to find TM61 - it teaches Will-O-Wisp, which serves to Burn the target Pokémon, reducing their Attack and making them lose 1/8 of their HP each turn. Head back into the water and west along the south side of the trees to find a red bulbous ... thing. Examine it to find that it is (probably) a Pokéball submerged in water containing a Hyper Potion.

If you go to the northern landmass and west, you can find the haunted place everyone was talking about. You'll be forced inside. After listening to a "heart-wrenching", "pulse-pounding" tale, you'll be ... forced to pay? Yeeeeah, no... There is a semi-hidden path south of the house you can use: keep the Dowsing Machine on to detect a Revive in a rock on the east side. A Spell Tag, which boosts the power of Ghost-type moves, can be found further to the south.

If you go back to the "haunted" house, then east and speak with the woman near the water, she'll give you TM06. It teaches Toxic, a nice move that Poisons the target and continues to increase the damage taken from it: it's more useful than you think, especially on weak (sometimes outright sacrificial) Pokémon like Shedinja. Surf across the nearby water to find a Pokéball in the water containing a Damp Rock. Ha ha. Anyways, this lengthens the duration of Rain Dance by a couple of turns. Then go back, head west, and north into Laverre.




Laverre City



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Tiny Mushroom [_] TM41 (Torment) [_] Ether [_] Poké Doll [_] Encounter Power Lv. 1 [_] Ultra Ball
[_] Gengarite [_] Leaf Stone [_] Poké Doll [_] Burn Heal [_] Poké Ball [_] Max Ether
[_] Hyper Potion [_] Max Revive

LAVERRE CITY POKÉMART - GENERAL
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random encounters for 200 steps (most cost-effective option).
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

LAVERRE CITY POKÉMART - STAT/EV-BOOSTING ITEMS
Item NameCost Stat IncreasedEV ChangeOther Notes
Calcium $9,800 Special Attack +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510
Carbos $9,800 Speed +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510
HP Up $9,800 Max HP +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510
Iron $9,800 Defense +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510
Protein $9,800 Attack +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510
Zinc $9,800 Special Defense +10 Fails if stat EVs are 100 or total is 510

As you enter town, go northwest and examine the flowers to find a Tiny Mushroom - the kid next to them will hand you TM41: it teaches Torment, a move preventing the target from using the same move consecutively. (This is especially useful when a Pokémon uses moves like Power-Up Punch that grow powerful with more use.) The second house you see to the right is a place to buy clothes, which still comes off a waste of PokéMoney to me. >_>

If you go into the alley between the houses, to the back, then east, you can grab an Ether. In the southeastern part of the town, next to the Pokémon Center, a guy is asking for Pokémon under 12 inches in height. This includes the following Pokémon:


POKÉMON UNDER 12 INCHES (~30 CENTIMETERS) IN HEIGHT
Diglett Natu Azurill Budew Burmy Shaymin (Land Forme) Foongus
Joltik Tynamo Flabébé Floette Spritzee Dedenne Klefki

^sr19|The Pledge Tutor.

For showing him such a Pokémon, you get a Poké Doll. In the Pokémon Center itself, you can heal up. You'll also be able to buy some EV-boosting items from the PokéMart, and you can get Encounter Power Lv. 1 from Mr. Bonding over there in the western corner. Cross the bridge nearby to find yourself in front of the Laverre City Gym. In the house nearby, you can learn some of the "Pledge" moves to starter Pokémon if they like you enough. They are extremely powerful if you use them with other Pledges in a Double or Triple Battle (Fire with Grass, Grass with Water, Water with Fire, per their descriptions, but that just cyclically includes all of them, like when you reverse the third set).


LAVERRE TOWN MOVE TUTOR - ELEMENTAL PLEDGES
Move Name Type Power Accuracy Max PP Class Targets Possible Learners
Grass Pledge Grass 80 100 10 Special One Bulbsaur, Ivysaur, Venusaur, Chikorita, Bayleef, Meganium, Treecko, Grovyle, Sceptile, Turtwig, Grotle, Torterra, Snivy, Servine, Serperior, Chespin, Quilladen, Chesnaught
Fire Pledge Fire 80 100 10 Special One Charmander, Charmeleon, Charizard, Cyndaquil, Quilava, Typhlosion, Torchic, Combusken, Blaziken, Chimchar, Monferno, Infernape, Tepig, Pignite, Emboar, Fennekin, Braixen, Delphox
Water Pledge Water 80 100 10 Special One Squirtle, Wartortle, Blastoise, Totodile, Croconaw, Feraligatr, Mudkip, Marshtomp, Swampert, Piplup, Prinplup, Empoleon, Oshawott, Dewott, Samurott, Froakie, Frogadier, Greninja

Back outside, if you head to the far west, you can use the Dowsing Machine to find an Ultra Ball south of the stairs. If you go upstairs and west, the woman will give you a Gengarite, which allows you to Mega Evolve Gengar! (Now if you could only find one, or at least Gastly...) In the house nearby, the old man will your Pokémon an Effort Ribbon if its EVs are maxed out - if you don't know, playing Super Training will not make any boosts. (And, of course, this guy gives the ribbon. Duh.)

In the next house, you can learn which Pokémon you used when battling for each Badge. (That's creepy, there...) If you go east outside and behind the Gym, then further along to the house, you can examine the 'shrooms beside it for a Leaf Stone. The Ace Trainer nearby will request that you bring her a Pokémon over nine feet, ten inches tall. (That's the exact height of the unfused Kyurem and Xerneas, for you trivia buffs.)


POKÉMON OVER 9'10" (APPROXIMATELY THREE METERS) IN HEIGHT
Arbok Arceus (any Forme) Black Kyurem (Zekrom-fusion) Dialga Dragonair
Giratina (Altered Forme) Giratina (Origin Forme) Groudon Gyarados Ho-oh
Kyogre Lugia Milotic Onix Palkia
Rayquaza Regigigas Reshiram Serperior Steelix
Wailord White Kyurem (Reshiram-fusion) Xerneas Yveltal Zygarde

As before, doing this nets you a Poké Doll. The house nearby is another one of those restaurants where you can pay $500, $1,000, or $5,000 to sit somewhere, then later talk to customers to register Pokémon as "seen" in the Pokédex. For $500, you can see Staryu; for $1,000, Mawile and Mime Jr.; and for $5,000, you can see Bagon. (The $5,000 is a waste - you could've already seen Bagon at Route 8 - Cliffside.)

If you go back to the other side of town, then leave to the north, you will find the Poké Ball Factory, While there is not much to do there right now, you can use the Dowsing Machine west of the main driveway to find a Burn Heal, and a Poké Ball in the maze, plus a Max Ether in plain sight. In the east maze, you'll find a Hyper Potion with the Dowsing Machine and a Max Revive in plain sight.

So, that 'bout covers Laverre. Heal up and enter the Fairy-centric Gym!




Laverre City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Fairy Badge [_] TM99 (Dazzling Gleam)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Furisode Girl Kali $2,736 Dedenne Lv. 38, Azumarill Lv. 38
Furisode Girl Linnea $2,800 Aromatisse Lv. 38
Furisode Girl Blossom $2,664 Klefki Lv. 37, Granbull Lv. 37, Kirlia Lv. 37
Furisode Girl Katherine $2,880 Slurpuff Lv. 40

Like pretty much every Pokémon game, X and Y contain a Gym with a teleporter puzzle. This ... is that Gym. Each teleporter has a fixed destination: with proper knowledge, which I shall yield, you will be able to make your way to the Gym Leader. In doing so, you will end up finding every Trainer, because one is in every "checkpoint" room along the way. You don't have to fight 'em if you don't want to, for the most part, if you can dodge them.

Anyways, go through the northwest teleporter and battle Kali. Then go through the southwest one for Linnea. Head into the southwest teleporter to battle Blossom, then through the southeast teleporter to battle Katherine. After this battle, go through the northwest teleporter to end up in front of the Gym Leader.

If you need visual help with that puzzle (or want to ponder alternate routes), a map is below. In it, the blue circles mark teleporters and go from "1" to "1", "2" to "2", and so on. Likewise, the Trainers are marked in red squares ("E" being the Leader), and Teleporter 12 won't work until winning the Fairy Badge.

^l20|The Laverre City Gym map.


BOSS: Gym Leader Valerie

  • Rewards: $6,720; Fairy Badge; TM99 (Dazzling Gleam)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mawile Steel/Fairy Level 38 N/A
Mr. Mime Psychic/Fairy Level 39 N/A
Sylveon Fairy Level 42 N/A

  • Mawile: For the record, while this Pokémon is known to have a Mega Evolution, it won't in this Gym Battle. ;) It is only weak to Fire and Ground, though, and takes no damage from Poison or Dragon moves.

  • Mr. Mime: Another part-Fairy type that was altered in coming into Generation VI, Mr. Mime is weak to Poison, Ghost, and Steel. As with all Fairies, it's immune to Dragon. I swear, it feels so weird saying some of these things... >_>

  • Sylveon: The only new Eevee evolution introduced in Generation VI, Sylveon is weak to Poison and Steel, and immune to Dragon.

This will probably be one of the hardest Gym Battles, especially for series veterans like myself who are used to thinking of these Pokémon as Steel for Mawile and Psychic for Mr. Mime: the Fairy typing, new with Generation VI, really screwed some of us. >_>

To those confused by the new typings, like myself, you'll find your starters working suitably. While Fairies do have advantages over Fighting (Chesnaught) and Dark (Greninja), in addition to Dragon, you'll find that your Kanto starters live up fine against them ... so long as you don't Mega Evolve Charizard in Pokémon X, as its type becomes Fire/Dragon. >_> Mawile is best dealt with through a Fire starter (or if someone can use Dig/Earthquake...), but with the others, you probably won't get super-effectives on either side of the field. Do note that Blaziken - if you got the X/Y launch event Torchic or use PokéBank starting around January - can learn Shadow Claw to help with Mr. Mime.

So, let's say you do care about one-hitting these guys. Okay, well, as before, a Fire starter works best with Mawile. Mr. Mime and Sylveon are best taken down by a Pokémon I told you to get and train way back around [[Route 7]] - Honedge, who is either Doublade (Level 35) or Aegislash (Doublade with Dusk Stone) by now. Ghost and Steel work wonders on Mr. Mime, and the Steel works enough on Sylveon. There's also the fact that Ghost and Steel make an excellent defensive combo - immune to Fighting, Normal, and Poison, and only weak to Fire, Ground, Ghost, and Dark with others mostly being resisted at some point.

If you did that Steelix trade waaay back in Cyllage Town, you can probably grind him a little if needed by holding a Lucky Egg - Level 40 or so is sufficient for this. Steel continues to help out like that. ... That's about the summation of it. Either use a Fire starter (preferably just Fire when going for Kalos), or use Steel types.


After the battle, you'll receive the sixth Badge, the Fairy Badge. This Badge makes traded Pokémon up to Level 80 obey you. You also earn TM99, which teaches Dazzling Gleam, an 80-Power Fairy-type move.

Well, just use the northwest teleporter and leave the Gym.



Psychic Badge



Sectional Flowchart






The Poké Ball Factory



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Quick Ball [_] Metal Coat [_] Timer Ball [_] Master Ball [_] Big Nugget

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $1,480 Toxicroak Lv. 37
Team Flare Grunt $1,440 Mightyena Lv. 36, Golbat Lv. 36
Team Flare Grunt $1,440 Scraggy Lv. 36, Mightyena Lv. 36
Team Flare Grunt $1,480 Swalot Lv. 37
Team Flare Admin $3,040 Scraggy Lv. 37, Houndoom Lv. 38
Team Flare Celosia & Bryony $11,480 Manectric Lv. 41, Liepard Lv. 41

As you leave the Laverre Gym, you'll meet up with Shauna and Trevor, who will run off to the Poké Ball Factory - you remember, that place northwest of the main city? First head to the Pokémon Center for some healing, then go on. As you enter, be sure to go into the southeast and southwest mazes for a Burn Heal, Poké Ball, Max Ether, Max Revive, and Hyper Potion (some are hidden: Dowse for them) - they were noted back in Laverre City. As you ascend the stairs to the Factory, speak with Shauna and Trevor: they'll run off, soon followed by your rival and Tierno. Shauna eventually screams off in the distance, a Team Flare Grunt pursuing her. Tierno goes to help her, while your rival and you will proceed into the Factory to see why a Team Flare Grunt was there.

Within, approach the Team Flare Grunt. After some mocking, your rival battles her, leaving you free to take out the rest. Defeat the Grunt atop the nearby stairs, then get on the nearby conveyor belt. After being dragged, go down the ramp where you stopped to battle another Grunt. Go on the ground west and north of him to find a useful Quick Ball, then ride the conveyor; once stopped, go west a step and get on. Once off again, go southeast and speak with that Grunt to battle her.

Go east, south, and east along the ground to find a Metal Coat. This item can be held during trades to make Onix into Steelix, or Scyther into Scizor; it also makes Steel-type moves more powerful. Go back to the previous Grunt, then north onto the conveyor. At the end, go east and north along the ground to get a Timer Ball. Then go back to the conveyor and upstairs. Head along the path to a north/west fork; go north, then east at the next fork to find a Pokéball-obsessed Grunt to battle. (I wonder how many she pocketed? And dropped, given the one in the grounds and two insofar in the factory?)

^sr21|Such misplaced confidence!

From there, go west and north into the small building and speak with the woman in the southeast corner to get a free healing. After, exit the enclosure and go south and downstairs. Examine the console to reverse the direction of the conveyor belt. Ride it, then ascend the nearby steps. Go south if you didn't already battle the first Grunt; otherwise, go north and upstairs into another enclosure. After the scene in there, you'll have to battle one of the Team Flare Admins. (It's not too hard, really.) The same can be said what follows: your rival comes in to help you Double Battle the other two. (Oh, come on, that could've been a fun Triple Battle. T_T)

After the battle, you are given the choice between a Master Ball or a Big Nugget - the former guarantees catching a wild Pokémon (well, almost) whereas the latter can be sold. Either way, you'll get both! The Master Ball has a catch rate of x255, which guarantees the capture of any wild Pokémon (unless you use cheats in some way), so you'll REALLY want to save that for a special occasion. And the Big Nugget, as said before, can be sold for a high sum of money.

After, just exit the building and go west and south and along the path down the stairs. As you'll leave, you'll meet with Shauna, Trevor, and Tierno. After some chatting, they suggest Dendemille Town as the next destination. As you leave, you'll get a Holo Clip regarding the attack on the Poké Ball Factory - it's mostly to inform you that Pokéballs will still be sold, and their prices unchanged, despite the mass theft.

So, that's about it. Head back into Laverre, heal up, and go onto Route 15.

(Geez... How did I earn over $70,000 before leaving the city?)




Route 15



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Revive [_] Net Ball [_] Leppa Berry [_] Antidote [_] Dire Hit [_] Tiny Mushroom
[_] PP Up [_] Full Heal [_] Protein [_] Macho Brace [_] X Defense

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Liepard Dark Limber, Unburden, Prankster 2 Speed Y
Mightyena Dark Intimidate, Quick Feet, Moxie 2 Attack X
Skorupi Poison/Bug Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
Watchog Normal Illuminate, Keen Eye, Analytic 1 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Murkrow Dark/Flying Insomnia, Super Luck, Prankster 1 Speed Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Pokémon Ranger Silas $3,120 Quagsire Lv. 39, Beartic Lv. 39
Hex Maniac Luna $1,280 Chimecho Lv. 40
Pokémon Ranger Dean $3,120 Watchog Lv. 39, Seadra Lv. 39, Swoobat Lv. 39
Pokémon Ranger Keith $3,280 Gabite Lv. 41
Pokémon Ranger Pedro $3,280 Vileplume Lv. 41
Mysterious Sisters Rune & Rime $2,560 Drifblim Lv. 40, Floette Lv. 40
Fairy Tale Girl Mahalyn $1,248 Dedenne Lv. 37, Aromatisse Lv. 39

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: There's not much of anything of note here. Pawniard is the closest you get because of its somewhat-varied moveset being able to take care of some of its weak points (and it has several type resistances). It also specializes heavily in its physical stats on evolution. Floatzal and Poliwhirl might make some semi-decent replacements for those without a good Water Pokémon (as in, you got rid of Lapras!?), but neither will be quite useful in the near future. So, in summation ... meh.

I love the music here, though! ^_^

As you head eastward, you'll find a bunch of leaves flying around: it took them 16 years to recognize the seasons, and another two to realize that leaves fall off trees and typically stay, then put the latter in a seasonless game. Nice. Just nice Game Freak. >_< Anyways, if you go south while in the leaves, you'll find a bundle of them. Some tend to be just piles; some ... other stuff happens. To the south, past the grass, you'll find a Pokémon Ranger for example. At the end of this path is another bundle, this one containing a Revive.

Go back to the entrance of the Route and head east. The next pile of leaves has a Net Ball. Ignore whatever signal is coming from your Dowsing Machine for now and beat the Hex Maniac to the south. Then go back east and hop over the ledge. Collect the Leppa Berry, then use the Dowsing Machine to navigate to an Antidote. Continue south and over the ledge to find three lumps of leaves; in the north one is a Pokémon Ranger - another lump to the east also has a Ranger within. Now, go south and through the grass to find some more lumps, one with a Ranger inside. (Why the heck do they love beds of leaves so much?)

To the west, you can find a Dire Hit in that pile of leaves. Go east and Surf onto the water, then go north. You'll soon be able to get on two pieces of land. To the west, you can use the Dowsing Machien to find a Tiny Mushroom; on the east piece, you'll find a PP Up in the pile o' leaves. Surf back south to the bridge and cross it. Head south upon crossing and go along the path to some stones. Cross by hopping over them (or outright Surf) to reach the Full Heal. Now go back and north and east to a Double Battle - your first chance to test out the Pledge combo, by the way. ;)

In the nearby stone structure, use Rock Smash to break down the northwestern cracked wall to find a useful Protein. Continue back to the girls, then go east and across the bridge. After the Holo Clip from Lysandre, go east and break down the dark wall with Rock Smash to find a Macho Brace within - it doubles EV growth but lowers Speed on the holder. Get out of the structure and head south to beat the Fairy Tale Girl, then east.

Through the gatehouse here, you can go straight to Dendemille Town - however, we'll do a bit more on this Route, Route 16, and in the Lost Hotel. If you're opting for the side stuff (yay!) go north of the gatehouse to battle Carrie. Go up the stairs in the northern building and along the edge to the final gap before the northeast corner. Examine the tile to its left (use the Dowsing Machine if lost) to find an X Defense.

Now, we can either go to Route 16 - south of the gatehouse - or the Lost Hotel - downstairs in this building. Since we'll have to visit at least a little of Route 16 before going for the Lost Hotel, I recommend Route 16.




Route 16



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Max Revive [_] Rare Candy [_] Lum Berry [_] Big Mushroom [_] Max Potion [_] Super Rod
[_] Dive Ball x10 [_] Fist Plate [_] Rare Candy [_] Repel [_] Dive Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Phantump Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Harvest 1 Attack Both
Pumpkaboo Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Insomnia 1 Defense Both
Skorupi Poison/Bug Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Murkrow Dark/Flying Insomnia, Super Luck, Prankster 1 Speed Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Sky Trainer Clara $4,000 Emolga Lv. 38, Swellow Lv. 40
Roller Skater Olle $1,248 Manectric Lv. 40
Roller Skater Jet $1,248 Delcatty Lv. 37, Swanna Lv. 39
Sky Trainer Gavin $3,900 Chimecho Lv. 37, Talonflame Lv. 39, Vibrava Lv. 38
Pokémon Ranger Lee $3,120 Crawdaunt Lv. 39, Sandslash Lv. 39
Hex Maniac Osanna $1,280 Pumpkaboo Lv. 40
Pokémon Ranger Bjorn $3,280 Sliggoo Lv. 41
Mysterious Sisters Achlys & Eos $2,560 Alakazam Lv. 40, Gardevoir Lv. 40
Fairy Tale Girl Alice $1,248 Klefki Lv. 37, Mawile Lv. 39
Fisherman Wade $2,184 Poliwhirl Lv. 37, Poliwhirl Lv. 39
Fisherman Seward $2,240 Whiscash Lv. 40
Fisherman Finn $2,128 Basculin Lv. 38, Basculin Lv. 38

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: This is largely the same as Route 15. In other words, "meh"-mania continues. The only real new ones - Phantump and Pumpkaboo - are so subject to weakness (Fire, Ice, Bug, Poison, Flying, Ghost, Dark - about 50% of all moves) that it's hardly worth grabbing them unless you're desperate for a Ghost-type to round out your party: and, even then, Honedge on [[Route 7]] just works out so much better because the relatively rare advantage over Fairy it has while maintaining a strong type-based defense. ... Again, meh.

As you enter the Route, go south and smack that boulder with Strength to open the path. (Why do think we never bothered coming before? It had nothing to do with numerical order... Okay, it had something to do with numerical order. >_>) Enjoy the Sky Battle to the southwest, then go north to the structure. Like the one on Route 15, going down leads to the Lost Hotel, which we'll leave for later. On the upper floor, examine the northwesternmost tile for a Max Revive. Leave the building go southwest to find some Skaters going around. Then go north and Cut down the tree past the tall grass and head due north to easily find a Rare Candy.

Go back south to the main route and west. When you see the path jutting off to the north, you can go to the end to battle a Sky Trainer. Otherwise, go south and the first pile of leaves makes you battle Lee. Ha ha. Further along the path of leaves is a Hex Maniac, hiding the grass. Go east of there and grab the Lum Berry (cures all non-stats-based ailments, except KO and Pokérus). Go southwest using the Dowsing Machine to find a Big Mushroom hidden in the pile of leaves. (Come on, you should've expected it to happen.) Go east from there through the grass for a Max Potion.

Return to the other side of the grass and go further west to find a Pokémon Ranger to battle. (He's in the southwestern pile of leaves.) Go further north and down the staircase for a Double Battle. Then go west and smack the boulder around with Strength; beat the Fairy Girl on the other side, too, while you're at it. There's nothing (reachable) to the north, so just go west and south. In the Fishing Shack at the bottom, speak with one dude for a Super Rod. As for the other? If you meet the same Pokémon while fishing eight times or more in a row, you'll get ten Dive Balls. (Hint: use the Old Rod. It's better than the 1 in 256 odds you'll have out here with the Good/Super Rods.)

Once back outside, go south and through the flowers to another Strength boulder. Smack 'er around a bit and you can reach a Fist Plate at the top. As with the others, it boosts the power of Fighting-type moves and turns Arceus into a Fighting-type. The rock nearby also contains a second Rare Candy for ya. ^_^ Return to the Shack and head west if you want to return to Lumiose City (nothing new, though). Otherwise, go north of the Shack and proceed onto the pier. On the west pier, you'll find Fisherman Wade to battle. Head east from there, using the Dowsing Machine to grab a Repel as you go to Fisherman Seward. (It's on the corner tile, right next to him.) Return to where Wade was go north north and along the path to the final Fisherman of the Route, (Huckleberry?) Finn.

Go north onto land from there and head to the far west to find a Dive Ball. That'll do it, too - return back to the stone structure on Route 15 and go into the lower area. (If you need to heal, Lumiose City is nearby, able to service your needs.) I say Route 15 because something we need to do there affects Route 16 to some extent.




Lost Hotel



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Smoke Ball [_] TM95 (Snarl) [_] Twisted Spoon [_] Dread Plate [_] TM56 (Fling ) [_] Protector

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Electrode Electric Soundproof, Static, Aftermath 2 Speed Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Litwick Fire/Ghost Flame Body, Flash Fire, Shadow Tag 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Magneton Steel/Electric Magnet Pull, Sturdy, Analytic 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Pawniard Steel/Dark Defiant, Inner Focus, Pressure 1 Attack Both
POKÉMON FOUND IN TRASH CANS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Rotom (Normal Forme) Electric/Ghost Levitate 1 Sp.Atk., 1 Speed Both
Trubbish Poison Stench, Sticky Hold, Aftermath 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Magnemite Steel/Electric Magnet Pull, Sturdy, Analytic 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Voltorb Electric Soundproof, Static, Aftermath 1 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Punk Guy Sid $1,872 Scrafty Lv. 39, Pawniard Lv. 39, Sharpedo Lv. 39
Punk Girl Jeanne $1,920 Seviper Lv. 40, Arbok Lv. 40
Punk Couple Zoya & Asa $4,032 Pangoro Lv. 42, Garbodor Lv. 42
Punk Guy Slater $2,016 Dunsparce Lv. 42
Punk Guy Jacques $1,920 Skuntank Lv. 40, Crawdaunt Lv. 40
Punk Girl Cecile $1,920 Liepard Lv. 40, Liepard Lv. 40

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: The primary feature here is Rotom ("Motor" backwards), a pseudolegendary Pokémon that was one-of-a-kind back in Generation IV, which now can be found in the trash cans. Heh, irony... Anyways, it is most famous for being able to transform into a number of different types: Electric paired with Ghost, Fire, Grass, Water, Flying, and Ice, depending on what was examined in some areas, though I'm not sure how it works in this game. (It is also always immune to Ground, by the way, through the Levitate ability.) It's worth getting. Magneton isn't too bad, although we don't really need Steel or Electric types for the rest of the game, for the most part.

~ Lost Hotel: Route 15 Side ~

As you enter, go southwest and battle the Punk there. Go to the south, then past the intersection to battle another Punk. Continue south for a Smoke Ball, then go back north and down the hallway to the west for a Double Battle with Punks. (Lotta Punks here.) Continue west to find some less violent Punks; just go north and you'll learn the Cosmic Flip. Leave the room heading southeast to find a brown block to hit with Rock Smash. You'll find TM95 (Snarl) on the other side - it is a TM that was Event-only in Black/White Versions 1. It has 55 Power, is of the Dark-type, may lower Special Attack, and hits all opponents. Back in the hall, continue east to a Twisted Spoon, which powers up Psychic moves. That'll do it for this bit: go now to the one on Route 16.


~ Lost Hotel: Route 16 Side ~

As you enter, head west and battle another Punk Guy. (He deviates from Punk tradition by using the Normal-type Dunsparce: that's a rebel! =P) Break the western of the two breakable walls nearby for a Dread Plate: it boosts Ghost moves' power and turns Arceus into a Ghost-type when held. Further to the west, you can speak with a Skater for TM56. This teaches Fling, a move in which the Pokémon throws an item at the target, who catches it. For example, you can throw a Sitrus Berry to an ally in a Double/Triple Battle to let them heal 30 HP at some point, or you could throw the Ring Target at a Shedinja to make it damageable with any move and not just Fire, Flying, Rock, Ghost, and Dark.

Go east and up the hall. Here, a Punk will be circling around, so beat him, then go north and west. Beat the Punk in the next room, then go southeast. Break the first wall you reach to find a Protector - if a Rhydon (evolved from Rhyhorn) holds this during a trade, it becomes Rhyperior on the other side. And ... that's all folks. Return outside, then east and north into Dendemille Town. (Say that five times fast.)




Dendemille Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM42 (Facade) [_] Leppa Berry [_] Shell Bell [_] Big Root [_] Nugget [_] Sitrus Berry
[_] Accuracy Power Lv. 1

DENDEMILLE TOWN POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

DENDEMILLE TOWN - MOOMOO MILK SALESWOMAN
Item Name Cost Effect
Moomoo Milk (x1) $500 Heals HP by 100 for a Pokémon in the field or battle.
Moomoo Milk (x12) $6,000 Heals HP by 100 for a Pokémon in the field or battle.

Snow!? (And the music somewhat makes me think of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity in its first few notes.)

As you go east into the town, Sycamore will come up, speaking (mostly) of the Pokémon Lysandre mentioned in his café - Xerneas (in Pokémon X) and Yveltal (in Pokémon Y), representing life and destruction respectively, I guess from the contexts. Anyways, Trevor speeds into town, wanting to go to the Frost Cavern, then simply setting roots or something. (Maybe he used Ingrain? =P)

Anyways, go east and north and up the stairs. Head west at the top and into the southwestern house. Speak with the little boy for TM42 - it teaches Facade, which is a Normal-type move whose power is doubled if the user is Burned, Poisoned, or Paralyzed. The other person in the house will give a Leppa Berry for showing her whatever TM she requests. In the northeast house, if you have over 70 Pokémon in your Mountain Kalos Pokédex, you can get a Shell Bell - it lets the user take some HP from the targets when hit for HP restoration.

^sr22|

Go back downstairs and into the house next to them. In the northwest corner is the Move Deleter - he can get rid of any moves you don't want a Pokémon to have. (It's mostly for the sake of forgetting HM moves you don't want.) On the right is the Move Relearner: she can teach a Pokémon any move it normally would have already learned through leveling up for the cost of one Heart Scale. (NOTE: I seriously mean leveling-up. For the most part, forgotten TM/HM moves and some others cannot be relearned this way!)

Go far to the south of there to find a Big Root: it boosts the power of HP-stealing moves, such as Absorb. Use the Dowsing Machine, too, to find a Nugget nearby in the southwest field. Go south of where Trevor is and you'll find a Hex Maniac selling Moomoo Milk. It's quite useful if you're Pokémon aren't yet at that level where Hyper Potions are quite needed. (Then again, my Delphox is Level 63 and I have $233,000 to spend. >_>;;) Go due west of her to the end of the path, then face south and press A to find a Heal Ball.

Within the Pokémon Center, heal up and shop per the usual. Speak with the person to the right for a Sitrus Berry. Mr. Bonding is on the left side, giving you Accuracy Power Lv. 1. That'll do it here for now, though - go north of town.




Frost Cavern



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] X Sp. Def. [_] Escape Rope [_] Ice Heal [_] Ice Heal [_] Dusk Ball [_] Ice Heal
[_] Ice Heal [_] Icy Rock [_] Pearl [_] Max Repel [_] Never-Melt Ice [_] Hyper Potion
[_] Super Potion [_] Elixir [_] Zinc [_] TM79 (Frost Breath) [_] Ether [_] Abomasite
[_] PP Up

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM INSIDE THE CAVERN
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Beartic Ice Snow Cloak, Swift Swim 2 Attack Both
Bergmite Ice Own Tempo, Ice Body, Sturdy 1 Defense Both
Cryogonal Ice Levitate 2 Sp.Def. Both
Haunter Ghost/Poison Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Jynx Ice/Psychic Forewarn, Oblivious, Dry Skin 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Piloswine Ice/Ground Oblivious, Snow Cloak, Thick Fat 1 Attack, 1 HP Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Cubchoo Ice Snow Cloak, Rattled 1 Attack Both
Smoochum Ice/Psychic Forewarn, Oblivious, Hydration 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Vanillite Ice Ice Body, Weak Armor 1 Sp.Atk. Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Hiker Ross $2,464 Vibrava Lv. 44
Sky Trainer Celso $4,400 Carnivine Lv. 41, Swanna Lv. 44
Sky Trainer Era $4,500 Cryogonal Lv. 45
Artist Salvador $2,464 Smeargle Lv. 44
Ace Trainer Cordelia $4,600 Doublade Lv. 46
Ace Trainer Neil $4,300 Raichu Lv. 42, Golduck Lv. 42, Marowak Lv. 43
Hiker Delmon $2,352 Relicanth Lv. 42, Rhydon Lv. 42
Brains & Brawn Eoin & Wolf $4,784 Grumpig Lv. 44, Hariyama Lv. 46
Black Belt Alonzo $2,112 Scrafty Lv. 43, Throh Lv. 44
Battle Girl Kinsey $2,112 Sawk Lv. 43, Mienshao Lv. 44
Hiker Alain $2,352 Graveler Lv. 40, Graveler Lv. 41, Carbink Lv. 42
Black Belt Kenji $2,208 Gurdurr Lv. 46
Hiker Brent $2,464 Probopass Lv. 44
Battle Girl Gabrielle $2,208 Medicham Lv. 46
Team Flare Grunt $1,680 Golbat Lv. 42, Manectric Lv. 42
Team Flare Mable $6,720 Houndoom Lv. 48

WEATHER - HAIL

Outside the Frost Cavern, the weather may be Hailing, and it will remain so throughout the course of battles that take place unless another move or ability changes the weather. During Hailing weather, Pokémon that are not of the Ice type will lose around 1/16 of their HP with each turn that passes. Additionally, if a Pokémon uses Blizzard, note that Blizzard will not miss.

As a random note, the sky looks epic outside at night when it's not hailing.


POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: There are some nice Pokémon here. An Ice type is a must to deal with one particularly nasty member of the Elite Four, unless already have a Dragon for that reason. Beartic is nice for brute power while Piloswine/Mamoswine have a somewhat better move variety. Haunter is a must, also, to get - in this case, for our next Psychic-focused Gym. Being Ghost/Poison, it has a nice few Ghost moves that'll probably be one-hitting most of those Psychics just upon capture. >_> Plus, you can trade it (and back again; hopefully, you didn't use Wonder Trade! XD) to get Gengar. This is significant in that you can get Gengarite in Laverre City, which allows Gengar to Mega Evolve!!

To the curious, the base value of all the Trainers' money here is $51,720. Bring along that Amulet Coin and you'll get $113,440. O_O



^sr23|The entrance to Frost Cavern.

~ Outside Frost Cavern ~


Go north from the entrance to the area and battle the Hiker, then go east for a Sky Battle. Go north and over the bridge to find that Mamoswine who is being disturbed by happenings in Frost Cavern proper. After meeting Trevor, you'll get control of your (virtual) self again. Go east and north to the ledge, then to the east side to have another Sky Battle. (Scared the crap out of me, too - I went over that one tile by accident when leaving.) Go back to Trevor and the Mamoswine, then along the dirt path to fight an Artist. (I wonder if his name is meant to reference Salvador Dali...? ... He was an artist, right?) Anyhow, use the Dowsing Machien nearby to find an X Sp. Def. Go north to use a Photo Spot if you want (as I obviously did), then go inside. (Due west of the entrance, examine the rock first to find an Escape Rope.)


~ Inside Frost Cavern ~

Examine the rock in the alcove to the west for an Ice Heal, then go northeast and battle the Ace Trainer. (Seriously? I one-hit you and you call it close!?) Slide east and north on the ice, then go north to the next area. Examine the southwestern rock for an Ice Heal, then go back to the previous area. Slide eastward on the northern row of ice, then go north to the wall and press A for a Dusk Ball. Battle the nearby Ace Trainer, then go north to the next area.

Slide north across the ice, then go east and examine the rock for another Ice Heal. Go south there and slide over the ice, then go east, south, west, and north. See how the southern part of this particular snow patch also juts out like a peninsula to the west? Slide west from it to land right at the feet of a Hiker. Then slide north from the northeasternmost possible tile to find a fourth Ice Heal. (Geez...) Go back south. See that small rock on the west side of the "island"? Go south from it, then west.

Continue west to ever more ice. Slide west from the southern of the two ice trails for a Double Battle. Go due north onto the ice, then west and south to some snow. Go west a step, then slide north, west, and north. Defeat the Black Belt, then go due south of him for a Battle Girl. Go west and Surf on the water to the west side. Go along the path downstairs.


EEVEE & GLACEON

Here, you'll find a large, icy rock. This rock does have a purpose. If you level-up an Eevee near it, it will then evolve into Glaceon, an Ice-type Pokémon introduced with Diamond and Pearl. This is the only way to get Glaceon here, short of trading, hacking, or PokéBank.


Go along the path here to an Icy Rock (plus the icy rock that Eevee evolves near is in the center of the path). Icy Rock lengthens the duration of the move Hail by about two turns. Return back upstairs and Surf onto the water. Surf south until, while looking at the patch of ice to the east, you see a patch of snow on its west side. Get on the ice, then the snow. Examine the southernmost snow tile there for a Pearl. Go west, south, east, and south. Take two steps west and go north and east for a Max Repel. Slide west to the snow, then go west again. Surf south from here to find some Never-Melt Ice, which boosts the power of the holders Ice-type moves. Return north, get on the ice, return to the southern snow patch, and go downstairs.

Here, go east and speak with the Ace Trainer if you need a healing, then go further south for a Hyper Potion. Then go back north (the ramp is to the entrance again) , then go up to the healer and battle the Hiker to the northeast (who may have frostbite: use a lot of Fire). Continue upstairs and examine the rock to the northeast for a Super Potion. Continue upstairs to the next floor.

Go due north to the Black Belt for a battle. Go further north if you want to continue on. Otherwise, go east from the northernmost ice tile you can currently reach and go along to the Hiker. Return to the west. Now, you see that small rock on the snow "island", right? Go west of it, but not onto the ice: just as close as possible. Then slide south, then east, south, west, and south to some snow. Go south to battle a Battle Girl, then slide around to her south and examine the rock for an Elixir. Go along the ice nearby heading east, then another southbound path. First be sure to loop around to the eastbound snow path if needed for a Zinc (boosts Special Defense EVs by 10), then go back west and south and downstairs. Here, go east to the corner, south to another, then slide northwest (you must do both: either press both buttons on the D-Pad, or use the Circle Pad) and you'll find TM79 down to the south here: it teaches Frost Breath, a decent Ice-type move.

Go back north and west, then upstairs. Backtrack along to the main ice puzzle. As you slide west in there, go south, east, and north to find an Ether. Then go east, south, west, south, east, and north to return to the Black Belt. Go north from there to see some Team Flare dudes. (Trevor will also come up behind you.) Team Flare is terrorizing the Abomasnow here. You and Trevor will each take one of the Grunts (it's quite easy, as usual). You'll fight Mable right after, and she's not much more difficult. >_>

After the battle is over, "speak" with the Abomasnow. It will hand over Abomasite, which allows you to Mega Evolve Abomasnow. Now, if only we had an Abomasnow... or at least a Snover. (They'll come soon, though!) Also go southeast and use the Dowsing Machine to find a PP Up. (You could get it before fighting Mable, by the by.) Use the Escape Rope you got near the dungeon entrance to leave, or just walk.




Leaving Dendemille - Route 17



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Timer Ball [_] Icicle Plate [_] Calcium [_] Rare Candy [_] Paralyze Heal

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Abomasnow Grass/Ice Snow Warning, Soundproof 1 Attack, 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Delibird Ice/Flying Hustle, Vital Spirit, Insomnia 1 Speed Both
Sneasel Dark/Ice Inner Focus, Keen Eye, Pickpocket 1 Speed Both
Snover Grass/Ice Snow Warning, Soundproof 1 Attack Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Sky Trainer Anila $4,400 Rotom Lv. 42, Butterfree Lv. 44

WEATHER - HAIL

Here on Route 17, the weather may be Hailing, and it will remain so throughout the course of battles that take place unless another move or ability changes the weather. During Hailing weather, Pokémon that are not of the Ice type will lose around 1/16 of their HP with each turn that passes. Additionally, if a Pokémon uses Blizzard, note that Blizzard will not miss.


POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Pretty much "meh". While Abomasnow is good in that it has a Mega Evolution, it still has too many abusable weaknesses (easily 40+% of all moves) that could be abused. Delibird is just not noteworthy. Sneasel may be helpful in the next Gym, a Psychic one, but you don't really have much time without serious grinding to bring its EVs to up to snuff versus a Doublade/Aegislash you've had for a while.

Once you're done in Frost Cavern, return to Dendemille. Heal up, shop, and head southeast out of the city.

On Route 17, go east and hop on the Mamoswine. Similar to the Rhyhorn of Route 9, this guy lets you go through deep snow (which may cause battles because you step on Pokémon lol), press A to break stuff, and moves exceptionally slow. Go south for a bit, then east to some ice blocks. Break then, then the ones to the northeast. Dismount and get on that path. At the forks, hang west for a while, using your Dowsing Machine to navigate to a Timer Ball. Go south and east of there to find an Icicle Plate in plain sight: this boosts the power of Ice moves and turns Arceus into an Ice type. Return to Mamoswine, then go east and along the path for a Sky Battle atop the terrace.

When done (or dead), return to Mamoswine and begin trudging through the snow to the south; you'll soon find more rocks to break. Break 'em, then the ones further south. Dismount and get into the narrow valley. At the fork, go west and along the path to find a Calcium, useful in that it boosts Special Attack EVs by 10.

Get back on Mamoswine and wreck stuff as you go east through the snow. (Wait. I just realized that there are Pokémon living in this deep snow. What the heck are they doing in there, especially Delibird!?) Continue your grind east, south, and east into some rocks. Shatter them and dismount, then head east. As you do, you'll get a Holo Clip from your rival, requesting a battle. Geez... You have to admire their persistence...

Anyways, go east onto the grass. Head north of the gate along the narrow path for a Rare Candy, then go south using the Dowsing Machine to hunt down a Paralyze Heal. What, no more Ice Heals? =P Anyways, go through the gate to Anistar.




Anistar City



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Exp. Point Power Lv. 1 [_] TM32 (Double Team) [_] TM90 (Substitute) [_] TM35 (Flamethrower) [_] TM77 (Psych Up) [_] TM92 (Trick Room)
[_] Super Repel [_] TM10 (Hidden Power) [_] Comet Shard [_] Escape Rope [_] Pretty Wing

ANISTAR CITY POKÉMART - GENERAL
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

ANISTAR CITY POKÉMART - TMs
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Blizzard (TM14) $70,000 Ice Special 5 110 70 All Opponents May freeze; no miss in Hail
Fire Blast (TM38) $70,000 Fire Special 5 110 85 One May burn; no miss when Sunny?
Focus Blast (TM52) $70,000 Fighting Special 5 120 70 One May lower Special Defense
Hyper Beam (TM15) $90,000 Normal special 5 150 90 One No action on next turn for user
Thunder (TM25) $70,000 Thunder Special 10 110 70 One May paralyze; no miss in Rain

As you head east into the city, you'll be told about someone living here in Anistar knowing something of the legendary Pokémon. And ... that's it? Oh, yeah, and ten Repeat Balls are yours now. Continue along to the Pokémon Center. Outside is some person able to give random facts about events you and your Pokémon have in common, like Pikachu was with me when I caught my Abomasnow. Creepy... Anyways, heal up and shop in the Center. On the west side is Mr. Bonding, who will give you Exp. Point Power Lv. 1. For once, something I find useful! On the east side, the woman there will hand you a different TM depending on the time of day: I've seen TM32, TM90, TM35, TM77, and TM92 so far: they teach Double Team, Flamethrower, Psych Up, and Trick Room, respectively.

Leave and head east. The next building is the clothing shop; in the alley to the east, you can use the Dowsing Machine to find a Super Repel. In the house to the east, you can get TM10. It teaches Hidden Power, a move that is extremely variable, primarily depending upon the user's hidden IVs for each stat. If you were to go south, you'd find Route 18 inaccessible because ... some Durant tore it up? Wut? XD

Go into the house north of the clothing shop to find the dude who knows all about Xerneas/Yveltal. In the house north of there, you can give the guy a Level 5 or under Pokémon (catch one on Route 2 if you must) for three days to get a Comet Shard. If you north of there, you'll find the Pokémon Gym, and a resultant battle with your rival!


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $4,600

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 44 N/A
Absol Dark Level 44 N/A
Jolteon Electric Level 44 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Delphox Fire/Psychic Level 46 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Flareon Fire Level 44 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Greninja Water/Dark Level 46 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Vaporeon Water Level 44 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Chesnaught Grass/Fighting Level 46 Your Kalos starter is Froakie

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this Pokémon. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psybeam for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug.

  • Jolteon: This guy is weak to Ground, and probably can use Volt Absorb to nullify Electric attacks. Its primary advantages are against Flying and Water.

  • Flareon: This Eevee-lution is weak to Ground, Rock, and Water, and could use Flash Fire to null Fire attacks. It's advantageous over Steel, Bug, Ice, and Grass.

  • Vaporeon: The final Eevee-lution of your rival's is weak to Grass and Electric, and probably nulls Water through Water Absorb. Its advantages are over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Delphox: Delphox is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark. Its moves give it an advantage over Steel, Ice, Grass, Bug, Poison, and Fighting. Do note that Psychic cannot hit Dark.

  • Greninja: As for Greninja, this is probably a little problematic for those of you who chose Fennekin. (Poor me!) It is weak to Grass, Electric, Fighting, Bug, and Fairy, and is immune to Psychic. It will have type-based advantages over Ground, Fire, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic.

  • Chesnaught: Finally, Chesnaught would be the easiest of the starters. It is doubly-weak to Flying, as weak as being weak to Fire, Ice, Poison, Psychic, and Fairy. Its moves give it advantages over Ground, Rock, Water, Normal, Ice, Steel, and Dark. Note, however, Fighting cannot hit Ghost, and most Ghosts are paired with the Steel, Fire, or Poison types, so that's really helpful.

Wait ... do I sense change!?

Meowstic and Absol are the same as usual: spam Dark/Ghost/Bug and Fighting/Bug/Fairy on those two to win. (Note how Bug is the common theme: then again, your starters will probably be one-hitting these if I'm even a remote indicator.) The enemy starter also remains the same as usual - counter it with your Kanto starter. That means Charizard on Chesnaught, Venusaur on Greninja, and Blastoise on Delphox. Some of them can be multipurposed with the right moves (like through Dig and such), but that's the ideal combos.

The main feature are your rival's Eevee-lutions, brought about by having certain Kalos starters. While they should hardly be a difficulty, of important note is that they all in some way have an advantage over your Kanto starters' final evolutions, and they're the same type as your actual starter (except in the Jolteon/Delphox coincidence). Then again, that may be a good thing - they can shoot their own moves at you for half-damage, then you retaliate with a move of your sub-type (i.e. Delphox uses the Psychic-move Psychic on Flareon) for normal damage. If you want to go about abusing weaknesses, I suppose throwing in Steelix or Quagsire is good for Jolteon; Quagsire, Onix, Graveler/Golem, or just about any Water Pokémon for Flareon; and there's Pikachu/Raichu, Jolteon, or just about most Grass-types for Vaporeon.

In all, it's still an easy enough battle at Level 45+ - below what you should be; my Delphox is about Level 66. The main change is just the Eevee-lutions.


After the battle, you'll be given a free healing. Go east after the fight and use the Dowsing Machine to locate an Escape Rope, then go west and follow the Machine some more to the (useless) Pretty Wing. Northeast of there is another café where you can spend some money to later speak with people and register Pokémon as seen in the Pokédex. For $500, you can see Accelgor; for $1,000, Patrat and Lotad; for $5,000, Escavalier.

^sr24|The Anistar sundial.

If you go to the west of here and into the next area, you'll find the main landmark of Anistar, its sundial. ... That's huge. Anyways, after all this, it's time to enter the Gym.




Anistar City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Psychic Badge [_] TM04 (Calm Mind)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Psychic Paschal $2,576 Exeggutor Lv. 46
Psychic Harry $2,576 Medicham Lv. 46
Psychic Arthur $2,576 Exeggutor Lv. 46
Hex Maniac Arachna $1,472 Jynx Lv. 46
Hex Maniac Melanie $1,472 Gardevoir Lv. 46

This will be a sort of funky spherical-3D maze Gym. (As a note of trivia, look in the northeast corner of the room: a Pikachu constellation is drawn on the wall there. Cool.)

As soon as you step in the center tile of the room... Well, that's for you to find out. ;) Anyways, begin by going north and beating the Psychic there. Go along the path to the telporter, then go east to another. Here, go south to another, thengo south some more, and head south. (You can go around the next Trainer.) Battle the next Trainer if you want to, then go south some more to a fork. Go east from here and along the lengthy path to another teleporter. Use it, then go north along the path to a fork. Go along the west of the two for a battle, or the east to be able to avoid it. Either way, go south along the westernmost path to a teleporter.

Go north here if you want to battle an optional Hex Maniac. Otherwise, go west. Veer off on the northern path if you want to avoid the next Hex Maniac; otherwise, beeline westward on the south side for the final Gym Trainer. Go west and use the teleporter, then go north to find the Gym Leader.


BOSS: Gym Leader Olympia

  • Rewards: $7,680; Psychic Badge; TM04 (Calm Mind)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Sigilyph Psychic/Flying Level 44 N/A
Slowking Psychic/Water Level 45 N/A
Meowstic Psychic Level 48 N/A

  • Sigilyph: Kinda looks like it'd be an evolution of the "I" Unown, huh? Anyways, this Pokémon is weak to Dark, Ghost, Rock, Electric, and Ice, and immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Bug, and Grass.

  • Slowking: This royal Pokémon is weak to Dark, Bug, Ghost, Grass, and Electric. This Pokémon is a bit of a tank, so don't expect it to be one-hit-killed. The only thing he got on me was Yawn, though... He is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Meowstic: A Pokémon you ought to be familiar with from the rival battles, it is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug. It is advantageous over Fighting and Poison.

This will probably be the easiest Gym Battle in a while. Sigilyph and Slowking have a lot of the same weaknesses - Dark, Ghost, Electric - and they can be spammed fairly easily. You could probably put in Pikachu/Raichu, Jolteon, Doublade/Aegislash, Haunter/Gengar, Sneasel/Weavile, or the like in to win pretty easily. Then again, if you have Greninja, he pretty much trumps most of these because his Dark-typing does immunize him from Psychic...

As for Meowstic? Meh. If you're going for the "one for all" strategem, pretty much anyone named within the previous paragraph works. It's not a complex Gym: even just using one Pokémon, you can do it fine, even if its a starter that's not Greninja, simply because these Pokémon don't readily resist most of the types your starters can throw up and your starters are likely Level 50+ by now - heck, my Delphox was Level 67. >_>


Afte the battle, you'll be rewarded with the Psychic Badge; it makes all traded Pokémon up to Level 90 obey. You will also earn TM04 - it teaches Calm Mind, which boosts your Special stats. After, you can let Olympia teleport ya back.


Iceberg Badge



Sectional Flowchart






The Legend of Kalos: Lysandre Labs



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Revive x5 [_] TM12 (Taunt) [_] Revive [_] Black Glasses [_] Rare Candy [_] Hyper Potion
[_] Elevator Key

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $1,840 Scrafty Lv. 46
Team Flare Grunt $1,840 Liepard Lv. 46
Team Flare Grunt $1,840 Swalot Lv. 46
Team Flare Grunt $1,720 Swalot Lv. 45, Liepard Lv. 43
Team Flare Grunt $1,760 Liepard Lv. 44, Mightyena Lv. 44
Team Flare Grunt $1,760 Houndoom Lv. 44, Toxicroak Lv. 44
Team Flare Grunt $1,800 Manectric Lv. 43, Scrafty Lv. 45
Team Flare Grunt $1,800 Mightyena Lv. 43, Toxicroak Lv. 45
Team Flare Grunt $1,840 Golbat Lv. 46
Team Flare Grunt $1,760 Toxicroak Lv. 44, Liepard Lv. 44

(Use Lumiose City - Second Visit if you need the shops again for Lumiose: it hasn't changed.)

As you leave the Gym, your rival comes up, congratulations you, pondering aloud whether to allow you to battle her daily after all's said and done. (And she will, don't worry.) As things almost heat up again, you get a Holo Clip from Lysandre - uh-oh, ominous music. Time to reveal what we've suspected all along. And it's worse - he's planning for a genocide of the planet, eliminating all outside of Team Flare.

Ruh-roh. Fly to Lumiose City, specifically the center. Use the Pokémon Center to recover from that battle, then enter Lysandre Café opposite there. Within, speak with the waiter and waitress to battle them: they're actually Team Flare Grunts. (That's a real surprise.) They'll reveal that the door's password is "open sesame" (seriously?) and the door can be found by examining the cupboard near the waitress. ...

Well, what lax sec-- Oh, there's Lysandre.


BOSS: Team Flare Lysandre

  • Rewards: $9,800

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mienfoo Fighting Level 45 N/A
Murkrow Dark/Flying Level 45 N/A
Pyroar Normal/Fire Level 47 N/A
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 49 N/A

  • Meinfoo: Like most basic Fighters, this guy is weak to Psychic, Flying, and Fairy, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.

  • Murkrow: Weird why he's yet to use a Dusk Stone on it. Anyways, it is weak to Fairy, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Psychic. It's advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Pyroar: This kitty is weak to Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground, and is immune to Ghost. It has advantages over Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel.

  • Gyarados: It is doubly-weak to Electric, and also weak to Rock; it is immune to Ground, though. It has type-based advantages over Rock, Ground, Fire, Fighting, Grass, and Bug.

Overall, while this fight can be pretty easy, it's the Pokémon variety that will kill you. For Mienfoo, it'll be best to send out the Pokémon you've put an HM for Fly on - it will probably kill easily enough at around Level 40~45. Murkrow is a bit different; you'll want to send out your main Electric type for it, as well doing that for sure on Gyarados. Pyroar is probably best dealt with through Blastoise/Greninja, or just a starter in general: something powerful that isn't likely to deal half-damage hits (all starters can learn multiple move types you know).

It sounds like a half-baked strategy (and it kinda is, given it's hour thirteen of FAQing tonight for me), but Lysandre is simple, just varied.


After the battle, we reach another Pokémon tradition: arrow tile puzzles. These move you all the way in the direction they point until you hit something, or change direction through another. Use the one to the northwest and battle the Grunt, then use the nearby yellowish teleporter. Defeat the nearby Team Flare member.

BOSS: Team Flare Aliana

  • Rewards: $6,720

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mightyena Dark Level 46 N/A
Druddigon Dragon Level 48 N/A

  • Mightyena: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug, and is immune to Psychic. It has advantages over Ghost and Psychic.

  • Druddigon: This Pokémon is weak to Ice, Dragon, and Fairy.

Overall, while this fight is pretty easy if you've battled most people in the game thus far. Fairy-types will dominate this battle pretty much, especially given their immunity to Dragon. Your starter will suffice just as well, though, so long as you use moves of their sub-type (i.e. Psychic moves with Delphox).


After the battle, use the panel to the west (the other one returns you to the entrance). In the next room, go north and use the arrow. After stopping, go northwest and "lay waste" to the Grunt over there, then go north into the next area. Speak the familiar two people here to get five Revives, then leave. Use the southeastern eastbound arrow tile, then go south to go south. Defeat the Grunt nearby, then go west through the door. Speak with the Grunt near the doorway for TM12: it teaches Taunt, preventing the use of non-offensive moves. Get the Revive from the Pokéball nearby, then just examine any ol' bed to heal your party fully.

Back outside, go back east to the Grunt, then northeast to find one you haven't beaten. After, use the eastbound arrow tile. Once you're done spinning, use another eastbound arrow tile to last almost at the feet of another Grunt to battle. Win, then go north into the next room. You'll take on two more Team Flare members in here.


BOSS: Team Flare Celosia

  • Rewards: $6,720

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Manectric Electric Level 46 N/A
Drapion Poison/Dark Level 48 N/A

  • Manectric: As usual, this Electric-type is weak only to Ground, and probably can nullify Electric in some way. It is advantages over Flying and Water.

  • Drapion: This Pokémon is weak to Ground, Fighting, and Fairy, and is immune to Psychic. It has advantages over Psychic, Ghost, and Grass.

Similarly to Aliana, this battle can be won by using a single Pokémon type: here, that type is Ground. Pokémon like Dugtrio, Graveler/Golem, and Steelix will have no problem sweeping through this team. Of course, you can teach (some of) your starter the Ground-type move Dig, which itself is good enough to one-hit-KO most of these around Level 50+.


BOSS: Team Flare Bryony

  • Rewards: $6,720

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Liepard Dark Level 46 N/A
Bisharp Dark/Steel Level 48 N/A

  • Liepard: Liepard is weak to Fairy, Fighting, and Bug, and is immune to Psychic. Although it is typically a weak Pokémon, still notable are its type-based advantages over Ghost and Psychic.

  • Bisharp: This Pokémon is doubly-weak to Fighting, and just weak to Fire and Ground. It also is immune to Poison status and type, and to Psychic.

And, again, we go to find another battle dominated easily enough by one type: Fighting. Your starters will probably be able to learn the Power-Up Punch move from the Fighting Gym some time back (or, at least, my Delphox and Blaziken can): use that and you'll probably one-hit both of these. Probably the easiest fight so far.


After this, go back outside and use westernmost southbound arrow tile, then go west, dodging those tiles. Continue dodging them as you go through the halls, eventually to a teleporter. Use it, then get the nearby Black Glasses. (They power-up the holder's Dark-type moves.) Go north and battle the Grunt there, then use the teleporter. On the other side, go through the door and north to snatch up a Rare Candy.

Go back outside now and reuse the teleporter. On theo ther side, go south and use the westbound arrow tile. Go back southeast and use easternmost of the three arrow tiles to find a teleporter. Use it to go to a Hyper Potion, then go back. Use the eastern southbound tile and head east to another Flare Grunt. Use the nearby teleporter to fight another Grunt, then go east and through the door there. You'll find another Team Flare higher-up within.


BOSS: Team Flare Mable

  • Rewards: $6,720

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Houndoom Dark/Fire Level 46 N/A
Weavile Dark/Ice Level 48 N/A

  • Houndoom: This poor li'l doggy can be easily beaten with Fairy, Fighting, Ground, Rock, and Water. It is immune to Psychic, and advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Ice, Bug, Grass, and Steel.

  • Weavile: To those who don't know, this is the evolved form of Sneasel. Anyhow, it is doubly-weak to Fighting, weak to Bug, Fairy, Fire, Rock, and Steel, and immune to Psychic. It has advantages over Ghost, Psychic, Grass, Ground, and Flying.

Similarly to earlier higher-ups' battles, you can sweep this one with Pokémon of a certain type. In fact, several can be used! Fighting is the big one again, still doable through Power-Up Punch on a starter. Other big ones include Rock and Fairy - you probably don't have as many, if any, of these moves though beyond Rock Tomb and perhaps someone being able to use Dazzling Gleam. Overall, easy.


After the battle, you'll receive the Elevator Key; this will let you go up that elevator from where you battled Lysandre. (Seriously? Why do the bad guys always give up their most important items so willingly? If you didn't hand the Key to me, I'd never get a chance to find -- *muffled*) Go back out of the room, then go south along the wall and use the westbound arrow tile. After you stop ... *vomits* ... use the eastern southbound arrow tile. Finally, go northwest to find the one bring you to the elevator. Use it, then go to the elevator. Use it to head to B2F.

Down here, go west for a while to find ... dude is big. After the spoilerific cinematic regarding Trainer AZ, follow Lysandre and use elevator to go to B3F. Go west and north there; after some ... encouragement? ... from Lysandre, another battle begins.


BOSS: Team Flare Xerosic

  • Rewards: $6,720

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Crobat Poison/Flying Level 46 N/A
Malamar Psychic/Dark Level 48 N/A

  • Crobat: This Pokémon is weak to Psychic, Ice, Rock, and Electric, and takes no damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Grass, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.

  • Malamar: This rather well-defensive Pokémon has a double-weakness to Bug, and a normal weakness to Fairy. It is immune to Psychic, and has advantages over Fighting, Poison, Ghost, and Psychic.

Noooo! We can't sweep this battle with just one type!

Ah, well. May as well use two. Maybe. Crobat is easily taken care of through that Lapras you're still hopefully carrying around, since it should know Ice Beam around now. Ohter good ones include Kadabra/Alakazam, Pikachu/Raichu, Jolteon, and Delphox. All in all, Crobat's definitely the easier one; Malamar will present some problems. Mostly in its type-based stuff, because Bug and Fairy are not quite the most common move types. I mean, sure, if you have 'em, use 'em. But, unless it was a pure-Psychic type, you can probably spam whatever you threw against Crobat against Malamar.


After the battle, you'll be told to push a button - despite the hint given to you, it's apparently remote-activated anyways, so you're screwed nonetheless.

Oh my God... Get out of the labs (just take the elevator to B1F and go south), heal in the Pokémon Center, and Fly to Geosenge. (It is the westernmost town on the Kalos regional map.)




The Legend of Kalos: Team Flare Secret Headquarters



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
Pokémon Species Pokémon TypeAbilities EV Yield Version
Xerneas (One-Time Only) Fairy Fairy Aura 3 HP X
Yveltal (One-Time Only) Dark/Flying Dura Aura 3 HP Y

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Team Flare Grunt $1,800 Manectric Lv. 45, Scrafty Lv. 45, Golbat Lv. 45
Team Flare Admin & Team Flare Grunt $7,840 Toxicroak Lv. 50, Liepard Lv. 48
Team Flare Admin & Team Flare Grunt $7,840 Manectric Lv. 50, Mightyena Lv. 48
Team Flare Admin & Team Flare Grunt $7,840 Houndoom Lv. 50, Scrafty Lv. 48
Team Flare Admin [Left] $4,800 Swalot Lv. 50
Team Flare Admin [Middle] $3,840 Liepard Lv. 47, Manectric Lv. 48
Team Flare Admin [Right] $3,840 Mightyena Lv. 47, Houndoom Lv. 48
Team Flare Admin [Back] $4,000 Golbat Lv. 50

As you enter the Geosenge Town's ruins, head northwest and you'll find a Team Grunt as you leave town. After the battle, continue northwest and along the path into Flare's headquarters; your rival will come along with you as well. Examine the switch in the elevator to go down a while, then exit the elevator. Within the lab, go north and you'll find Lysandre. Hammer time!

BOSS: Team Flare Lysandre

  • Rewards: $10,200

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mienshao Fighting Level 48 N/A
Honchkrow Dark/Flying Level 47 N/A
Pyroar Normal/Fire Level 49 N/A
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 51 N/A

  • Meinshao: Like most basic Fighters, this guy is weak to Psychic, Flying, and Fairy, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.

  • Honchkrow: Took 'im long enough to evolve it. Anyways, it is weak to Fairy, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Psychic. It's advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Pyroar: This kitty is weak to Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground, and is immune to Ghost. It has advantages over Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel.

  • Gyarados: It is doubly-weak to Electric, and also weak to Rock; it is immune to Ground, though. It has type-based advantages over Rock, Ground, Fire, Fighting, Grass, and Bug.

Basically, the same tactics as last time will apply. Use a Psychic- or Flying-oriented Pokémon on Mienshao, an Electric-type on Honchkrow and Gyarados, and a Water-type starter or someone with Dig on Pyroar. These will still mostly be one-hit kills, sadly enough - the main problem still results from his variety.


After the battle, go northwest and through the doorway. As you do, your rival will begin following you: there will be some Double Battles up ahead, but her presence may make them easier. (In my case, harder: most of my party outlevels hers by many levels; I mean, Delphox hit Level 71 quite recently. Oh well. At least she can provide a full healing after each fight.) After the first Double Battle, continue along to another.

Past there, Shauna will suddenly come up behind. ... Oh, that's just greeeeeat. Anyways, go south and along to another Double Battle. Far down the road from there is a door with the Team Flare emblem on it. Shauna somehow opens it up (see, slapping stuff always works) so you can go through. There, you'll find that mystical tree Lysandre was going on about earlier.

A bunch of admins appear and Shauna flees off, followed by your rival, both followed by some of the admins. That gives you four more to the take out - speak with them and beat them in any order you choose. (They're denoted in the table at the start of the section, with their orientation in the brackets.)

After beating all four Flare Admins, they'll run off leaving metaphorical trails of urine behind them.

SAVE YOUR GAME NOW, OR YOU COULD LOSE YOUR LEGENDARY POKÉMON!

After doing so, go forward and try to press the switch on the machine. Your legendary Pokémon will appear, engaging you in battle. (It's version exclusive: see the first box for Pokémon X players, and the second for Pokémon Y players.)


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER (POKÉMON X): #716 Xerneas--=
  • EV Yield: 3 HP
  • Hold Item: None

Level Level 50 Move 1 Gravity (negates Flying-types/Levitate)
Type Fairy Move 2 Geomancy (ups Specials and Speed on second turn)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Moonblast (Fairy; can lower Sp.Atk.)
Abilities Fairy Aura Move 4 Megahorn (Bug: 120 Power)

  • Xerneas: The legendary Pokémon for Pokémon X is Xerneas. It is weak to Poison and Steel, resists Fighting, Bug, and Dark, is immune to Dragon, and all else will normal damage.

As a note to you strategists and competitive people, Xerneas and Yveltal seem to be guaranteed to have 31 IVs in a random three of their stats. What does this mean? IVs will affect level growth by Level 100: for each IV in a stat, one point will be earned by then, and proportional amounts at lower levels. "Three" of their stats also includes half of their six stats. 31 points can make quite a significant difference in this game, actually. For example, you can boost that stat by getting 252 EVs and save-and-reload the game until you get an ideal Nature on the Pokémon for whatever stat it is you want. That means you can get a 103-point boost in a stat over the relatively-base value. Food for thought.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - in fact, you're pretty much forced to; even if you defeat Xerneas/Yveltal, they'll still be there in the field, waiting for you to catch them. In other words, wasting the Master Ball is that - a waste.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER (POKÉMON Y): #717 Yveltal--=
  • EV Yield: 3 HP
  • Hold Item: None

Level Level 50 Move 1 Disable (prevents a move's use)
Type Dark/Flying Move 2 Dark Pulse (Dark)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Snarl (Dark)
Abilities Dark Aura Move 4 Oblivion Wing (Flying; absorbs HP)

  • Yveltal: The legendary Pokémon for Pokémon Y is Yveltal - the cooler-looking, but less useful of the two. Anyways, it is weak to Fairy, Electric, Ice, and Rock, and takes no damage from Ground or Psychic. It resists Grass, Ghost, and Dark.

As a note to you strategists and competitive people, Xerneas and Yveltal seem to be guaranteed to have 31 IVs in a random three of their stats. What does this mean? IVs will affect level growth by Level 100: for each IV in a stat, one point will be earned by then, and proportional amounts at lower levels. "Three" of their stats also includes half of their six stats. 31 points can make quite a significant difference in this game, actually. For example, you can boost that stat by getting 252 EVs and save-and-reload the game until you get an ideal Nature on the Pokémon for whatever stat it is you want. That means you can get a 103-point boost in a stat over the relatively-base value. Food for thought.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - in fact, you're pretty much forced to; even if you defeat Xerneas/Yveltal, they'll still be there in the field, waiting for you to catch them. In other words, wasting the Master Ball is that - a waste.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)


After hopefully capturing your legendary Pokémon, Shauna and your rival will come up. Meanwhile, so does Lysandre!

BOSS: Team Flare Boss Lysandre

  • Rewards: $10,200

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mienshao Fighting Level 49 N/A
Honchkrow Dark/Flying Level 49 N/A
Pyroar Normal/Fire Level 51 N/A
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 53 N/A
Mega-Gyarados Water/Dark Level 53 Mega-Evolved his only Gyarados

  • Meinshao: Like most basic Fighters, this guy is weak to Psychic, Flying, and Fairy, and is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.

  • Honchkrow: Took 'im long enough to evolve it. Anyways, it is weak to Fairy, Rock, Ice, and Electric, and immune to Ground and Psychic. It's advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Pyroar: This kitty is weak to Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground, and is immune to Ghost. It has advantages over Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel.

  • Gyarados: It is doubly-weak to Electric, and also weak to Rock; it is immune to Ground, though. It has type-based advantages over Rock, Ground, Fire, Fighting, Grass, and Bug. The most significant feature of this battle is that Gyarados is holding Gyaradosite, an item that will indeed let it Mega Evolve...

  • Mega Gyarados: Once Gyarados almost inevitably Mega Evolves, you have a much more significant problem: notably no double weaknesses, and thusly almost no one-hit-kills. Mega Gyarados is weak to Grass, Electric, Fighting, Bug, and Fairy. It is immune to Psychic, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Psychic.

Now that you've hopefully caught your legendary Pokémon - be it Xerneas or Yveltal - you'll automatically lead with it, similar to Pokémon Black/White, for at least this battle if you chose to add it to your party. (It will be fully healed, regardless of whether you used a Heal Ball - all you're Pokémon are, in fact.) Luckily, both Pokémon have some sort of advantage over Mienshao, so that'll be easily enough to deal with. When he brings Honchkrow, you'll want to stick with Xerneas on X, or just outright switch to your Electric. As for Pyroar, stick with just whatever's good for you.

As for Gyarados? Initially, you'll want to start with a Pokémon - say, Pikachu, Raichu, Jolteon, and so on - that can move fast (perhaps enough to beat Mega Evolution? I don't know if it's first...) and use Electric moves. Combined with STAB and the double-weakness, Electric moves do six times the normal damage: Thunder would become a move of 660 Power, 726 with the Magnet on the Pokémon, almost certainly a one-hit-kill.

If you cannot beat Gyarados, or wish to just outright prepare in the off-chance it happens, bring out Xerneas or whatever Pokémon you'd spam on Water Pokémon (which may still be that Electric-type =P). Yveltal won't be much help in this battle, obviously enough, with his only advantages coming with Mienshao. Good luck.


And so, we're done. Team Flare's maniacal plot (and fashion line) has concluded, the Legendary Pokémon is hopefully sitting in your party, and we have a Champion to go find eventually. Head along to Anistar City and leave town heading southeast.



Route 18



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Poké Ball [_] Hyper potion [_] Wacan Berry [_] PP Up [_] Oran Berry [_] Ether
[_] Max Ether [_] Super Potion [_] Honey [_] X Defense

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Durant Steel/Bug Hustle, Swarm, Truant 2 Defense Both
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Gurdurr Fighting Guts, Sheer Force, Iron Fist 2 Attack Both
Heatmor Fire Flash Fire, Gluttony, White Smoke 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Lairon Rock/Steel Rock Head, Sturdy, Heavy Metal 2 Defense X
Pupitar Rock/Ground Shed Skin 2 Attack Y
Sandslash Ground Sand Veil, Sand Rush 2 Defense Both
Torkoal Fire White Smoke, Shell Armor 2 Defense Both
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE BUSHES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Durant Steel/Bug Hustle, Swarm, Truant 2 Defense Both
Heatmor Fire Flash Fire, Gluttony, White Smoke 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Skarmory Steel/Flying Keen Eye, Sturdy, Weak Armor 2 Defense Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Durant Steel/Bug Hustle, Swarm, Truant 2 Defense Both
Geodude Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 1 Defense Both
Heatmor Fire Flash Fire, Gluttony, White Smoke 2 Sp.Atk. Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Shuckle Bug/Rock Gluttony, Sturdy, Contrary 1 Defense, 1 Sp.Def. Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Youngster Jayden $1,152 Scolipede Lv. 48, Pinsir Lv. 48
Hiker Orestes $2,800 Stunfisk Lv. 50
Battle Girl Justine $2,495 Mienshao Lv. 52
Sky Trainer Jeremy $5,000 Ninjask Lv. 46, Drifblim Lv. 48, Flygon Lv. 50
Lass Sara $1,152 Granbull Lv. 48, Dedenne Lv. 48
Black Belt Yanis $2,400 Sawk Lv. 49, Pangoro Lv. 50

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Hm, a few good ones are here. A lot of those Steel-, Rock-, and Fire-types could be helpful in the next Gym if you boost their EVs enough through some Super Training, especially Heatmor and Lairon. Shuckle is a good Pokémon in general because it's an absolute tank with a base 230 Defense and Special Defense: among the highest in all the game! Plus it can learn Power Trick to swap Attack and Defense - it'll be soft as crap, but hit like a friggin' bus! Graveler is generally good as a Ground-type and he learns Rock moves for the next Gym. Both version-exclusives are excellent once they evolve because they can learn a variety of moves and can just tear stuff up with brute force. Oh, and Mega Evolutions. Mega Evolutions are important.

As you enter the Route, go south to the signpost. Check the rock to its northeast to find a Poké Ball, then head south and hop over the ledge for a Hyper Potion. Go south, east, and north through the grass, then go back west and beat up the Youngster. From here, go northeast and Cut down the tree, then go along the path to a Wacan Berry. (It weakens supereffective Electric attacks.) Skate down the rail nearby for a PP Up, then head south, over the ledge, and through the grass.

Go up the stairs you reach and battle the Hiker, then go north to the house. Within is a person challenging you to inverse battles: they can be done once daily and reverse type matchups. (What is super-effective is not very effective: Fire on a Grass/Ice type now does one-fourth, not four times, the damage - it's a helluva lot harder than it sounds.) Winning nets you an Oran Berry. Outside the house, go north along its west side and examine the cliff for an Ether, then battle the Battle Girl on the bridge to the west.

To the east is Terminus Cave, if you wish to enter. We'll detail it in the linked-to section; for now, we'll finish off the Route. Go southeast of the Inverse Battle battle house and along the tracks south and east to find a Mas Ether. If you go west and south to the end of the tracks, you can battle a Sky Trainer. Otherwise go back northwest, then downstairs. From there, go southeast and use the Dowsing Machine to find a Super Potion, then head west and south through the flowers to battle a Lass. (In the lone empty tile, in the northeast corner of the flowers, you can find a Honey, by the way.)

Go south and east of there to go under the railway above, then go north. You can battle a Black Belt, as well as grab an X Defense. Another entrance to the Terminus Cave is nearby: the one we'll use momentarily.

Or now. No time like the present. If you don't wanna enter, just continue south of the Lass and you'll find your way to Couriway Town easily enough.




Terminus Cave



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Dragon Scale [_] Normal Gem [_] TM31 (Brick Break) [_] Star Piece [_] Dusk Ball [_] Hyper Potion
[_] Heat Rock [_] Moon Stone [_] Escape Rope [_] Iron [_] Dusk Stone [_] X Attack
[_] Full Heal [_] Elixir [_] TM30 (Shadow Ball) [_] Max Potion [_] Dire Hit [_] Iron Plate
[_] Max Repel [_] Reaper Cloth

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Durant Steel/Bug Hustle, Swarm, Truant 2 Defense Both
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Lairon Rock/Steel Rock Head, Sturdy, Heavy Metal 2 Defense X
Pupitar Rock/Ground Shed Skin 2 Attack Y
Sandslash Ground Sand Veil, Sand Rush 2 Defense Both
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE SHADOWS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Ariados Bug/Poison Insomnia, Swarm, Sniper 2 Attack Both
Noibat Dragon/Flying Frisk, Infiltrator. Telepathy 1 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Aron Rock/Steel Rock Head, Sturdy, Heavy Metal 1 Defense X
Durant Steel/Bug Hustle, Swarm, Truant 2 Defense Both
Geodude Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 1 Defense Both
Lervitar Rock/Ground Guts, Sand Veil 1 Attack Y
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Shuckle Bug/Rock Gluttony, Sturdy, Contrary 1 Defense, 1 Sp.Def. Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Worker Narek $3,072 Graveler Lv. 46, Graveler Lv. 47, Golem Lv. 48
Hiker Aaron $2,800 Rhydon Lv. 50
Worker Dimitri $3,200 Octillery Lv. 50
Hiker Bergin $2,668 Boldore Lv. 48, Steelix Lv. 48
Battle Girl Andrea $2,400 Throh Lv. 49, Conkeldurr Lv. 50
Black Belt Gunnar $2,400 Toxicroak Lv. 49, Sawk Lv. 50
Black Belt Ricardo $2,496 Hariyama Lv. 52
Battle Girl Hailey $2,448 Medicham Lv. 49, Hawlucha Lv. 51
Rangers Fern & Lee $8,160 Nidoking Lv. 51, Nidoqueen Lv. 51
Worker Yusif $3,200 Probopass Lv. 50

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: A lot of these remain the same as on Route 18. The most notable change concerns Noibat. Noibat is a Dragon/Flying type with rather crappy stats, centering around 40 ~ 50 on the base level. However, it evolves into a powerhouse at Level 48, at least doubling those base stats to center around 90 ~ 110. It's definitely a Pokémon worth spending your time on!

~ Lower Entrance ~

We'll assume you're following this walkthrough linearly and therefore entered through the ground-level entrance next to Black Belt Yanis (where you found the X Defense by going under the rails on Route 18). As you go in, head west and north and east into the pit to find a Dragon Scale. Snatch it up, then get out of the pit and go north, east, and north. Examine the rock in the alcove for a Normal Gem (one-time boost to a Normal move).


~ Upper Entrance: East ~

Go up the stairs near the Inverse Battle house, then follow the tracks southeast from it. They go to a different part of the Terminus Cave, where you'll find the useful TM31 - it teaches Brick Break, a Fighting-type move that can break stuff like Light Screen and Reflect!


~ Upper Entrance: West ~

Other than those, there's little point in the others entrances; go east of the Inverse Battle house on Route 18 now and enter from there. As you enter, go northeast and along the path to the next floor. At the west/east fork, go east and break through the rock with Rock Smash. Get on the bridge and cross to the other side for a Star Piece.

go west and south and over the ledges. After the second ledge, face west and examine the rock for a Dusk Ball. Go up the ramp to the west and far to the north, past the bridge. Near the Rock Smash rock, examine the rock to the northwest to find a Hyper Potion.

Cross the bridge and head along the path to battle a Worker. Beat him and go south, past the ramp, and along the path. At the end, use Rock Smash to continue on to a Heat Rock. Go back to the Worker and use the ramp to his southeast, then go across the bridge to a singing Hiker. Continue along the path and you'll find a Worker running around to the north. Defeat him and go north, past the stairs, and use Rock Smash to find a Moon Stone if you head far to the north.

We'll ignore the stairs for the moment. Just go south of the Worker and over the ledges, then go west and up the ramp to find an Escape Rope. Go south, east, and south of there to find a Hiker to battle. Then go west and over the ledges to where you found the Heat Rock; return to where you fought the previous Worker, then go north and downstairs.

Go north and defeat Andrea, then go north and break the rock via Rock Smash. Go through the maze (just hang to the south) and examine the rock almost due west of where exit to find an Iron. Go south and west from there to find a Dusk Stone. Go back to where you found the Iron, then go a little north, east, break the rock, then go east and north. Defeat the Black Belt near the intersection, then go further north and along the lengthy, narrow path to find an X Attack.

Return to the Black Belt and head southeast from there and along to another. First go east and north and along the ground-level path for a while to find a Full Heal, then return to the aforementioned Black Belt. On your way back, ascend onto the raised ledge to battle a Battle Girl. Go west and north of her, then use the eastbound ramp. Go north and grab the Elixir, then go south and east and over some ledges.

Return to the last Black Belt you fought, then go south of him. At the up/down fork, go west (down) and north along the path to find TM30 - it teaches Shadow Ball, one of the more powerful Ghost-type moves. At the end of the path next to that ramp, you'll also find a Max Potion. Go back to the fork and head east. Swerve around to the northeast side of the next two trainers and examine the rock behind them for a Dire Hit, then (Double) Battle them.

After, continue south and you'll find an east/west fork; go west to find an Iron Plate. It boosts the power of Steel moves, plus turns Arceus into a Steel-type. Go back along the other path to the stairs and on up. In the next area, go east and north and along the ramp-filled path to Yusif. As you try going to the next level, go along the skinny path eastward. Follow your Dowsing Machine to a Max Repel, then go south and over the ledges to a Reaper Cloth (Dusclops holds it in a trade to become Dusknoir).

This will finish the cave: no more progress is allowed until after the Elite Four. Grr...




Couriway Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Pretty Wing [_] Revive [_] Ether [_] Rare Candy [_] Poké Ball [_] TM89 (U-Turn)
[_] Burn Heal [_] TM55 (Scald) [_] Stealth Power Lv. 1 [_] Fresh Water/Berry [_] Prism Scale [_] Max Potion

COURIWAY TOWN POKÉMART - GENERAL
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

As you enter town, go south with the Dowsing Machine on and you'll find a Pretty Wing in the bush southwest of the Pokémon Center. Speaking of the Center, go inside and heal/shop/etc. In the house south of there, you can bring along a Pokémon who knows Nuzzle (Pikachu, for example) and use it on the kid to get a Revive.

If you try to cross the bridge to the southeast, you'll battle Professor Sycamore eventually.


BOSS: Pokémon Professor Sycamore

  • Rewards: $7,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Venusaur Grass/Poison Level 50 N/A
Charizard Fire/Flying Level 50 N/A
Blastoise Water Level 50 N/A

  • Venusaur: This final evolution of Bulbasaur is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic. He is advantageous over Rock, Ground, Water, Fairy, and Grass.

  • Charizard: This final evolution of Charmander is doubly-weak to Rock, weak to Electric, and Water, and immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Grass, Bug, Ice, Steel, and Fighting.

  • Blastoise: Finally, the final evolution of Squirtle is weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

As it stands, it'll probably be best to keep Xerneas out of this fight if you're using him: he doesn't have too many advantages. However, a Fire-type starter or Yveltal are pretty good against Venusaur. A Water starter will do sufficiently well on Charizard, as would a Rock- or Electric-type Pokémon, and Blastoise can be done in by a Grass starter or by another Electric-type.

It's nothing much more complex than you've been dealing with, really - two should be able to be killed by starters, and the third by just about whatever it's weak to: they don't cover their types well. For me, it was Delphox on Venusaur, then Pikachu on Blastoise and Charizard.


After the easy fight, go north and up the stairs to the rail station. (At the middle plateau, first, examine the northwest corner for an Ether.) At the east end, you can find a Rare Candy; you can also use the Dowsing Machine to find a Poké Ball between the last two benches. At the west end, the person there will you TM89 - it contains U-turn, a Bug-type move. (People having played Pokémon HeartGold/SoulSilver remember how annoying this was in the Azalea Gym, eh? =)) Basically, it's a Bug-type Volt Switch: you hit the opponent, then get another Pokémon sent out.

East of where you battled Sycamore, you can use the Dowsing Machine to find a Burn Heal. (Sit on the benches for a cool view!) Then cross the bridge south of where the battle occurred. In the house nearby, you can get quizzed on your starter's weight and height. (Mine were both true. >_>) The items you can get will boost moves of the Fire (for Fennekin), Water (for Froakie), or Grass (for Chespin) types by 20%. The stats for each Pokémon is below.


Starter Imperial System Metric System Reward
Height Weight Height Weight
Chespin 1'4" 19.8 lbs. 0.4 m. 9.0 kg. Miracle Seed
Fennekin 1'4" 20.7 lbs. 0.4 m. 9.4 kg. Charcoal
Froakie 1'0" 15.4 lbs. 0.3 m. 7.0 kg. Mystic Water

^sr25|

Now, go up the stairs to the east of that house. You'll find a Photo Spot at the top. In the hotel, you'll get a quiz from the boy in the northeast corner (answer: "Kelp") to get TM55 - it teaches Scald, a Water-type move that's odd in that it can cause a Burn. =P On the upper floor, per the usual, you can speak with Mr. Bonding in the southeast room to get Stealth Power Lv. 1. Outside, to the east, you can buy Fresh Water and a Berry once daily for $300. If you look carefully in the nearby screenshot, you can see a Pokéball in the corner; run over to it (the water's shallow) to get a Max Potion, and also a Prism Scale using the Dowsing Machine.

That'll do it - heal up and leave, going south of the starter-quiz house to go onto...




Route 19



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Damp Rock [_] Rare Bone [_] Escape Rope [_] Toxic Plate [_] PP Up [_] Yache Berry
[_] TM36 (Sludge Bomb) [_] Antidote [_] HP Up [_] Max Revive [_] HM05 (Waterfall) [_] Timer Ball

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE PUDDLES AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Carnivine Grass Levitate 2 Attack Both
Drapion (Grass-only) Dark/Poison Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 2 Defense Both
Haunter Ghost/Poison Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Karrablast Bug Shed Skin, Swarm, No Guard 1 Attack Both
Quagsire Water/Ground Damp, Water Absorb, Unaware 2 HP Both
Shelmet Bug Hydration, Shell Armor, Overcoat 1 Defense Both
Sliggoo Dragon Sap Sipper, Hydration, Gooey 2 Sp.Def. Both
Stunfisk (Puddles-only) Ground/Electric Limber, Static, Sand Veil 2 HP Both
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Arbok Poison Intimidate, Shed Skin, Unnerve 2 Attack Both
Gligar Ground/Flying Hyper Cutter, Sand Veil, Immunity 1 Defense Both
Skorupi Bug/Poison Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 2 Attack Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Quagsire Water/Ground Damp, Water Absorb, Unaware 2 HP Both
Stunfisk Ground/Electric Limber, Static, Sand Veil 2 HP Both
Sliggoo Dragon Sap Sipper, Hydration, Gooey 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Barboach Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 1 HP Both
Politoed Water Water Absorb, Damp, Drizzle 3 Sp.Def. Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
Whiscash Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 2 HP Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Hex Maniac Josette $1,600 Pumpkaboo Lv. 50, Pumpkaboo Lv. 50
Rangers Ivy & Orrick $8,400 Tauros Lv. 53, Miltank Lv. 53
Swimmer Coral $832 Stunfisk Lv. 52
Pokémon Ranger Clementine $4,320 Alomomola Lv. 54
Pokémon Ranger Amber $4,080 Emolga Lv. 51, Grumpig Lv. 51
Pokémon Ranger Shinobu $4,080 Zangoose Lv. 51, Beartic Lv. 51
Sky Trainer Sera $5,200 Noctowl Lv. 50, Aerodactyl Lv. 52
Fairy Tale Girl Lovelyn $1,568 Mr. Mime Lv. 49, Aromatisse Lv. 49, Azumarill Lv. 49
Pokémon Trainer Shauna $5,100 Delcatty Lv. 49, Goodra Lv. 49, [Kalos Starter Weak to Yours] Lv. 51
Pokémon Trainer Tierno $5,200 Talonflame Lv. 48, Roserade Lv. 49, Crawdaunt Lv. 52
Pokémon Trainer Trevor $5,100 Raichu Lv. 49, Aerodactyl Lv. 49, Florges Lv. 51

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Nothing exceptional worth catching here, especially given that the majority of these could have been caught on Route 14, just south of Laverre, at lower levels.

Go south and defeat the Hex Maniac, then go due east of her and examine the rock for a Net Ball. Go west and down the stairs to the marshy area - begin Surfing and head south. Once you reach land again, use the Dowsing Machine to find a Damp Rock to the southeast. Go west from there to battle some Pokémon Rangers, then battle the Swimmer to the west. Go south from there and grab the Rare Bone, then go north of the Swimmer. Surf through the water. Defeat the Pokémon Ranger, then examine the rock near her to find an Escape Rope.

Continue north and Surf through the water there to find another Ranger to battle. Go north some along ground level to find a Strength boulder. Use Strength to move it south once, east once, north twice, and east twice. This will open up the Toxic Plate, which boosts the power of Poison moves and makes Arceus become Poison-typed. Now backtrack to the previous Pokémon Ranger and go up the stairs to her west. Go through the nearby flower beds for a PP Up, then go back to the bridge. Cross it and defeat the Pokémon Ranger on the other side.

Go east to the Yache Berry tree after and grab one. (They weaken supereffective Ice attacks.) Go south and use the stairs to find TM36 - this teaches Sludge Bomb, a decent Poison-type move. After, go over the ledge nearby to return close to the start of the Route. Go southeast and up the stairs, then go east through the flowers. Approach the person atop the ledge if you want a Sky Battle. After doing it, if desired, go into the flowers to the south. Examine the only empty tile (southeast corner) to find an Antidote.

Then go south and west to find a large path of flowers. First beat the nearby Fairy Tale Girl, then go into the flowers and along the path for an HP Up. Return to the Fairy Tale Girl and hop along the obvious path to the Max Revive. Return to the Fairy Tale Girl and cross the bridge to the west. As you do so, you'll get stuck in three consecutive battles! (With healing between, of course.) They're not really marked as bosses (they're in the table above) simply because they're on-par with the Trainers here; the only one you could get confused on is Shauna, who has the starter doubly-weak to your own. So, yes, easy.

After the battles, you'll receive HM05 - it teaches Waterfall, which lets you ascend some waterfalls. Duh. Go west and finish crossing the bridge - hold on, let me ramble. Whose freakin' idea was it to have a battle on a bridge!? If you so much as use, say, Eruption or Draco Meteor, we'd all probably die from the fall! ... Anyways, after you cross the bridge, use the Dowsing Machine to navigate around to a Timer Ball before going west into Snowbelle.




Snowbelle City



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] PP Restoring Power Lv. 1 [_] TM08 (Bulk Up) [_] Full Heal [_] Icy Rock [_] Full Restore [_] X Sp. Atk.

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both Jigglypuff Bisharp Steel/Dark Defiant

SNOWBELLE CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Dusk Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Rate is x4.0 in caves or at night.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Heal Ball $300 Catches Pokémon, and fully heals them on capture. (Useless with full party.)
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Nest Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. It works better on lower-level Pokémon.
Net Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Rate is x4.0 on Bug- and Water-types.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Quick Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Its rate is x4.0 for the first four turns of battle.
Repeat Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. It's better on previously-owned species.
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Timer Ball $1,000 Catches Pokémon. Catch rate goes up by one every ten turns up to x4.0.
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

As you enter the snowy town of Snowbelle, go west and into the Pokémon Center. Heal and shop as usual, and also speak with Mr. Bonding to the west to get the PP Restoring Power Lv. 1. In the house north of there - the western of the two - you can find a Move Tutor - he can only teach to Keldeo and Meloetta, though, which you need PokéBank at this time to get from Pokémon Black/White - even then, I'm pretty sure Meloetta was event-only.

^sr26|The Mythical Move Tutor.

SNOWBELLE CITY MOVE TUTOR - MYTHICAL MOVES
Move Name Type Power Accuracy Max PP Class Targets Possible Learners
Secret Sword Fighting 85 100 10 Special One Keldeo
Relic Song Normal 75 100 10 Special One Meloetta

The Battle Girl upstairs will also give you TM08 - it teaches Bulk-Up, a move that boosts your physical stats. If you go west of the Pokémon Center, then further north past the Gym, you can find the clothing store. (As you go there, be sure to go into the lower area to the east of it, then to the end of the path and press A for a Full Heal.) Go west from there, then upstairs and into the house if you want to trade a Bisharp for a Jigglypuff - a very good deal, given that the next Gym is Ice-centric and therefore gives Bisharp an advantage. (He comes at Level 50.) If you go east from this house using the Dowsing Machine, you'll find an Icy Rock.

From the trade house, go south from there and across the bridge. When you see an ice ramp on the left, go down it and south carefully to reach a Full Restore. Go down the nearby ramp and then continue on to the house. Go due east of the door when outside and press A to find an X Sp. Atk. Within, you can find another Move Tutor. This Guy can teach your Pokémon the "Elemental Beams" - some of the most powerful moves in the game. For the Pokémon given, it will have a Power of 225 (because of STAB) - if you were to throw in a double-weakness and items like Charcoal, the power could easily be 990!


^sl27|The Elemental Beam Tutor.

SNOWBELLE CITY MOVE TUTOR - ELEMENTAL BEAMS
Move Name Type Power Accuracy Max PP Class Targets Possible Learners
Frenzy Plant Grass 150 90 5 Special One Venusaur, Meganium, Sceptile, Torterra, Serperior, Chesnaught
Blast Burn Fire 150 90 5 Special One Charizard, Typhloshion, Blaziken, Infernape, Emboar, Delphox
Hydro Cannon Water 150 90 5 Special One Blastoise, Feraligatr, Swampert, Empoleon, Samurott, Greninja

That's about it. The Gym Leader is currently not in (kinda makes me think back to Red/Blue's eighth Gym lol), so go south of the Elemental Beam Tutor's house to Route 20.



Route 20



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Kasib Berry [_] Paralyze Heal [_] Meadow Plate [_] Antidote [_] Protein [_] Repeat Ball
[_] Mental Herb [_] Tiny Mushroom [_] Balm Mushroom [_] X Accuracy [_] TM53 (Energy Ball)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Amoonguss Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 2 HP Both
Gothorita Psychic Frisk, Shadow Tag 2 Sp.Def. Both
Jigglypuff Normal/Fairy Cute Charm, Friend Guard, Competitive 2 HP Both
Noctowl Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 2 HP Both
Trevenant Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Harvest 2 Attack Both
Zoroark Dark Illusion 2 Sp.Atk. Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Sudowoodo Rock Rock Head, Sturdy, Rattled 2 Defense Both
Zoroark Dark Illusion 2 Sp.Atk. Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Twins Nana & Nina $1,696 Slurpuff Lv. 53, Aromatisse Lv. 53
Poké Fan Roisin $4,240 Snubbull Lv. 51, Granbull Lv. 53
Fairy Tale Girl Wynne $1,664 Klefki Lv. 52, Azumarill Lv. 52
Poké Fan Corey $4,320 Dedenne Lv. 54
Hex Maniac Desdomna $1,728 Trevenant Lv. 54

EEVEE & LEAFEON

As you go west into the forest from the Snowbelle side, you'll notice a large mossy rock. Leveling Eevee up near here evolves it into Leafeon, it's Grass-type Eevee-lution from Generation IV. Fair warning or good advice - take it as you will, just be careful if you're waiting for that one Eevee-lution.


POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Nothing of exceptional note here, unless you want a Psychic type in Gothorita. If you plan on doing online battling, Zoroark is epic in that its Illusion ability makes it appear as one your other party Pokémon, which can really screw with people. For example, if you have a team of Fighters, then send out Zoroark (who will appear as a Fighter), someone uses Psychic, it fails to hit, and you get in a free hit (perhaps with a Dark move against that Psychic?).

Go west as you reach the entrance of the forest and bypass the mossy rock (if you want). Go west an area and you can find a Kasib Berry tree and a Paralyze Heal to the north. The former lessens the effect of a Ghost-type supereffective move. Go back an area, then south another, then south yet another. Go east and grab the Meadow Plate: this strengthens Grass moves and makes Arceus become a Grass-type.

Go back to the previous area and go west. In the next area, defeat the Twins (or circumvent them to the south). Either way, go south to the next area. Go around to the west and use the Dowsing Machine to find the Antidote around here, then beat the Poké Fan nearby. Go back an area, then north another. Beat the nearby Fairy Tale Girl, then go west an area. Cut down the bush and defeat the Poké Fan, then go northwest. Grab the Protein, then hunt down the Repeat Ball via the Dowsing Machine to the southwest.

Go back to the previous area and go south to another area, then another. (From here, if you go to the far south, then west an area, you'll find Pokémon Village immediately.) Go east to find another tree-centric clearing; hunt down a Mental Herb with the Dowsing Machine, then go west an ar-- Huh? Okaaaaaay.... Anyways, in this area, hunt down a Tiny Mushroom through the Dowsing Machine and go south an area. Continue along to the stairs, then ascend them. Hunt down the valuable Balm Mushroom with your Dowsing Machine, then head west for an X Accuracy. Descend the stairs and go southwest; Cut down the bush and go through the shadows to the west.

Defeat the Hex Maniac, then go past her to find TM53. TM53 teaches Energy Ball, a decent Grass-type move to teach your Poké's. Go east an area, then go south and along the path. Go to the southwest exit to reach the Pokémon Village.




Pokémon Village



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Chople Berry [_] Pretty Wing [_] Pretty Wing [_] Max Ether [_] Pixie Plate [_] Honey
[_] Honey [_] Full Restore

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Amoonguss Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 2 HP Both
Ditto Normal Limber, Imposter 1 HP Both
Gothorita Psychic Frisk, Shadow Tag 2 Sp.Def. Both
Jigglypuff Normal/Fairy Cute Charm, Friend Guard, Competitive 2 HP Both
Noctowl Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 2 HP Both
Trevenant Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Harvest 2 Attack Both
Zoroark Dark Illusion 2 Sp.Atk. Both
POKÉMON FOUND IN TRASH BINS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Banette Ghost Frisk, Insomnia, Cursed Body 2 Attack Both
Garbodor Poison Stench, Sticky Hold, Aftermath 2 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Noctowl Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 2 HP Both
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Barboach Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 1 HP Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
Whiscash Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 2 HP Both

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: It's just repeats of previous areas. Zoroark still makes a pretty cool one to catch for online battling, and there's Gothorita for those needing a Psychic Pokémon. Those desperately needing a Water Pokémon may find Whiscash to be cool as well due to the Electric immunity, but he's not impressive in moves or stats. Ditto is the best feature of the area, though! Ditto is basically a breeding wild card. You can see Pokémon Breeding for the specifics, but the general idea is that you need a male and female to breed Pokémon, which kinda screws you if you got a male starter. (For every 7 males you get, only 1 is female, so you know.) However, you can just breed the Ditto and the starter (gender will be disregarded!) and breed up some starter Pokémon! It makes it very easy to get those baby Pokémon not normally found in Kalos and their parents are extremely rare. Basically, if you're looking to complete the Pokédex, stay here until you catch Ditto!!

As you enter, you'll find the Snowbelle Gym Leader, Wulfric. He'll tell you that this place is basically a secret refuge for Pokémon who were abused and ran off, or general outcasts simply due to something arbitrary. Speak with the Furfour to your west to get a Chople Berry, then with the Fletchling for a Pretty Wing. To the west, you can notice a Snorlax napping. If you go southwest from there, you'll find a Pretty Wing in the next clearing. Go southeast and onto the higher ledge, then northeast along the path to find a Max Ether.

Go back downstairs and west to the garbage bin - check them, sometimes they have items in them! (Or Pokémon...) Go west for one. Surf across the water to the west and you can find a Pixie Plate - it powers up Fairy type moves and ... well, actually, Arceus defaults to Fairy-type here. =P Use the Dowsing Machine to find a Honey to the northeast. If you Surf north and land next to the waterfall, then go east, you'll find a dude blocking a cave until you beat the Elite Four - something really good must be inside there. ;)

Hop off the ledge nearby, then go south and west to another Snorlax hut; it is unoccupied and has a hidden Honey within. You can also find a Full Restore to the northwest of there. That'll do it for here; Fly to Snowbelle, then heal up and enter the Gym.




Snowbelle City Gym



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Iceberg Badge [_] TM13 (Ice Beam)

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Ace Trainer Imelda $5,500 Sneasel Lv. 54, Cloyster Lv. 55
Ace Trainer Viktor $5,500 Delibird Lv. 54, Mamoswine Lv. 55
Ace Trainer Shannon $5,400 Cryogonal Lv. 52, Piloswine Lv. 53, Jynx Lv. 54
Ace Trainer Theo $5,500 Beartic Lv. 54, Vanilluxe Lv. 55

Begin by going forward and downstairs. Defeat the southwest Trainer first, then step on the button nearby twice. After doing so, go south and east to the blue platform. Defeat Viktor and press the button here thrice. Return to the southwestern pink platform and press the button there three more times. Cross up to the golden tile area.

Defeat the northeast Trainer. Bypass her without pressing the switch as you head west to the next Trainer. Defeat him and press this platform's button once. Return to the green platform and push the button there three times to open the path up to Wulfric.


BOSS: Gym Leader Wulfric

  • Rewards: $9,440; Iceberg Badge; TM13 (Ice Beam)

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Abomasnow Grass/Ice Level 56 N/A
Cryogonal Ice Level 55 N/A
Avalugg Ice Level 59 N/A

  • Abomasnow: This Pokémon is doubly-weak to Fire, in addition to being weak to Flying, Bug, Poison, Fighting, Rock, and Steel. (That's all, I think - it's a lot! XD) It is advantageous over Ground, Rock, Water, Flying, and Grass. It can start making it Hail with Snow Warning, damaging all but Ice-type Pokémon for 1/16 of their max HP per turn: that's the only legitimate danger presented to you here if you're planning on sweeping this joint.

  • Cryogonal & Avalugg: These Pokémon are weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting. They're advantageous over Flying, Ground, and Grass. Cryogonal also is immune to Ground due to Levitate. (They're grouped together because of lack of notability.)

This Gym suffers from a pretty fatal flaw - I mean, sure, when you have a Gym centered on a type, this will happen. However, Ice is one of those types that can't combat most of the Pokémon that are strong against it: Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting all have mostly irrefutable advantages in this Gym. *shrug* Whatever floats Wulfric's iceberg.

Anyways, you can sweep this Gym with any Pokémon of those types: Delphox, Chesnaught, Charizard, Machoke, Machamp, Graveler, Golem, Onix, Steelix, Doublade, Aegislash, Flareon... Need I go on? This will definitely be the easiest of all eight Gym Battles, so just sit back and relax. Pokémon around Level 55 ~ 60 will do fine in here, though mine are closer to Level 80 by now simply because I've used them since the start. (That includes my starter.)


After the battle, you'll receive the Iceberg Badge - it allows the use of Waterfall, and makes  all Pokémon, regardless of level, obey you. You'll also receive TM13 - it teaches Ice Beam, a move of 95 Power and 100 Accuracy that is great to teach to any Pokémon who can learn it.

So, that's it... All eight Kalos Gyms have given us their Badges.

It's time to take on the Pokémon League!


BACKTRACKING FOR ITEMS!

Need some extra items? How 'bout some extra EXP. from Trainers? Or do you just wanna be sure the game's 100% complete? With the gaining of the Iceberg Badge, you can go to areas with Waterfalls and ascend them with the move of the same name. Click on the links below to go to the appropriate end-of-walkthrough sections for them (it was the only place they logically fit to me >_>).





To Be a Champion



Sectional Flowchart






Leaving Snowbelle - Route 21



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Insect Plate [_] Guard Spec. [_] Pearl String [_] Repeat Ball [_] Figy Berry [_] Elixir
[_] PP Up [_] Rare Candy [_] TM22 (SolarBeam)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Altaria Dragon/Flying Natural Cure, Cloud Nine 2 Sp.Def. Both
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Scyther Bug/Flying Swarm, Technician, Steadfast 1 Attack Both
Spinda Normal Own Tempo, Tangled Feet, Contrary 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Ursaring Normal Guts, Quick Feet, Unnerve 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Scyther Bug/Flying Swarm, Technician, Steadfast 1 Attack Both
Spinda Normal Own Tempo, Tangled Feet, Contrary 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Swablu Normal/Flying Natural Cure, Cloud Nine 1 Sp.Def. Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Dratini Dragon Shed Skin, Marvel Scale 1 Attack Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Dragonair Dragon Shed Skin, Marvel Scale 2 Attack Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Ace Trainer Mireille $5,600 Sableye Lv. 56, Crustle Lv. 56
Ace Duo Elina & Sean $11,400 Wailord Lv. 57, Vileplume Lv. 57
Veteran Louis $7,980 Hippowdon Lv. 55, Aurorus Lv. 57
Ace Trainer Evan $5,800 Chandelure Lv. 58
Veteran Trisha $8,260 Tyrantum Lv. 59
Ace Trainer Robbie $5,700 Carbink Lv. 56, Raichu Lv. 56, Kingdra Lv. 57

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Perhaps "Yay!" sums it up? Scyther is a great Pokémon for you to catch: it hits hard and moves fast to say the least, and is better if you can evolve it (trade when holding Metal Coat), although it's not really necessary to make 'im a great Pokémon. Dratini and Dragonair are also huge highlights of the Route, in that they can become Dragonite, a great Pokémon: he has both statistics and move variety favoring him; he can be your jack-of-all-trades if you don't (and likely you don't) have Mew. Finally, there's Altaria. He's like a Dragonite for those who don't want to waste time fishing, I suppose - he has a decent variety of moves and sufficient stats to take on the Elite Four alongside your best, but I still prefer Dragonite. Spinda is one I'm not going to note because it's good (like the others, he's "meh"). Rather, he's trivially interesting: he has more Formes than any other Pokémon, somewhere around eight ... it's either million or billion. It's a lot. A lot. Lot.

Before you do anything, if you want some extra items regarding Waterfall's newfound ability to be used, see the end of the previous section in the blue box just after the strategy for fighting Wulfric: it contains some notes and links.

After finishing off the Pokémon Gym in Snowbelle (and doing some Waterfall-based item hunting, I hope!), heal up and leave heading west onto Route 21. (You can probably Fly to Santalune and skip around through Route 22, but Route 21 is better in general for you.)

As you enter the Route, go west and defeat the Trainer past the bridge. Go back east to the water and Surf along it. At the end, you can find a bit a land on which there is an Insect Plate - it powers up Bug mvoes and makes Arceus a Bug-type. Return to where you fought Mireille and go along the dirt road to soon find two Ace Trainers to Double Battle against. After doing so, head northeast and examine the rock to find a Guard Spec., then go east to the Strength boulder. Slap it eastward thrice and then go back and push it west once, then north into the hole. Cross over to the stairs and defeat the Veteran atop it.

^sr28|The Draco Meteor tutor.

Go northeast to the Move Tutor's house. Within, you can have some Pokémon have Draco Meteor - the ones I'm unsure of but suspect they could are marked with "(?)".


ROUTE 21 MOVE TUTOR - DRACO METEOR
Move Name Type Power Accuracy Max PP Class Targets Possible Learners
Draco Meteor Dragon 140 90 5 Special One Dratini, Dragonair, Dragonite, Kingdra, Vibrava, Flygon, Altaria, Bagon, Shelgon, Salamence, Latias, Latios, Rayquaza, Gible, Gabite, Garchomp, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Arceus, Axew, Fraxure, Haxorus, Druddigon, Deino, Zweilous, Hydreigon, Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyurem, Dragalge (?), Tyrunt (?), Tyrantum, Goomy (?), Sliggoo (?), Goodra (?), Noibat (?), Noivern (?), Zygarde (?)

Once you're done, go west and use the Dowsing Machine to find a valuable Pearl String, then Surf across the nearby water channel. You'll find a Repeat Ball on the other side, as well as a bush to Cut down. Do so and get the Figy Berry. Backtrack all of the way to the Ace Trainer Duo and go up the steps to their northwest. There, you can see the gatehouse linking Route 21, Route 22, and Victory Road. Go on if you desire.

However, see that sandy ramp to the south? Go down there and battle the Ace Trainer to the southwest. Continue southwest and get on the upper ledge. Go west along it and Cut down the tree and continue along to fight a Veteran. Grab the Elixir nearby after the fight, then backtrack to Evan. Go southwest and Cut down that tree and go along the path. As you begin turning east, be sure to examine the southwestern of the two small rocks to find a PP Up, then go east to two Strength boulders. Push the western of the two west as far as possible, then repeat with the other of the two. Push the latter one south into the hole. Then return to the first and push it east into the hole over there.

Go over the boulder to the southwest to find another. Push it southward twice, then go around to the Veteran from before and push the boulder eastward into the hole. Continue to the water and Surf eastward to eventually find some land appearing to the south: you can find a Rare Candy there! Surf back west and land on the northern shore where a Cut tree lies; Cut 'er down, then go all of the way to push the boulder into the hole. Go around to another boulder; move it north thrice, then east twice to fill another hole.

Cross it and you'll find TM22. TM22 teaches SolarBeam: it is a high-Power Grass-type move. Normally, it takes a turn to charge it up and another to use it, but if the weather is Sunny, this can be circumvented: if you had a Groudon, for example, you'd never need to wait. (Seriously, that's a great move for Groudon, being weak to Water which is weak to SolarBeam.) A number of Fire-type Pokémon like Charizard (Charizardite Y FTW!) can sometimes also learn it. Weird.

Anyways, backtrack to the gate by heading north, over the ledge, then northwest. Head west and north to the dude blocking you from entering Victory Road to battle him. *shrug* His loss. After winning, continue on! (Although I recommend healing up or something elsewhere first, just to be safe. It's a long 'un, with a lot of Trainers.)




Victory Road



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] X Attack [_] Dusk Ball [_] Hyper Potion [_] Full Heal [_] Carbos [_] Smooth Rock
[_] Ultra Ball [_] TM03 (Psyshock) [_] Rare Candy [_] PP Up [_] Revive [_] Quick Ball
[_] Max Revive x5 [_] Zinc [_] Pretty Wing [_] Max Elixir [_] Escape Rope [_] Max Repel
[_] Dragon Fang [_] Full Restore [_] X Defense [_] Max Elixir [_] TM02 (Dragon Claw)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM IN THE CAVERNS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Druddigon Dragon Rough Skin, Sheer Force, Mold Breaker 2 Attack Both
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Gurdurr Fighting Guts, Sheer Force, Iron Fist 2 Attack Both
Lickitung Normal Oblivious, Own Tempo, Cloud Nine 2 HP Both
Zweilous Dark/Dragon Hustle 2 Attack Both
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN SHADOWS IN THE CAVERNS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Ariados Bug/Poison Insomnia, Swarm, Sniper 2 Attack Both
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Noibat Dragon/Flying Frisk, Infiltrator. Telepathy 1 Speed Both
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN SHADOWS OUTSIDE THE CAVERNS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Fearow Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Sniper 2 Speed Both
Hydreigon Dark/Dragon Levitate 3 Sp.Atk. Both
Skarmory Steel/Flying Keen Eye, Sturdy, Weak Armor 2 Defense Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Druddigon Dragon Rough Skin, Sheer Force, Mold Breaker 2 Attack Both
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Geodude Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 1 Defense Both
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Gurdurr Fighting Guts, Sheer Force, Iron Fist 2 Attack Both
Lickitung Normal Oblivious, Own Tempo, Cloud Nine 2 HP Both
Teddiursa Normal Pickup, Quick Feet, Honey Gather 1 Attack Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Graveler Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Sand Veil 2 Defense Both
Shuckle Bug/Rock Gluttony, Sturdy, Contrary 1 Defense, 1 Sp.Def. Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
Poliwrath Water/Fighting Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 3 Defense Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Ace Trainer Alanza $6,000 Weavile Lv. 60
Ace Trainer Bence $5,700 Steelix Lv. 56, Electrode Lv. 56, Kangaskhan Lv. 57
Black Belt Markus $2,880 Machamp Lv. 60
Battle Girl Veronique $2,784 Hawlucha Lv. 57, Mienshao Lv. 58
Backpacker Farid $2,320 Haxorus Lv. 58
Battle Girl Sigrid $2,880 Medicham Lv. 60
Black Belt Ander $2,784 Pangoro Lv. 57, Heracross Lv. 58
Psychic William $3,248 Espeon Lv. 58
Brains & Brawn Arman & Hugo $6,240 Medicham Lv. 58, Gallade Lv. 60
Fairy Tale Girl Corinne $1,792 Azumarill Lv. 56, Florges Lv. 56
Hex Maniac Raziah $1,856 Gourgeist Lv. 58
Pokémon Ranger Petra $4,560 Slowbro Lv. 57, Altaria Lv. 57
Veteran Inga $8,540 Talonflame Lv. 61
Pokémon Ranger Ralf $4,720 Crobat Lv. 59
Veteran Gerard $8,260 Banette Lv. 57, Leafeon Lv. 59
Artist Vincent $3,248 Smeargle Lv. 58
Ace Trainer Michele $5,800 Macargo Lv. 57, Scizor Lv. 58
Hiker Corwin $3,136 Torkoal Lv. 56, Golem Lv. 56
Veteran Timeo $8,260 Trevenant Lv. 57, Gigalith Lv. 59
Veteran Catrina $8,260 Glaceon Lv. 57, Snorlax Lv. 59
Veteran Gilles $7,980 Skarmory Lv. 55, Umbreon Lv. 55, Alakazam Lv. 57

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: To be honest, it's a bit too late to be picking any Pokémon for the Elite Four: without some serious grinding in battles or Super Training, you probably won't get enough EVs out of them to bring them to a better potential than your party - one that's been constructed beforehand. Still, if you're missing key pieces of your party, here you go. A Dragon-type will be the main one you need: Noivern (once evolved from Noibat) will hit like a truck and is good, and the same can be said for Druddigon and Hydreigon. Shuckle isn't too bad in that way, either, if you can boost his HP and teach him Power Swap: that really gets things a rollin'. Other than those, you'll have to pretty much go back to previous Routes and fill out what you're missing.

Gotta say, that's one epic way to open up Victory Road. >:)

Begin by going north inside the cavern and you'll soon battle an Ace Trainer. (Seriously? You came to Victory Road for some peace and quiet?) Defeat her, then head west and begin Surfing. Simply cross to the other side and go north; use your Dowsing Machine to find an X Attack, then go continue upstairs to the north and defeat another Trainer. Go up the stairs to the west and make your mark on the Black Belt, and rinse-'n'-repeat with the Battle Girl to the south.

From there, go around the water and snatch up the Dusk Ball, then backtrack to where you fought the Black Belt. From there, go west and outside through the door. Go north and across the bridge, battling the Backpacker you find partway. Continue north once on the other side; while doing so, examine the second rock you see to the left near the cliff edge to get a Hyper Potion. Continue along the dirt path. As you near the caverns again, your Dowsing Machine will go off, indicating a Full Heal in the bush just to the west. Go inside now.

Within, defeat the nearby Battle Girl, then it's time to hop across some ledges. Try to stick to the far west side and you'll reach a platform; go north and east there. Defeat the Black Belt and go up the stairs to find a Carbos in plain sight, plus a Smooth Rock hidden nearby. Backtrack to the Black Belt and go south from him, past the Strength boulder, to find a boulder you can Rock Smash. Do so, then go downstairs - head west and north along the narrow path you rounded earlier to find an Ultra Ball in the rock at the end. Make your way to the southeast portion of the peg maze to find a path going east; follow it, then go upstairs and cross two more pegs. Go to the end of the excessively featureless path to find TM03 - it teaches Psyshock, a fairly decent Psychic-type move.

Backtrack waaaay back now to where you hit rock with Rock Smash, going to ground level in the peg maze. (It's still just south of that Black Belt/Strength boulder duo.) Go east and up the stairs. then go north and hop across the peg. Defeat the Psychic to the east on the other side, then go downstairs and just keep moving that Strength boulder west: push it! Go up the stairs past the hole it soon falls into, then defeat the two Trainers nearby in a Double Battle. Head northeast to the bridge, then ignore it and go along the path to the north to eventually reach the ever-useful Rare Candy.

Backtrack to the bridge again and cross it, then go north and upstairs, then east and outside. Defeat the Fairy Girl to the east (weird place for so young a Trainer) and north to a Hex Maniac (weird place for so insane a person). Break the cracked rock wall between the two and a little west to find a PP Up further west. Then go south of the Fairy Girl and push the Strength boulder into the hole. Examine the second rock to the west for a Revive, then go into the cave to the west if you need a quick shortcut - in fact, go along the path and push in the boulder near the end anyways, just in case. (You shouldn't go back just to heal, though: someone will appear soon to facilitate that.)

Now, back to business... Go back north of the Fairy Girl and east of the Hex Maniac to find a Pokémon Ranger. She'll heal you if needed/wanted/just because. Go northeast and grab the Quick Ball, then go south. As you almost leave the stone structure, your rival comes.

Okay. Let's do it. >:)


BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $6,100

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 57 N/A
Altaria Dragon/Flying Level 57 N/A
Absol Dark Level 59 N/A
Jolteon Electric Level 57 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Delphox Fire/Psychic Level 61 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Flareon Fire Level 57 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Greninja Water/Dark Level 61 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Vaporeon Water Level 57 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Chesnaught Grass/Fighting Level 61 Your Kalos starter is Froakie

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this Pokémon. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psychic for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Altaria: This Pokémon is probably the best in her team. It has a double-weakness to Ice, and a normal one to Fairy and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground.

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug.

  • Jolteon: This guy is weak to Ground, and probably can use Volt Absorb to nullify Electric attacks. Its primary advantages are against Flying and Water.

  • Flareon: This Eevee-lution is weak to Ground, Rock, and Water, and could use Flash Fire to null Fire attacks. It's advantageous over Steel, Bug, Ice, and Grass.

  • Vaporeon: The final Eevee-lution of your rival's is weak to Grass and Electric, and probably nulls Water through Water Absorb. Its advantages are over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Delphox: Delphox is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark. Its moves give it an advantage over Steel, Ice, Grass, Bug, Poison, and Fighting. Do note that Psychic cannot hit Dark.

  • Greninja: As for Greninja, this is probably a little problematic for those of you who chose Fennekin. (Poor me!) It is weak to Grass, Electric, Fighting, Bug, and Fairy, and is immune to Psychic. It will have type-based advantages over Ground, Fire, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic.

  • Chesnaught: Finally, Chesnaught would be the easiest of the starters. It is doubly-weak to Flying, as weak as being weak to Fire, Ice, Poison, Psychic, and Fairy. Its moves give it advantages over Ground, Rock, Water, Normal, Ice, Steel, and Dark. Note, however, Fighting cannot hit Ghost, and most Ghosts are paired with the Steel, Fire, or Poison types, so that's really helpful.

The usual crap applies to her regulars: spam Flying on Chesnaught, then general weaknesses for the starters. These should be able to be facilitated by your Kanto starter, so there's little to mention there. Good alternates for Delphox would be Haunter, Gengar, and Lapras; for Greninja, Pikachu, Raichu, Jolteon, and Xerneas; for Chesnaught, Xerneas, Flareon, Haunter, and Gengar, just to name off a few for each. (Seriously, it's hard to not have something they're weak to.)

For Meowstic, Pokémon Y players will enjoy spamming Yveltal, while X may have to settle for Haunter, Gengar, Absol, or just a general starter: you'll usually one-hit this one. (Plus, Delphox can learn Shadow Ball, so that's a plus, eh?) The same can be said for her Absol: Pokémon X players can spam Xerneas, while Y will have to go for Machoke, Machamp, Scyther, Scizor, or just another general starter or someone that can learn Brick Break or Power-Up Punch.

And, finally, the Eevee-lutions. You'll usually need something outside of your normal team to deal with them. Pokémon that can learn Dig can usually get rid of Flareon and Volteon easily enough, and Vaporeon can be taken out by something basic like Pikachu, Jolteon, and the like: there's nothing really hard to deal with about the Eevee-lutions.

So, we finally come down to Altaria... For this one, you should probably still the Lapras you hopefully have been using Surf on, just another outright Ice Pokémon you found while going around northeastern Kalos. (Brrr...) Pretty much all of those are capable of learning the Ice Beam you got from the Snowbelle Gym, so it's all good.

Again, we will find ourselves in another easy rival battle. The ideal level is around Level 60~65 by this point, though I'm topping Level 85 on my Delphox. Geez... Completionism gets rid of all the fun. =P


After the battle, you'll receive five Max Revives and you'll watch a bit of some sappy scene. Bleh.

Anyways, back to the whole becoming-the-best-Trainer-in-the-Kalos-region-just-because-we're-allowed-to-do-so business. Backtrack to the Pokémon Ranger to the north and west to heal up, then go back to where the rival battle occurred and go south to exit this stone structure. (I just realized that these rival fights normally occur in Victory Road closer to the end, if not right outside/inside the Pokémon League. Are we close?) Once through, continue along to the west/east fork. Go west and Rock Smash the wall you soon reach to get the Zinc beyond it.

Go back to the fork and head east and through the doorway to re-enter the cavern. Go east and upstairs to find a Pokémon Ranger, and she ain't as nice as before! Now, as you can see, there are two sets of southbound ledges nearby. Use the eastern set to go along to some stairs; use them to leave the cave. Outside, use the Dowsing Machine to find a Pretty Wing nearby, then go north to the Max Elixir. Slide down the westbound ramp and return into the cave.

Return to the Pokémon Ranger, Petra, and use the eastern ledges. Continue south two more ledges, then use an eastbound ledge and flip on the Dowsing Machine for an Escape Rope. Go over the next eastbound ledge and go upstairs: head north at the tri-branched fork. Use the Dowsing Machine to navigate to a Max Repel, then fight the nearby Veteran. Go west after the battle and use the southbound ramp at the end of the path. Jump over the next ledge for a Dragon Fang, then go south over another ledge and upstairs.

Go south from here and defeat the Pokémon Ranger; continue southwest after to steal a Full Restore. Return to the tri-branched fork one more time and defeat the Veteran to the east and atop the stairs. Head south and push that Strength boulder into the hole using ... well, Strength. Duh. Go along the path to another such boulder; push it in, too. This creates a second shortcut back to the start of Victory Road, if you need it. Backtrack to the Veteran and go east and outside.

Don't wanna fall off here, eh heh ... heh... *shudder* Don't worry, not much more to go! Anyways, defeat the Artist to the south - this one I just know is meant to represent Vincent van Gogh! (... Right?) Examine the southwestern of the two rocks to his south for an X Defense, then cross the bridge. Head west as the path does to encounter an Ace Trainer to battle. Continue west and north to find that the bridge is out (probably by design). Surf northeast and use Waterfall on the waterfall to ascend.

Go to the end of the path, then onto the land to the east (that's starboard for you landlubbers) to battle a Hiker. Continue east, using the Dowsing Machine to hunt down a Max Elixir, then go north and pick up the TM. It is TM02, which teaches Dragon Claw, a decent move you may want to teach whatever Pokémon, Dragon or not, that can learn it: the more Poké's that you have that can beat these reptilian freaks, the better.

Go back to the waterfall you ascended, then descend. (Wheee~!) Enter the cave just to the west of it and land to the north. You'll fight three Veterans in sequence before being allowed out of here.




Pokémon League - Preparations


POKÉMON LEAGUE POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

So, dude (or dudette), congratulations on making it here, to the pinnacle of Kalosian Pokémon Training: the Pokémon League, the target of every Trainer where they can prove their worth and deem themself the best Pokémon Trainer in their entire region. Just five more consecutive battles separate you and the title of Champion (plus a lot of other goodies), and the Elite Four aren't called that just because it sounds cool. You'll need to be prepared.

First, we will discuss items. It shouldn't be too hard to amass a crapton of items after all the battles from Victory Road, especially if you have used the Amulet Coin like me - I had about $500,000 to spend by the time I came here, though you probably have a little less. Anyways, I recommend buying the following:


  • Full Restores x15 - The rare occasion when you hit a status on low HP
  • Max Potion x25 - The more-often event of being on low HP; skip this if no Pokémon has over 250 HP
  • Full Heal x15 - Statuses are rare, but prevention is great
  • Hyper Potion x40 - Healing between battles
  • Revive x15 - You'll want to favor your Max Revives in-battle, though!


Next, team building. Similar to the Pokémon League as starting in Pokémon Black/White, you can start with any of the Elite Four and slay 'em in any order you desire; the Champion will come last, however. Each of the Elite Four specializes in one type, while the Champion is definitely varied by design.

  • Elite Four Malva: This trainer specializes in using Fire-types. Those who chose Froakie or Squirtle as their starters will do well enough here. Froakie - now Greninja - will do especially well, perhaps to the point of sweeping. Also recommended would be the Lapras from long ago.

  • Elite Four Wikstrom: This trainer specializes in Steel-types: that's leaves little room for error in choosing who go for on this guy, given their mass resistances. Fire Pokémon will reign supreme here; however, Delphox and Charizard and Blaziken (for those using the Torchic event from the X/Y launch) will meet with trouble at some point. They should be allied by someone who can use a Fighting move like Brick Break and someone who can use a Ghost move. For these, you can probably teach to the named directly, or use Haunter/Gengar or Pangoro.

  • Elite Four Drasna: This trainer is the one I've been building you up to for most of the game for those of you religiously using this. (Thanks.) Dragons always give the most trouble, simply because they're varied in movesets, and Dragon cyclically is super-effective to Dragon. Pokémon able to use Ice moves are the most recommended: for this purpose, I was using Lapras. Those wanting to use a Dragon, such as Dragonite, will want to make sure it's high-level (Level 70+) so as to not get killed out there. Those playing Pokémon X can also bring in Xerneas: he is immune to Dragon, but Fairy deals extra damage to Dragon. >:) Fairy-types may be the best bet if you've been raising some.

  • Elite Four Siebold: This guy will likely be the easiest, as he specializes in Water-types. A Grass-type and an Electric-type are musts to bring along so as to abuse his Pokémon's double-weaknesses: that means Chesnaught, Venusaur, Carnivine, or Victreebel paired with Pikachu/Raichu, Jolteon, Magneton, or the like. The other two will fall easily enough.

  • The Champion: She will definitely be varied, I'll you that much... The aforementioned Electric, Ice, Fairy, and Fire Pokémon take care of five of her six. The final one will be a bit complicated. For it, I would recommend Haunter, Gengar, Doublade, and Aegislash, though.

So, my ideal party?

Pokémon Works Well Against
Lapras Drasna, Malva, Wikstrom, Champion
Haunter/Gengar Siebold, Malva, Wikstrom, Champion
Pikachu/Raichu Siebold, Malva, Champion
Kanto Starter Wikstrom/Champion if Fire, Siebold/Champion if Grass, Malva/Wikstrom/Champion if Water
Kalos Starter Wikstrom/Drasna/Champion if Fire, Malava/Wikstrom/Siebold/Champion if Grass, Malva/Wikstrom/Siebold/Champion if Water
Xerneas or Dragonite Pretty much anyone, depending on moveset

And the party I'm using? It obviously isn't quite near what I wanted above, even though that is ideal. It still works for me. (And, yes, Lapras was an HM slave. Somehow worked out to usefulness.)

Pokémon Level Move 1 Move 2 Move 3 Move 4
Delphox Level 84 Flamethrower Psychic Fire Pledge Shadow Ball
Pikachu Level 77 Thunderbolt Brick Break Thunder Strength
Blaziken Level 78 Shadow Claw Rock Slide Sky Uppercut Blaze Kick
Pidgeot Level 68 Air Slash Hurricane Toxic U-Turn
Venusaur Level 68 Petal Blizzard Sludge Bomb Dig Grass Pledge
Lapras Level 62 Rock Smash Waterfall Ice Beam Surf

Okay, then. I believe that covers it.

Ready to become a Champion?




Pokémon League - Elite Four & Champion



NOTE

When using the strategies, I will be referencing the Pokémon (ideal listing) listed at the end of the previous section, since you are more than able to get that set or substitute in reasonably compatible ones for them.


As you take the lengthy journey into the center chamber, you'll meet Malva, the Fire-specialist. She'll introduce you to the concept before everything gets underway.

Anyhow, there are four chambers.



After fighting all of them, you'll fight the Pokémon League Champion - good luck, and let's begin.

Northwest - Ironworks Chamber
BOSS: Elite Four Wikstrom

  • Rewards: $13,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Klefki Steel/Fairy Level 63 N/A
Probopass Steel/Rock Level 63 N/A
Scizor Steel/Bug Level 63 N/A
Aegislash Steel/Ghost Level 65 N/A

  • Klefki: This cute li'l guy is weak to Fire and Ground, and is immune to Poison and Dragon. It also is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Fairy, Fighting, Dark, and Dragon. Pretty much use your Fire starter here if you can; Pikachu/Raichu will suffice, as would something I didn't explicitly recommend, like Steelix.

  • Probopass: This chunk o' stuff is doubly weak to both Fighting and Ground, normally weak to Water, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Ice, Rock, Bug, Flying, and Fire. Here, your generic "Fighting move" Pokémon will work well. Pikachu/Raichu can learn Brick Break, for example, and some of the starters can learn Dig.

  • Scizor: This buzzer is doubly weak to Fire, which is his only weakness, and is immune to Poison. He is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Psychic, Grass, and Dark. Well ... this mostly implies the use of a Fire starter, right? Anything that will hit for neutral damage but abuse STAB - like Water with Lapras, or Electric with Pikachu/Raichu - will also work, but Fire is the main one.

  • Aegislash: Ah, this ... whatever you call him. He is weak to Fire, Ground, Ghost, and Dark, and takes no damage from Normal, Poison, or Fighting. He is advantageous over Ice, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic. This is the battle where you can send in a Fire-type starter (preferably not Delphox without Shadow Ball) or Haunter/Gengar if you're willing to use a powerful attack. Whichever Pokémon you use may die, so be ready to send in something else, like that starter that's able to use Dig, or Pikachu/Raichu/Lapras for neutral+STAB damage.



Northeast - Blazing Chamber
BOSS: Elite Four Malva

  • Rewards: $13,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Pyroar Normal/Fire Level 63 N/A
Chandelure Ghost/Fire Level 63 N/A
Torkoal Fire Level 63 N/A
Talonflame Fire/Flying Level 65 N/A

  • Pyroar: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground, and takes no damage from Ghost. It is advantageous over Bug, Grass, Ice, and Steel. Here, the best Pokémon to use would be the Lapras or a Water starter.

  • Chandelure: This Pokémon is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark; it takes no damage from Normal or Fighting. It is also advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Bug, Ice, Grass, and Steel. The best Pokémon for this one continues to be Lapras, although on the off-chance you have Greninja, he's a bit better.

  • Torkoal: This steamy guy is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and has advantages to Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel. The essence of Fire types, it'll probably best to stick with Lapras or a Water starter on this guy.

  • Talonflame: The flying Talonflame is doubly-weak to Rock, weak to Water and Electric, and takes no damage from Ground. It has an advantage over Grass, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Fighting. It will probably be best to stick with Greninja on this one if you can, or Lapras. Of course, if you've brought along Graveler, Golem, or another Pokémon with good Rock-type moves, that obviously takes priority.



Southeast - Flood Chamber
BOSS: Elite Four Siebold

  • Rewards: $13,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Clawitzer Water Level 63 N/A
Starmie Water/Psychic Level 63 N/A
Gyarados Water/Flying Level 63 N/A
Barbaracle Water/Rock Level 65 N/A

  • Clawitzer: Siebold will open with a basic Water type; they're weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground. For the most part, just sticking with Pikachu/Raichu or a Grass starter will suffice.

  • Starmie: Starmie is weak to Grass, Electric, Dark, Bug, and Ghost, and has advantages over Fighting, Poison, Rock, Fire, and Ground. Again, Pikachu/Raichu work fine; I'd avoid the Grass starter, since Starmie will have an advantage over one of their types. Greninja works cool due to being part-Dark, and Haunter/Gengar are part-Ghost. (I recommend the latter if an Electric-type isn't available since their STAB on a Shadow Ball may kill.)

  • Gyarados: This guy is doubly-weak to Electric, normally weak to Rock, and takes no damage from Ground. You know the drill from fighting Lysandre: send out an Electric-type and move on.

  • Barbaracle: This guy is doubly-weak to Grass, normally weak to Electric, Fighting, and Ground, and has advantages over Fire, Rock, Ground, Flying, Ice, and Bug. For this one, send out a Grass starter if possible; otherwise, Pikachu/Raichu will suffice.



Southwest - Dragonmark Chamber
BOSS: Elite Four Drasna

  • Rewards: $13,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Dragalge Dragon/Poison Level 63 N/A
Altaria Dragon/Flying Level 63 N/A
Druddigon Dragon Level 63 N/A
Noivern Dragon/Flying Level 65 N/A

On a general level, for this battle, Xerneas and Dragonite will end up being the ones you prefer. Xerneas is obviously preferred due to Fairies being immune to Dragon, but if you're on Pokémon Y and can't trade (lots of people seem to offer Yveltal up on the GTS for Xerneas, if that's available to you), there's always Dragonite, Noivern, Hydreigon, and so on. Plus, Lapras to use Ice Beam in general as well.

  • Dragalge: For this one, you'll find weaknesses to Psychic, Ground, Dragon, Fairy, and Ice, plus advantages to Dragon and Grass. When fighting, do try to avoid contact as you could get Poisoned.

  • Altaria: This puffball (sorta) is doubly-weak to Ice, weak to Rock, Fairy, and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.

  • Druddigon: A simple Pokémon, it is weak to Ice, Fairy, and Dragon, and has advantages over Dragon.

  • Noivern: Finally, we find the stat-heavy Noivern. It is doubly-weak to Ice, weak to Rock, Fairy, and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.



Pokémon League Champion
BOSS: Champion Diantha

  • Rewards: $16,320

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Level 64 N/A
Aurorus Rock/Ice Level 65 N/A
Gourgeist Ghost/Grass Level 65 N/A
Tyrantrum Rock/Dragon Level 65 N/A
Goodra Dragon Level 66 N/A
Gardevoir Psychic/Fairy Level 68 N/A - does Mega-Evolve, though

  • Hawlucha: Diantha's opener is weak to Psychic, Fairy, Ice, Electric, and Flying, and is immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, Bug, Grass, and Fighting. For this battle, Delphox, Xerneas, and Pikachu/Raichu make up the recommended ones to use.

  • Aurorus: This Fossil Pokémon is doubly-weak to Fighting and Steel, weak to Water, Grass, Ground, and Rock, and immune to Poison. It has type-based advantages over Grass, Flying, Ground, Bug, and Fire. Here, a generic starter (or Pikachu/Raichu) knowing Brick Break or Power-Up Punch will work well; if you have some Pokémon knowing a Steel move, that also is good.

  • Gourgeist: This weird Pokémon is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Ghost, and Dark, and takes no damage from Normal or Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Rock, Water, and Ground. Pretty much anything hitting its main weakness will work fine: just try to avoid Delphox, since it may not in a one-hit kill as easily as Haunter/Gengar because they get STAB. Greninja is also a very good choice, since it resists Ghost.

  • Tyrantrum: The other Fossil is weak to Ice, Fighting, Ground, Dragon, and Fairy. It is advantageous over Fire, Bug, Flying, Ice, and Dragon. The ideal Pokémon here is Xerneas due to the immunity to Dragon and advantage over it. Otherwise, there is a generic (non-Fire) starter for Brick Break or Power-Up Punch, and the same for Pikachu/Raichu, or just Dig. If you feel Lapras could get in an easy one-hit-kill Ice Beam or Blizzard due to STAB, go for it.

  • Goodra: A plain Dragon, Goodra is weak to Ice, Fairy, and Dragon and advantageous over Dragon. Xerneas is the ideal one here, though Dragonite and the like could probably get in a one-hit-kill through STAB. Lapras would be the one to use after Xerneas, though, because of Ice Beam/Blizzard also being STAB on it.

  • Gardevoir: Expect this one to Mega-Evolve: it's mostly for show, as nothing really changes beyond its statistical prowess. It will be weak to Poison, Ghost, and Steel, and immune to Dragon. It will have advantages over Dragon, Fighting, Dark, and Poison. For the most part, this will not affect your starter Pokémon unless you use the Charizard Mega-Evolution with Charizardite X or use Chesnaught, so you could go stylishly with a pseudo-starter-on-starter fight. Otherwise, it will be best to stick with Pokémon like Delphox since it learns Shadow Ball through TMs, or Haunter/Gengar due to type advantage maybe giving you a nice shot at whittling its HP.




The End...?



I won't spoil the ending, but I will detail one final boss battle.

FINAL BOSS: Pokémon Trainer AZ

  • Rewards: N/A

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Torkoal Fire Level 60 N/A
Golurk Ground/Ghost Level 60 N/A
Sigilyph Psychic/Flying Level 60 N/A

  • Torkoal: This steamy guy is weak to Water, Rock, and Ground, and has advantages to Grass, Ice, Bug, and Steel. The essence of Fire types, it'll probably best to stick with Lapras or a Water starter on this guy.

  • Golurk: This guy is weak to Water, Ice, Grass, Ghost, and Dark, and is immune to Normal, Fighting, and Electric. It will be advantageous to Ghost, Psychic, Electric, Rock, Fire, Steel, and Poison. In general, a non-Fire starter will work fine, as would Lapras through an Ice Beam/Blizzard, or Haunter/Gengar through Shadow Ball.

  • Sigilyph: Finally, we find the last Pokémon of the pre-credits storyline... It is weak to Ghost, Dark, Ice, Rock, and Electric, and immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Fighting, Poison, Grass, and Bug. For it, you will do fine using Haunter/Gengar again, or Pikachu/Raichu or another Electric-type, or Lapras again with Ice Beam/Blizzard.



The Rest!



Sectional Flowchart









Homecoming: Vaniville Town & Lumiose City


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] National Pokédex [_] TMV Pass

POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability Notes
Both [any] Chespin Grass Overgrow You only get one! Chespin is if your Kalos starter was Fennekin; Fennekin for Froakie; Froakie for Chespin
Both [any] Fennekin Fire Blaze
Both [any] Froakie Water Torrent

After the events with the Elite Four, you'll return to Vaniville Town. Downstairs, your mom tells you to head to Lumiose Station (North Boulevard). As you go outside to try and Fly (or whatever you'll do), Shauna speaks with you. She wants to trade: any Pokémon for the unevolved version of her starter. Awesomesauce! That's about it, though.

Fly to Lumiose City and go to the Lumiose Station - go clockwise from the North Boulevard Pokémon Center to find it on the outer ring; some Skiddo should be asleep out front. Within, your Pokédex will become the National Pokédex, able to document all 721 Pokémon available in the world (until Game Freak slaps more together). Go speak with Sycamore to the northeast to earn the TMV Pass, letting you visit Kiloude City. Hey, let's do that - let's just board the train and go!




Kiloude City


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Max Revive [_] Vs. Recorder [_] TM91 (Flash Cannon) [_] Nugget [_] DNA Splicers [_] TM58 (Sky Drop)
[_] Max Revive [_] PP Up

KILOUDE CITY POKÉMART
Item Name Cost Effect
Antidote $100 Cures the Poison (PSN) status.
Awakening $250 Cures the Sleep (SLP) status.
Burn Heal $250 Cures the Burn (BRN) status.
Escape Rope $550 Instantly leave caves and some other dungeons; doesn't work everywhere.
Full Heal $600 Heals all negative non-status-based ailments (except KO and Pokérus).
Full Restore $3,000 Cures all statuses (but KO/Pokérus) and fully heals HP.
Great Ball $600 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x1.5.
Hyper Potion $1,200 Heals a Pokémon for 200 HP in the field or in battle.
Ice Heal $250 Cures the Frozen (FRZ) status.
Max Potion $2,500 Fully restores one Pokémon's HP in the field or battle, no matter how much.
Max Repel $700 Stops most random wild Pokémon encounters for 250 steps.
Paralyze Heal $200 Cures the Paralysis (PLZ) status.
Poké Ball $200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is the lowest at x1.0.
Potion $300 Heals a Pokémon for 20 HP in the field or in battle.
Premier Ball - It is like a regular Poké Ball, but free when you buy ten Poké Balls!
Repel $350 Prevents most random wild encounters for 100 steps.
Revive $1,500 Revives a Pokémon from KO with approximately 50% of their HP.
Super Potion $700 Heals a Pokémon for 50 HP in the field or in battle.
Super Repel $500 Prevents most random wild encounters for 200 steps. (Most cost-effective choice.)
Ultra Ball $1,200 Catches Pokémon. Its base catch rate is x2.0.

KILOUDE CITY POKÉMART - TMs
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Giga Impact (TM68) $90,000 Normal Physical 5 150 90 One No action on next turn
Light Screen (TM16) $30,000 Psychic Status 30 --- --- Allies Rasies Special Defense for five turns
Overheat (TM50) $80,000 Fire Special 5 130 90 One Lowers user's Special Attack harshly
Reflect (TM33) $30,000 Psychic Status 20 --- --- Allies Boosts Defense for five turns
Wild Charge (TM93) $50,000 Electric Physical 15 90 100 One Hurts user a little

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Ace Trainer Anton $6,600 Weezing Lv. 65, Eelektross Lv. 66, Bronzong Lv. 65

As you enter the final city of the Kalos region, go west in the station and speak with the person; answer their question with "Threads" (on Pokémon X) or "Perfume" (on Pokémon Y) to earn an ever-useful Max Revive. (Well, if you ever fight your rival or the Elite Four again.) Outside, a man will speak with you; inform him that you stopped Team Flare to earn the Vs. Recorder, used to record Wi-Fi battles and stuff.

Go east to the Pokémon Center and shop up on TMs - not like there's much else to shop up on, right, since you're healed and don't have much to fight now. The TMs there aren't exactly useful, beyond Light Screen and Reflect. Anyways, go on the west side of the Center. The man will investigate a Pokémon's IVs and vaguely inform you of their status. (IVs are set-in stats. For each IV, from 0 to 31, you have in a stat, you will gain that many points in that stat by Level 100. That can be critical - taking into account EVs, IVs, and Nature, a stat can vary by over 100 points!)

Outside, go east and into the next house. The girl on the upper floor will give you TM91. This teaches Flash Cannon, a nice Steel-type move you might want to use. Outside again, continue east, then north when first possible, then go up the first staircase you see. The item atop there will be a Nugget to sell. Return downstairs and west if you want to find the Battle Maison; that'll be detailed elsewhere.

For now, outside, continue west and into the house at the end of the road: he'll give you a quiz on Levitate (it's an ability some Pokémon have to prevent Ground-type damage). Anyways, he'll battle you after the third question. (Pro tip: All his Pokémon are weak to Levitate. Obviously.) After the battle, go outside, east, then north and upstairs. Go into the east house at the top and speak with the pink-haired girl: if you've brought over Kyurem from Pokémon Black/White 1/2 through PokéBank, or just traded, show it to her to get the DNA Splicers. These items from Black/White 2 allowed Kyurem to fuse with Reshiram or Zekrom to become one super-powerful (and cool-as-hell-looking) Pokémon, though the stats mostly were derived from Kyurem's plus some changed base stats.

After this, go into the other house and speak with the girl at the table to receive TM58 - it teaches Sky Drop, a decent Flying move that players of the original Black/White will remember for being glitchy to the point of banning in online play then. XD Outside, go north and upstairs, using the Dowsing Machine to hunt down a Max Revive to the northwest. Go back down the stairs and east to the final building of the city; a PP Up is near it, which you can find with the Dowsing Machine.

This building is the Friend Safari. I'll detail it in a different section, but it's good for catching Pokémon. Also in the center of the town is the Battle Maison - again, a different section, but it is basically a battle facility similar to the Battle Tower of previous games where you're meant to beat as many in a row as possible.




Upgrading the Mega Ring


ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Absolite

This particular event can occur pretty much any time after having unlocked Kiloude City and visited there. Once there, at the northern portion of town, you are allowed to battle your rival once daily.

BOSS: Pokémon Trainer Serena/Calem

  • Rewards: $7,000

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Meowstic Psychic Level 66 N/A
Altaria Dragon/Flying Level 67 N/A
Clefable Fairy Level 68 N/A
Absol Dark Level 68 N/A - but it can Mega Evolve!
Jolteon Electric Level 66 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Delphox Fire/Psychic Level 70 Your Kalos starter is Chespin
Flareon Fire Level 66 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Greninja Water/Dark Level 70 Your Kalos starter is Fennekin
Vaporeon Water Level 66 Your Kalos starter is Froakie
Chesnaught Grass/Fighting Level 70 Your Kalos starter is Froakie

  • Meowstic: There isn't much to say about this Pokémon. Meowstic is weak to Ghost, Dark, and Bug, and can use Psychic for extra damage on Fighting and Poison.

  • Altaria: This Pokémon is probably the best in her team. It has a double-weakness to Ice, and a normal one to Fairy and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground.

  • Clefable: This newly-Fairy-type Pokémon from Generation I is weak to Poison and Steel, with the obvious immunity to Dragon. Of note is Moonblast, a pretty power Fairy-type move (advantageous over Dragon, Dark, and Fighting).

  • Absol: This cool-looking dude is little harder than Meowstic. Bite is the main danger, able to ably hurt Psychics and Ghosts. Absol is weak to Fighting, Fairy, and Bug. This one is capable of Mega-Evolution, and probably will Mega-Evolve during the battle. This should have no reflection on your battle strategy, though: it doesn't affect type.

  • Jolteon: This guy is weak to Ground, and probably can use Volt Absorb to nullify Electric attacks. Its primary advantages are against Flying and Water.

  • Flareon: This Eevee-lution is weak to Ground, Rock, and Water, and could use Flash Fire to null Fire attacks. It's advantageous over Steel, Bug, Ice, and Grass.

  • Vaporeon: The final Eevee-lution of your rival's is weak to Grass and Electric, and probably nulls Water through Water Absorb. Its advantages are over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Delphox: Delphox is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark. Its moves give it an advantage over Steel, Ice, Grass, Bug, Poison, and Fighting. Do note that Psychic cannot hit Dark.

  • Greninja: As for Greninja, this is probably a little problematic for those of you who chose Fennekin. (Poor me!) It is weak to Grass, Electric, Fighting, Bug, and Fairy, and is immune to Psychic. It will have type-based advantages over Ground, Fire, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic.

  • Chesnaught: Finally, Chesnaught would be the easiest of the starters. It is doubly-weak to Flying, as weak as being weak to Fire, Ice, Poison, Psychic, and Fairy. Its moves give it advantages over Ground, Rock, Water, Normal, Ice, Steel, and Dark. Note, however, Fighting cannot hit Ghost, and most Ghosts are paired with the Steel, Fire, or Poison types, so that's really helpful.

The usual crap applies to her regulars: spam Flying on Chesnaught, then general weaknesses for the starters. These should be able to be facilitated by your Kanto starter, so there's little to mention there. Good alternates for Delphox would be Haunter, Gengar, and Lapras; for Greninja, Pikachu, Raichu, Jolteon, and Xerneas; for Chesnaught, Xerneas, Flareon, Haunter, and Gengar, just to name off a few for each. (Seriously, it's hard to not have something they're weak to.)

For Meowstic, Pokémon Y players will enjoy spamming Yveltal, while X may have to settle for Haunter, Gengar, Absol, or just a general starter: you'll usually one-hit this one. (Plus, Delphox can learn Shadow Ball, so that's a plus, eh?) The same can be said for her Absol: Pokémon X players can spam Xerneas, while Y will have to go for Machoke, Machamp, Scyther, Scizor, or just another general starter or someone that can learn Brick Break or Power-Up Punch.

Clefable, the only new Pokémon in your rival's team, can be a bit easy or difficult to take on. Pokémon Y players definitely will want to avoid Yveltal. For the most part, you'll probably want to avoid your starters as well, unless you're confident in a one-hit kill. (For example, Venusaur with Sludge Bomb is three times more powerful than normal.)

And, finally, the Eevee-lutions. You'll usually need something outside of your normal team to deal with them. Pokémon that can learn Dig can usually get rid of Flareon and Volteon easily enough, and Vaporeon can be taken out by something basic like Pikachu, Jolteon, and the like: there's nothing really hard to deal with about the Eevee-lutions.

So, we finally come down to Altaria... For this one, you should probably still the Lapras you hopefully have been using Surf on, just another outright Ice Pokémon you found while going around northeastern Kalos. (Brrr...) Pretty much all of those are capable of learning the Ice Beam you got from the Snowbelle Gym, so it's all good.

Again, we will find ourselves in another easy rival battle. The ideal level is around Level 60~65 by this point, though I'm topping Level 95 on my Delphox. Geez... Completionism gets rid of all the fun. =P


After the battle, you'll receive some Absolite. Absolite allows, obviously, Absol to Mega Evolve, similarly to how your rival's probably did in the battle - they can be found on Route 8 - Cliffside if you want them. She'll also mention that Professor Sycamore wants to meet you in Anistar City. Head there, preferably through Fly, then go northwest to the sundial. Next to it will be Professor Sycamore. He'll elaborate on the nature of the ultimate weapon, Xerneas/Yveltal, and Mega Stones. He'll also mention how some more Mega Stones are hidden throughout the Kalos region: but only really able to be found between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM - that's 20:00 and 21:00 per your 3DS clock.

Good huntin'! See the Mega Stones section for more!!




A Trade in Lumiose City


POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both [any] Ralts Psychic/Fairy Synchronize

This will definitely be a brief section, but one very much worth mentioning. After having beaten the Elite Four, head along into Lumiose City. On South Boulevard, there is a café, Café Soleil - it is the same one in which you and your rival first met Diantha, before you knew her as the Pokémon League Champion. There, you can find Diantha again. Speak with her and you'll learn that she wants you to trade her any Pokémon for her Ralts. *gives up a Magikarp*

Seems like a kinda crap trade for so late in the gate, right? WRONG! Well, I mean, sure, it's a Level 5 Ralts, not like there's anything special about that (even though they are a little tedious to find). But, rather, it's what the Ralts is holding - a Gardevoirite! Gardevoirite allows Gardevoir to Mega Evolve, similarly to how you saw Diantha Mega Evolve her Gardevoir when challenging the Elite Four. Ralts will evolve into Gardevoir at Level 30, which shouldn't take too long to manage when grinding against the Elite Four while holding a Lucky Egg with the Exp. Share turned on.




Random Hotel Trades


POSSIBLE TRADES AND GIFT POKÉMON
Version Pokémon Given Pokémon Received Pokémon Type Likely Ability
Both [any] Eevee Normal Run Away
Both Gyarados Magikarp Water Swift Swim

I will note that I am not 100% sure on whether these events are post-Elite Four or not. I didn't find them until then, but the Pokémon in question are weak enough (both come at Level 5) to warrant ... well, questioning. Currently, I know of two trades.

For the first, you need to speak to one of the hotel maids for several days to be offered a trade. This one concerns giving her any Pokémon for an Eevee she found in the Trophy Gardens in Sinnoh - I'm not quite sure if that fact has any significance here. It does hold a Rare Candy, which makes this trade worth it. (I mean, you could've caught an Eevee waaay back on Route 10.)

The other trade is quite, quite worthless unless you have a Gyarados to spare. Similarly to the previous trade, you'll have to speak to a Hiker for several days before being offered a super-special Magikarp for your Gyarados. I'm not entirely sure what's so special about it, unless I'm missing something. Still sounds like a waste of a Gyarados, although you can use the Super Rod on Route 3 to find 'em. =/




Surf Area - Route 3



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Dawn Stone

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Azurill Normal/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 1 HP Both
Bidoof Normal Simple, Unaware, Sudden Impulse 1 HP Both
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Burmy Bug Shed Skin, Overcoat 1 Sp.Def.Both
Dunsparce Normal Run Away, Serene Grace, Rattled 1 HP Both
Fletchling Normal/Flying Big Pecks, Gale Wings 1 Speed Both
Pidgey Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 1 Speed Both
Pikachu Electric Static, Lightningrod 2 Speed Both
ENCOUNTERS WHILE SURFING
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Marill Water/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 2 HP Both
Masquerain Bug/Flying Intimidate, Unnerve 1 Sp.Atk., 1 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Magikarp Water Swift Swim, Rattled 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Corphish Water Hyper Cutter, Shell Armor, Adaptability 1 Attack Both
Goldeen Water Swift Swim, Water Veil, Lightningrod 1 Attack Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Crawdaunt Water/Dark Hyper Cutter, Shell Armor, Adaptability 2 Attack Both
Gyarados Water/Flying Intimidate, Moxie 2 Attack Both
Seaking Water Swift Swim, Water Veil, Lightningrod 2 Attack Both

POKÉMON EVALUATIONS: Yes, Gyarados is important enough to warrant this: he is generally one of the strongest and most varied Pokémon in the game. Getting him is a great idea in general, despite the double-weakness to Electric moves. Ironically, there is a slight chance of finding Goldeen and Seaking here with Lightningrod - it's rare, but if you can get it, you will nullify any Electric attacks on the battlefield: the two would do great in Double/Triple Battles together. >:)

This area is hardly worth mentioning in detail, but to those who are curious... As you come in from Santalune Forest, go west and Surf across the water for a Dawn Stone.

If you didn't come back to use Cut before, go further north along the ground Route and you'll find a Cut tree. Beyond is a Revive.




Surf Area - Route 8 Oceanside



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Heart Scale [_] TM19 (Roost) [_] Charti Berry

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS WHILE SURFING
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Tentacool Water/Poison Clear Body, Liquid Ooze, Rain Disk 1 Sp.Def. Both
Wailmer Water Oblivious, Water Veil, Pressure 1 HP Both
ROCK SMASH ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Binacle Rock/Water Tough Charm, Sniper, Pickpocket 1 Attack Both
Dwebble Bug/Rock Shell Armor, Sturdy, Weak Armor 1 Defense Both
FISHING - OLD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Luvdisc Water Swift Swim, Hydration 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Clauncher Water Mega Launcher 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Staryu Water Illuminate, Natural Cure, Analytic 1 Speed Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Clawitzer Water Mega Launcher 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Qwilfish Water/Poison Poison Point, Swift Swim, Intimidate 1 Attack Both
Starmie Water/Psychic Illuminate, Natural Cure, Analytic 2 Speed Both

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Sky Trainer Colm $2,900 Mantyke Lv. 28, Jumpluff Lv. 29
Swimmer Estaban $448 Skrelp Lv. 28, Horsea Lv. 28
Swimmer Ramses $480 Tentacool Lv. 30

Let's come from Ambrette Town. Head north along the route to the Mago Berry tree. (Grab another if desired.) Head onto the water and Surf northwest. You should be able to encounter a Sky Trainer from the island: then again, I had to be northwest of the tree. If you head north-northwest of his island, you should see a sandy island where you can examine a rock for a Heart Scale. North of there, you can Surf and battle a Swimmer. On the nearby island, you can find TM19 - it teaches Roost. Roost is a move for many Flying Pokémon that makes them land and lose their Flying-type designation briefly while recovering HP. It may seem stupid, but think of what you need to do in a pinch against, say, Raichu or somethin'.

Another Swimmer is going around the rock formation to the southeast, so battle him, too. A while to the north, within the borders of Cyllage, you'll find a house on an island. O_o It gets electricity, too - there's a TV. O_O; Anyways, the kid within will hand over a Charti Berry, which weakens super-effective Rock-type moves. That's about it for here.




Waterfall Area - Routes 15 & 16



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM97 (Dark Pulse)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Phantump Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Harvest 1 Attack Both
Pumpkaboo Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Insomnia 1 Defense Both
Skorupi Poison/Bug Battle Armor, Sniper, Keen Eye 1 Defense Both
Weepinbell Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Gluttony 2 Attack Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Klefki Steel/Fairy Prankster, Magician 1 Defense Both
Murkrow Dark/Flying Insomnia, Super Luck, Prankster 1 Speed Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

Coming from Lumiose City, you'll see the Fishing Shack as usual, right? Go up the stairs to its east, then northeast from their apex onto the water. Surf along the river to the waterfall; power up it, then go along the river to the end. Open up the yellow Pokéball at the end to find TM97 - it teaches Dark Pulse, a decent Dark-type move.

That's actually it for here.




Waterfall Area - Couriway Town



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM80 (Rock Slide)

In  Couriway Town, head to the southern portion of town where the hotel and the Photo Spot are. Ascend the stairs and to the south is a river you can reach. Surf on it, then ascend the Waterfall to the east. At the top, you'll find TM80 - it teaches Rock Slide, a pretty decent Rock-type move (75 Power, 90 accuracy) that may cause flinching. And, yes, that's it for here - another one-item area.



Waterfall Area - Route 22 & The Chamber of Emptiness



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Elixir [_] Spooky Plate [_] Full Restore [_] Tanga Berry [_] Max Elixir [_] TM26 (Earthquake)
[_] Draco Plate

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS IN THE GRASS AND FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Azurill Normal/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 1 HP Both
Bidoof Normal Simple, Unaware, Sudden Impulse 1 HP Both
Bunnelby Normal Pickup, Cheek Pouch 1 Speed Both
Farfetch'd Normal/Flying Inner Focus, Keen Eye, Defiant 1 Attack Both
Litleo Normal/Fire Rivalry, Unnerve 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Psyduck Water Cloud Nine, Damp, Swift Swim 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Riolu Fighting Inner Focus, Steadfast, Mischieveous Heart 1 AttackBoth
ENCOUNTERS WHEN SURFING
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Psyduck Water Cloud Nine, Damp, Swift Swim 1 Sp.Atk. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Ace Trainer Adelbert $3,100 Lucario Lv. 31
Ace Trainer Hilde $3,000 Sharpedo Lv. 29, Gardevoir Lv. 30

Now, there's pretty much only one place we haven't visited if you've followed this guide insofar - y'know, unless you count that one extra room in the Terminus Cave that will be covered soon enough. It is the Chamber of Emptiness, found off Route 22 - if you're anything like me, you probably forgot it was there all this time. =P Anyways, fly to Santalune City and exit the city off to the northeast.

Once on Route 22, you won't find much to do initially if you've already done everything from the previous visit way-back-when in the linked-to section. If you didn't come visit when you got Cut, go north of the Route entrance to Cut down a tree to find an Elixir. Otherwise, go east to the Victory Road gatehouse; instead of entering, though, go south. Get on the water with Surf, then continue along to and down the Waterfall. At the bottom, go east and onto the land there. Head east and battle the Trainer, then go into the cavern. Inside the cavern, there is naught but a Spooky Plate, something to raise the power of Ghost moves and to turn Arceus into a Ghost-type.

Back outside, head southwest and across the stepping stones. On the other side, turn on the Dowsing Machine as you go south to find a Full Restore in a rock. Go south and beat the Trainer, then head southeast to the narrow path. Go further east for a while to find a Tanga Berry tree - they can weaken super-effective Bug-type attacks. Now, for a Strength boulder puzzle...

Move the one just to the north south as far as possible, west twice, north once, west twice, north once, and west once into the hole. If you face west from the southwest corner of the boulder once upon it, you can press A to find a hidden Max Elixir. Next, go northwest. Your immediate instinct is wrong here - push the south boulder westward as far as possible. Go the long way around to its south side and go north once. Head now to the west-facing face and push it east as far possible, then north into the hole. For the final boulder, push it east five times, then go the long way around to its south side and push it into the hole. There, you will find the useful TM26 - it teaches Earthquake!

Go onto the water to the northwest, then head east and up the Waterfall. Go along the path at the top and you can get a Draco Plate - obviously, it boosts the power of Dragon-type moves and makes Arceus a Dragon-type.

That'll do it for here.




Waterfall Area - Pokémon Village



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] TM29 (Psychic)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND IN THE FLOWER BEDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Amoonguss Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 2 HP Both
Gothorita Psychic Frisk, Shadow Tag 2 Sp.Def. Both
Ditto Normal Limber, Imposter 1 HP Both
Jigglypuff Normal/Fairy Cute Charm, Friend Guard, Competitive 2 HP Both
Noctowl Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 2 HP Both
Trevenant Ghost/Grass Natural Cure, Frisk, Harvest 2 Attack Both
Zoroark Dark Illusion 2 Sp.Atk. Both
POKÉMON FOUND IN TRASH BINS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Banette Ghost Frisk, Insomnia, Cursed Body 2 Attack Both
Garbodor Poison Stench, Sticky Hold, Aftermath 2 Speed Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Foongus Grass/Poison Effect Spore, Regenerator 1 HP Both
Noctowl Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 2 HP Both
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Barboach Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 1 HP Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
FISHING - SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
Whiscash Water/Ground Anticipation, Oblivious, Hydration 2 HP Both

When you return here from Route 20 - follow that walkthrough if you need a path through the forest maze - head to the far west side of the area. Surf onto the water and head north past the music-note-shaped flower patch to the Waterfall. Ascend and you'll find TM29 at the top - it teaches Psychic, a decent Psychic-type move your Psychic-type Pokémon, such as the Psychic-type Mewtwo you can find in the cave below here at the base of the waterfall if you've beaten the Elite Four. See Legend Hunting: Mewtwo for details.



Waterfall Area - Frost Cavern



ITEMS/TREASURES CHECKLIST
[_] Heart Scale [_] TM71 (Stone Edge)

LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA
ENCOUNTERS FOUND AT RANDOM INSIDE THE CAVERN
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Beartic Ice Snow Cloak, Swift Swim 2 Attack Both
Bergmite Ice Own Tempo, Ice Body, Sturdy 1 Defense Both
Cryogonal Ice Levitate 2 Sp.Def. Both
Haunter Ghost/Poison Levitate 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Jynx Ice/Psychic Forewarn, Oblivious, Dry Skin 2 Sp.Atk. Both
Piloswine Ice/Ground Oblivious, Snow Cloak, Thick Fat 1 Attack, 1 HP Both
HORDE BATTLES
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Cubchoo Ice Snow Cloak, Rattled 1 Attack Both
Smoochum Ice/Psychic Forewarn, Oblivious, Hydration 1 Sp.Atk. Both
Vanillite Ice Ice Body, Weak Armor 1 Sp.Atk. Both
SURFING ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Floatzel Water Swift Swim, Water Veil 2 Speed Both
Lombre Water/Grass Rain Dish, Swift Swim, Own Tempo 2 Sp.Def. Both
FISHING - OLD ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Poliwag Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 1 Speed Both
FISHING - GOOD ROD & SUPER ROD ENCOUNTERS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Basculin* Water Adaptability, Reckless (Red), Rock Head (Blue) 2 Speed Both
Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 2 Speed Both
NOTE (*): While typically version-exclusive as far as the Blue- and Red-Striped Formes go, they're not here (at least I've noticed nothing refuting this). They have no difference except in Ability and possible hold item (Deep Sea Tooth on Red, Deep Sea Scale on Blue).

The area in question is found as you enter the Frost Cavern area coming from Dendemille Town. As you reach the snowy area, go northwest past the Hiker and Surf onto the water, then use Waterfall to descend. Once you hit the lower area, go northeast and land to find a Heart Scale. Go back south and head east along the river. At the end, where some rocks block you, head south and onto land. Grab the TM from the Pokéball - it is TM71, which teaches the useful Stone Edge move.




Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 1: That Man's a Real Looker


^sr32|

Now, then... Walk into Lumiose City to begin this particular quest. I didn't get it to occur when Flying here, but that was when I had yet to open up Kiloude City. Then again, Kiloude doesn't really have much relevance to the plot. Regardless, as you begin stepping into Kiloude, you'll get a call from someone on the Holo Caster who fails to identify himself: all you know is to go to the Looker Bureau in Rouge Plaza. You can take a cab there. Otherwise, it is in the alley directly opposite the Route 14 gate on North Boulevard. (It originally was a property for rent.)

Within, you'll meet Looker: you'll be well familiar with this guy if you played Pokémon Platinum. Opt to partner with him and we can continue the storyline. Speak with him after the initial conversation to be given a task: you need to find the five Looker Tickets distributed throughout the expanse of Lumiose City. As you leave the bureau, you'll be given the locations of the tickets rather directly. ... How's that supposed to test us?


  • Centrico Plaza: In Prism Tower (the Gym). We'll cover this one first since it's the easiest: if you look around the Lumiose skyline, you should be able to see the tower. Enter and you'll see a sparkle in the southwest corner: it's a ticket!

  • Magenta Plaza: This one is within the Pokémon Center. Magenta Plaza is the northwest plaza of the city, but it's kinda hard to find from the Prism Tower as there are no specific landmarks there and the camera rotates annoyingly (okay, not quite annoying). So, guess and check, I suppose? It's the same plaza where you can find the Lysandre Café at least. The sparkle within denoting the ticket is hard to see due to a lack of contrast, but it's in the northwestern part of the area - if you approach the changing room, you'll see it.

  • Vernal Avenue: This one is in the Herboriste shop on Vernal Avenue. Vernal Avenue is the southernmost one of the city; if you go clockwise from the Route 4 entrance, or just outright use a cab, or leave the Pokémon Gym's inner area heading south then continue south, you'll reach it. The shop in question is the second on the left when heading northward, the sparkle being easily spotted in the east-central area next to the table.

  • North Boulevard: This one is in the art museum on North Boulevard. If you look clockwise from the Pokémon Center here, you'll see a large white building across the street: that's the museum. Upon entrance, go due east and, next to the woman on the couch, will be the sparkle denoting another ticket.

  • North Boulevard: This one is in the hotel on North Boulevard, specifically Hotel Richissime. If you went to the art museum first, continue clockwise down the street: it'll be the next enterable building, a black one with a sign out front. To find the ticket, go to the far east into the corner, then go north: you'll see the sparkling thingy.

After doing this, return to the Looker Bureau - again, accessible by cab or in the alley opposite Route 14. Accept his request and we'll be finally allowed to open up more and more.



Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 2: In the Back Alleys


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Preschooler Natalie $848 Swinub Lv. 53, Bonsly Lv. 53
Preschooler Lily $880 Igglybuff Lv. 55
Schoolgirl Callie $1,696 Rapidash Lv. 53, Kingler Lv. 53, Leavanny Lv. 53
Schoolboy Macon $1,792 Spiritomb Lv. 56

Head down to South/North Boulevards and you should get another request from Looker for another case to solve: head into the bureau. He'll tell you to read the notebook on his desk for notes concerning the case: basically, the kids of the city like to play in the alleys, and the parents are worried and suspicious. Talking to Looker gets us a feeling about some of those in South Boulevard. Okay, then. Head along to South Boulevard, specifically the Route 4 gateway. Head clockwise along the northern side of the street and you'll find a sleeping Skiddo eventually: enter this alleyway.

Within, you can progress northward as long as you do battles on the way. Careful, they're weally, weally strong! (Well, stronger than the average preschoolers - what parents allow their kids to have such powerful Pokémon, easily capable of lasting through the sixth Gym at least?) Past them, you'll find ... Looker!? From behind him comes an Espurr, one rather angry at having its territory intruded upon. After the rather thought-provoking cutscene, the Espurr runs off and you need to go find 'im.

According to Looker (as you exit the alley), Mimi probably ran off to where Espurr are commonly found, somewhere on North Boulevard. The one with Mimi in it is a while down from the Pokémon Center there, heading counterclockwise. From another viewpoint, it's across the street and somewhat clockwise from the Route 13 gatehouse. At the end of the alley - be sure to go to the end - head west to find Mimi. Note that Mimi can show up in the other alleys if, when you speak to it, you do the wrong thing: other alleys are across from Lumiose Station and another a while away clockwise from the Route 13 gatehouse.

For the record, the proper thing to do is sing to it. After, it goes to another: it goes from the Route 13 one, to that one further down, to Lumiose, then Route 13 again, and so on. You need to sing to it thrice for it work out well enough; you'll automatically go to Looker and Emma, and the chapter coems to a close.




Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 3: Detective, Tourist, Gang


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Lumiose Gang Member Sedna $4,640 Mandibuzz Lv. 58
Lumiose Gang Member Eris $4,480 Pangoro Lv. 56, Bouffalant Lv. 56
Lumiose Gang Member Nix $4,480 Druddigon Lv. 56, Krookodile Lv. 56

Yet again, soon after the Chapter 2 case, you'll get another by moving out onto North or South Boulevards: Looker has another case for ya. He's concerned now more about Emma: ever since we decided to house her here, she's been appearing stressed out. Soon thereafter, a woman speaking ... holy ****, Japanese! ... *ahem* a foreign language enters the bureau. Obviously, our in-game selves cannot understand it, and you probably don't either. (It turns out it's basically just what you're told moments later - it's comprehensible, just not really special.) After Looker clearly misunderstands the speech, Emma arrives, apparently able to speak both Japanese and English.

>_< I've got a headache.

Apparently, Mimi is able to provide a sort of telepathic translation. Well. After, we find out the real reason she came: to find out who stole her Pokémon. Emma posits that the thief was part of the Lumiose Gang; Looker goes off to Lumiose Station to find them, without a Pokémon to help. *rolls eyes* Well, go off and help him - within the station, go to the east end of the southern platform. Hurry up and defeat those punks before their poor grammar gives us a brain hemorrhage.

That ... was an interesting cutscene.




Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 4: An Unforgiveable Crime


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Suspicious Woman ??? $8,400 Jellicent Lv. 58, Volcarona Lv. 60
Suspicious Child ??? $1,824 Whimsicott Lv. 57, Granbull Lv. 57, Mawile Lv. 57
Suspicious Lady ??? $860 Persian Lv. 60

Hey. Guess what? Go out onto North/South Boulevards for another Holo Clip from Looker, saying that he has another job for you. Whelp, back to the bureau.

He's worried about how Emma's been running off lately: Looker believes the Lumiose Gang to basically be on the straight-'n'-narrow, but there's always trouble brewing in a metropolis like this. You'll soon get a bulletin, interuptting the conversation, notifying you that there's been vandalism in the Lumiose Art Museum, the destruction of a painting most importantly. Head onto North Boulevard, then just a bit clockwise and across the street to the museum.

The defaced painting in question is in the center of the third floor. Speak with the director there and then leave. Just outside, you'll get another bulletin: Pokéball thefts have been occurring across the city, particularly after Pokémon battles in back alleys. Looker calls soon thereafter, requesting you return to him. He comes up with a sting operation to get the culprits, set in the back alleys of the North Boulevard.

There are three alleys back there: one around Route 13's gatehouse, one around the Galette Stand, and one near the Station. Begin with the one somewhat clockwise of the alley with the bureau in it (the Galette Stand one), then battle the woman at the end. After the battle, the woman attempts to take your Pokémon, then transforms into a robotic suit, fleeing from Looker. ... What?

Repeat this process near the Route 13 gatehouse, further counterclockwise from there. After the similar scene there, go far along the other way to the alley across from Lumiose Station. There, we find that someone else has just been victimized. It is likely the culprit went to South Boulevard, and there's only one alley there: continue clockwise from Lumiose Station into the next area, then go into the alley where you first found Emma. Defeat the person at the end of the alley.

Again, they transform. And then... Uh... Oh crap.




Looker's Detective Agency - Chapter 5: A Fiery Woman and the Truth Revealed


LOCAL TRAINERS' POKÉMON
Trainer Name Money Earned Pokémon Party
Butler Chalmers $4,960 Braviary Lv. 62
Pokémon Trainer Malva $12,600 Pyroar Lv. 63
Scientist Sonia $4,820 Elgyem Lv. 60, Klinklang Lv. 60
Scientist Ernst $4,748 Weezing Lv. 61, Heliolisk Lv. 61
Lumiose Gang Member Sedna $4,960 Mandibuzz Lv. 62
Lumiose Gang Member Eris $4,800 Pangoro Lv. 60, Bouffalant Lv. 60
Scientist Justus $4,464 Muk Lv. 62
Lumiose Gang Member Nix $4,880 Druddigon Lv. 59, Krookodile Lv. 61
Pokémon Trainer Essentia $9,240 Jellicent Lv. 64, Volcarona Lv. 66
$8,820 Whimsicott Lv. 63, Mawile Lv. 63, Granbull Lv. 63
$9,240 Persian Lv. 66
$9,800 Crobat Lv. 68, Malamar Lv. 70

After that startling cutscene, head again onto a Boulevard to get a Holo Clip from Loo-- I mean, Emma. She wants you to come to the bureau. There, she finds out (when you tell her) that Looker is in the hospital before suddenly running off. Meanwhile, a different person enters, fire requesting a battle before actually getting to the business. You have been requested to go to Hotel Richissime's Royal Suite - Hotel Richissime is down the street in North Boulevard going clockwise, in a black building. The Royal Suite is at 5F; there, go south, west, and north into the room.

There, you'll find a member of the Elite Four, Malva, the Fire-type specialist. She will challenge you to a brief battle, but it's far from the difficulty her four normally would provide. After the battle, she begins talking about that "Essentia" you met and how it really is just Emma in an Expansion Suit. It's an article by Dr. Xerosic, once associated with Team Flare before you dowsed it thoroughly. She tells you he is in the Lysandre Café labs, but be ready to possibly die. O_o This game is rated "E"?

Anyways, Lysandre Café, as usual, can be reached through a taxicab. It's in an off-shoot alley from Magenta Plaza, the northwestern plaza of the city where a Pokémon Center lies. You'll meet Malva within. Follow her downstairs and you'll be given access to some secret floor: go along to it. As you enter, you'll be challenged to a Pokémon battle.

So, now then, another arrow tile puzzle. It's actually the same as the one from before. >_> The solution is altered at least, given what we're here to do. Use the nearby westbound tile, then go through the teleporter. On the other side, go into the teleporter, then go along the arrow tile. Once stopped, go northeast and beat the Scientist. Use the nearby eastbound arrow, then the southbound one. After stopping, go northeast without using the tiles until you can use the eastbound one. Use another eastbound one after and defeat the nearby gang member.

Use the western of the three southbound arrow tiles. When stopped, go west between but not on the tiles, then further along to a familiar mug. After the battle, go southwest and into the teleporter, then go north on the other side to another Scientist. Use the telporter afterwards, then go north and beat another familiar face. Once the battle's over with, go into the room beyond. Within are a number of treasures ... wait, those are other Trainers' Pokéballs!

Examine each of the bookshelves - every single step you can take along their south-facing shelves - and read all five volumes of the Expansion Suit. After, speak with Nix, whose shift then ends. Try leaving and someone barges in past you. This is Xerosic, and he summons Essentia to battle you in a four-battle series. The first three battles (six Pokémon total in a 2-3-1 distribution) are against the Pokémon you encountered in the back alleys, with a slightly high set of levels. The fourth is against two new Pokémon, insofar the strongest you've seen from in-game Trainers. Luckily, you do get to prepare between battles; speak with Looker before the fourth for a full healing. Plus, the Amulet Coin or Pure Incense might not be too bad an idea - you could earn $72,400 from these four battles!

Continue watching...




Looker's Detective Agency - Final Chapter: Here's Lookin' At You, Kid



After the scenes, head down to the North/South Boulevards again. As usual, you'll get a call through the Holo Caster; Emma wants you down at the bureau. There, Mimi arrives with a letter from Looker. After reading it, Emma runs off, trying to find him. Head to the Lumiose Art Museum first. There, you can go to the third floor and speak with the art director concerning where "the police officer" was heading. (You can also buy an audio guide to finally get a description of that new painting.) Once done, go back outside to learn more precisely where he's at - Lysandre Café. Go there...

So concludes pretty much anything I've noticed pertaining to the game's plotline. Congrats! You can battle Emma (as Essentia) in the Looker Bureau office on occasion now with her Crobat and Malamar as outlined previously - should be easy.




Legend Hunting: Zygarde


^sr31|

Zygarde is the final Pokémon of Kalos's legendary trio alongside Xerneas and Yveltal; although it doesn't have much mention, if any, in the plot, it could probably be elaborated on if Pokémon Z were to be made. (Hey, there's numerous support reasingons why this would make sense.)

We need to go to Terminus Cave: Fly to Couriway, then go north to Route 18. Use the upper entrance of Terminus Cave, next to the Inverse Battle house. Use the Terminus Cave walkthrough to go along to where the Reaper Cloth was found. The next area will soon lead to an area with six paths: along them you'll find Adamant Orb (southwest), Griseous Orb (northwest), Lustrous Orb (southeast), and a Big Nugget hidden at the end to the northeast. The first three are Generation IV items used to power-up Dialga, Giratina (and change this one's Forme!), and Palkia, though they can probably be used on any Pokémon to power up their Dragon- and Steel-/Ghost-/Water-type moves.

Anyways, to the far north is Zygarde!


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #718 Zygarde--=
  • EV Yield: 3 HP
  • Hold Item: None

Level Level 70 Move 1 Crunch (Dark)
Type Dragon/Ground Move 2 Earthquake (Ground)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Camouflage (type change)
Abilities Aura Break Move 4 Dragon Pulse (Dragon)

  • Zygarde: This Pokémon is weak to Ice (4x), plus Dragon and Fairy (x2). It is immune to Electric, as well. It resists Fire, Poison, and Rock. Its moves can be supereffective against Psychic, Ghost, Fire, Rock, Steel, Poison, Electric, and Dragon.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)




Legend Hunting: Mewtwo


^sr29|

Our next Pokémon will be Mewtwo. Mewtwo is a pretty famous Pokémon, especially to veterans of the series and anime, due to his numerous appearances in the movies. Normally only having been found in the Unknown Dungeon northwest of Cerulean in Red/Green and their respective remakes after having been the only live-birth Pokémon (from Mew), he returns in Kalos in the Unknown Dungeon near the Pokémon Village.

Fly to Snowbelle City, then leave off to the south and through Route 20 as usual to the Pokémon Village. (See the linked-to walkthrough if you need help.) There, go to the far west side of the area via the southwestern ramp and get on the water. Surf northward and land on the terrain just at the base of the waterfall. Go east and into the now-unguarded cavern. Mewtwo is within.


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #150 Mewtwo--=
  • EV Yield: 3 Special Attack
  • Hold Item: None, but Mewtonite X (Pokémon X) or Mewtwonite Y (Pokémon Y) can be found after

Level Level 70 Move 1 Recover (HP heal)
Type Psychic Move 2 Psychic (Psychic)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Barrier (raises Defenses)
Abilities Pressure, Unnerve Move 4 Aura Sphere (Psychic)

  • Mewtwo: As usual, Mewtwo is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug. It will resist Fighting and Psychic, and all else other than the named does normal damage. It has offensive advantages against Fighting and Poison, but those same Psychic moves don't affect Dark.

Obviously, you'll want to catch this guy - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)




Legend Hunting: Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos


^sr30|

There are other Generation I/III-remake legends available in Pokémon X/Y - the legendary birds Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos. Similarly to the legendary beasts in Pokémon Gold/Silver and their remakes, which you can get depends on your Kalos-region starter: Fennekin yields Zapdos, Chespin yields Articuno, and Froakie yields Moltres. They all rely on the same mechanics in this game.

The legendary will be randomly found at first: you won't really get to track it until you see it, after which it will be visible and traceable in the National Pokédex. It will go to random places and can be found by Surfing or walking through the grass and flowers. Each time you find it, unlike normal Roaming Pokémon, it will immediately fly away without a chance for you to respond in any fashion. After about 10 ~ 15 times seeing it, it will end up in the Sea Spirit's Den - it in the Azure Bay, which I detailed in the linked-to section.


=--SPECIAL ENCOUNTER: #144 Articuno, #145 Zapdos, or #146 Moltres--=
  • Hold Item: None
  • EV Yield:
    • Articuno: 3 Special Defense
    • Zapdos: 3 Special Attack
    • Moltres: 3 Special Attack

#144 - ARTICUNO (Kalos starter is Chespin)
Level Level 70 Move 1 ?
Type Ice/Flying Move 2 ?
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 ?
Abilities Pressure Move 4 ?
#145 - ZAPDOS (Kalos starter is Fennekin)
Level Level 70 Move 1 Light Screen (ups Special Defense)
Type Electric/Flying Move 2 Rain Dance (boosts Water, weakens Fire, Thunder is no-miss)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Discharge (Electric; hits all)
Abilities Pressure Move 4 Agility (ups Speed)
#144 - MOLTRES (Kalos starter is Froakie)
Level Level 70 Move 1 Safeguard (prevents ailments for 5 turns)
Type Fire/Flying Move 2 Air Slash (Flying)
Gender Ratio Genderless Move 3 Heat Wave (Fire)
Abilities Pressure Move 4 Sunny Day (makes it Sunny)

  • Articuno: Articuno is doubly-weak to Rock, normally weak to Fire, Electric, and Steel, and immune to Ground. It will resist Grass and Bug. It has type-based advantages over Ground, Flying, Grass, Fighting, and Bug.

  • Zapdos: Zapdos is weak to Rock and Ice, and is immune to Ground. It resists Grass, Fighting, Flying, Bug, and Steel. It has type-based advantages over Flying, Water, Grass, and Fighting.

  • Moltres: Moltres is doubly-weak to Rock, normally weak to Electric and Water, and immune to Ground. It resists Grass (1/4), Bug (1/4), Fighting (1/2), Bug (1/2), and Steel (1/2). It has type-based advantages over Grass, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Fighting.

Am I the only one thinking of the battle music from Pokémon Red/Blue when it comes to this battle? =P

Obviously, you'll want to catch whichever guy you get - short of trading, you'll be lucky to find this Pokémon again. The sure-shot method would be to use the Master Ball. However, the Master Ball is a one-time item (I think - it's rarely two in the series) that you'll want to save for more annoying Pokémon that just have to run away from you. Or at least more powerful Pokémon. I recommend either Zygarde or Mewtwo for the Master Ball.

The other way? Teach a Pokémon to use Thunder Wave or Stun Spore and False Swipe. Either of the first two moves can be used for Paralysis, which boosts catch rates. False Swipe is a 40-Power Normal move that won't kill. (If you can't use it, try moves that deal less damage than normal: it's riskier, though!) You can try using False Swipe for two turns after Paralysis is induced to try and see how well the quadruple-rate Quick Ball will do on this fourth turn. If it fails, then just lower the Pokémon's HP to 1 and then begin shooting Ultra Balls at it. Keep track of turns, though - after 20 turns pass, the Timer Balls will begin to be more effective. They have a x3.0 catch rate at that point (Ultra only is x2.0), but if you're low in number, you may want to wait some more until they're up to x4.0 later. Dusk Balls also work, since you're in a cavern.

(For the record, status-wise, Sleep and Frozen are 33% more effective to the catch rate than Paralysis. However, neither stat is permanent without curing, and no move causes Freezing without damaging the Pokémon.)





Sidequests

Pokémon-Amie



Sectional Flowchart






Pokémon-Amie: Basics and Rewards



^sr41|

Pokémon-Amie is probably the absolute cutest thing in Pokémon X/Y - maybe the entire series - to be devised. (And I am not intending that to be derogatory; I'm being rather serious.) It could even be one of the most beneficial aspects of Pokémon X/Y for your Pokémon, given what it could do to your battle strategy and whatever personal attachments you have to your Pokémon.

Pokémon-Amie is accessed similarly to the PSS and Super Training apps on the Touch Screen - simply press L/R to find it. There, you can tap on a Pokémon. If you opt to switch it out, you can see its various stats regarding Pokémon-Amie and the other Pokémon with which you may want to play. Once you want to play, do so!

Within the Pokémon-Amie interactive, you can do a number of things.


  • You can pet your Pokémon by rubbing them using the stylus and Touch Screen, which raises their affection. Keep in mind some Pokémon have areas they don't like to be rubbed on: for example, my Pikachu doesn't like being rubbed on his belly. It's generally individual to the Pokémon, I think. Some Pokémon have areas you outright shouldn't touch - people familiar with the anime can understand why you shouldn't touch Pikachu's cheeks, and general logic tells you not to rub the fiery tail of a Charmander. =P Other than that type of stuff, your Pokémon is pretty okay with anywhere else: just rub repeatedly and a number of hearts (or a music note) should appear. The implications of this are in the next section.

  • You can "make faces" with your Pokémon. Quite literally. This does require a pretty bright area (like, I needed to be in a well-windowed area in the daytime) and a clean inner 3DS/2DS camera. When a certain green face-like icon appears in the lower-left, you can play this little minigame. Basically, do what it tells you (wink this eye, tilt your head this way, open your mouth this much, etc.) and you can raise your Pokémon's affection! Keep also in mind that your face needs to be pretty recognizable - no hair in the face, probably no glasses, and so on, like you would do for general facial recognition stuff.

  • You can run your stylus along the Touch Screen in areas where nothing are - it's basically to mimic you waving your finger in random motions. It doesn't really raise affection, but the reaction's pretty cute for some Pokémon, especially if you high-five them. It doesn't work for all Pokémon, though.

  • Similarly, you can use the microphone to speak with your Pokémon. (The mic will take just about any random sound into account, though. Like I had set my 3DS down on my desk for a moment and rather loudly and accidentally banged my mouse against my cup and Pikachu recognized it.) It also doesn't really change anything.

  • You can feed your Pokémon PokéPuffs. PokéPuffs can be accessed via the top-left icon in the interactive. From there, you can grab a PokéPuff - if you don't like what you see, maybe you should scroll left (put the stylus in the middle of the selection area and swipe left). Each Pokémon has its own individual likes - it disregards species. There are several flavors of PokéPuffs - green are mint, orange are citrus, pink are sweet, light-brown are spicy, and dark-brown are mocha. There are also several degrees of effectiveness with each getting more powerful: basic, frosted, fancy, deluxe, and supreme. Respectively, they give the Pokémon one, two, three, four, and five hearts - see the following statistics section for the purpose of them. The better you do in minigames, generally the better the PokéPuff you get. Feeding Pokémon PokéPuffs boosts their Fullness and Affection.

  • You can also play minigames with them, discussed in later sections - basically, they raise Enjoyment and Affection, as well as lowering Fullness.

Phew!

Anyways, those are the basics of Pokémon-Amie. So, you may be asking why we should go through this? Well, as your Pokémon's affection rating goes up, a variety of things can happen - sometimes very beneficial things, as it were! Generally, if you see a heart or your Pokémon looks at you during battle, then, yeah, it was caused by Pokémon-Amie. Note that I have not seen the following effects occur in online competition, just the single-player experience.


  • Random in-battle dialogue changes to evoke emotional reactions from you. (i.e. "It looks like it's about to cry" may appear at low HP. ;_;)
  • You could pet the Pokémon after a battle if you rub the Touch Screen.
  • Your critical-hit ratio can be increased.
  • Your evasion rate can be increased.
  • The Pokémon may recover early from status ailments.
  • The EXP. earned can be boosted!
  • The Pokémon could survive attacks that would KO it!



Pokémon-Amie: Pokémon-Amie Statistics



There are three primary statistics in Pokémon-Amie.

  • Affection: By far the most important, this can help to determine the awards you get, detailed at the end of the previous section. It is raised by petting Pokémon, playing Make Faces with them, playing minigames, and feeding Pokémon PokéPuffs. It maxes at five hearts. This stat is completely independent of the Pokémon's actual Happiness stat!

  • Fullness: This determines how many PokéPuffs your Pokémon can eat: there's a general "1 PokéPuff, 1 unit" correspondence here. If the Pokémon begins to eat slower or even just ignore the food, then the Pokémon is getting fuller. In other words, it's a long and tedious process to raise Affection by just eating - the quickest way to a Pokémon's heart is not through it's stomach. =) Anyways, this is lowered by playing minigames.

  • Enjoyment: Simply put, it denotes how often you play minigames: the more music notes, the more you've played minigames with it recently. It also increases as battles are done in the field involving the Pokémon in question.

Specifically regarding Affection, it is denoted by how hearts a Pokémon has given off when you've done various activities with it.

Affection Hearts Given Off
0 Hearts 0
1 Heart 1 ~ 49
2 Hearts 50 ~ 99
3 Hearts 100 ~ 149
4 Hearts 150 ~ 249
5 Hearts 250+



Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Berry Picker



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, your Pokémon get more demanding faster and you'll have more Berries to contend with.

The goal is to tap and drag the Berries on the Touch Screen to the Pokémon requesting them: you've probably played a minigame like this if you've played Mario Party DS. The Berry the Pokémon wants is in the little thought bubble next to it - drag the Berry into the thought bubble and the Pokémon will go off, giving you a point. If you do it fast enough, you'll get additional points, denoted by an orange note in lieu of a yellow one. Most of the difficulties are timed except Unlimited - in that difficulty, you are to get as many Berries done as possible, as the difficulty slowly racks up, up to the point that you fail to give the Pokémon a Berry fast enough or the proper Berry three times.

As for some tips... When the Pokémon begin to come in groups, try to set up a bit of a method of going to them rather than hectically spotting Pokémon needing a Berry. I, for example, tend to go sequential, generally left to right. If you spot Pokémon popping up out of sync, go for whoever came up first. And generally try to familiar yourself with the position of the Berries as you go: if you can do that, then you just need to look at the Pokémon for who wants what.




Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Head It



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, you generally have to deal with multiple Pokémon more often, have more complex series of yarn balls to contend with, and the balls obviously will vary in speed more.

The concept of this minigame is to make the Pokémon bounce back balls of yarn using their heads. Tap the Pokémon and it'll bounce back the ball of yarn. Doing so normally earns you one point, but you can earn three if you bounce it back at the right time. Continually hitting the ball in sequence is good as well and gives a combo - starting around 10~15 hits, regardless of the "right time" bonus, you'll also get a "FEVER" double bonus: that means you could get up to six hits! Your combo breaks, though, if you miss the yarn or fail to hit it. As time goes on, more and more Pokémon come to play, and the yarn balls increase in quantity, speed, and variety of speeds. At the end, you can hit an extra large yarn ball for bonus points - however, you don't get that in Unlimited mode, since it is not timed and just ends upon missing three balls of yarn.

As for some tips? Well... A lot of the time, there's actually a rhythmic pattern to the balls dropping, despite it being on one or three Pokémon, so you can use that to your advantage. However, when doing so, listen for "out of place" sounds, like a low-pitched whistle, to indicate a yarn ball is going to fall at a different-than-normal speed. That's actually the main thing to note here.




Pokémon-Amie: Minigames: Tile Puzzle



This particular minigame is the leftmost of those given to you. Like all the others, there are several difficulties: Easy, Normal, Hard, and Unlimited. As the difficulty increases, each puzzle will have more pieces to contend with.

The Tile Puzzle minigames are debatedly the hardest of the three to go for. In these puzzles, you need to tap two tiles of the puzzle to switch them around: if they fit in their proper positions, then they'll stick there and lose their dashed cyan border. You need to get them all to fit as quickly as possible. Normally, this would seem simple if it weren't for the pictures actually being dynamic: they can move around and change quite suddenly to throw you off! In Unlimited mode, you will go through the puzzles sequentially with a time limit imposed: you gain more time for correctly moving pieces and for completing puzzles, with the game ending when time runs out.

And tips? Well, first start with the corner pieces - unlike the more recent tradition of puzzles from the Mario & Luigi RPG series, the pieces are not rotated, so they look as they should. You can look at the colored border around the tile to get an idea of where it fits. From there, go for the edge pieces - remember that the edges will have their colors blend about halfway between the corner pieces. And from there, you're mostly on your own with the central pieces.



Super Training



Sectional Flowchart






Super Training: The Basics


^sr39|

One of the newest additions to the Pokémon formula is that of Super Training. Super Training is accessible by pressing L or R and navigating through the Touch Screen. There, the lower-left icon, the soccer ball, allows you to progress into the training. Throughout training and at regular intervals, you'll also receive some punching bags, accessible in the lower-right corner, that help you to increase your stats.

The premise of Super Training is more in-depth than you might think. It is far some simply the increasing of your stats, but your EVs, which in turn boost your stats. Confused? See [[Super Training: EVs Explained & EV Increases]] for more. EVs were normally a completely hidden value in Pokémon - only accessible through hacking, once revealed, it allowed people to intensely and accurately train their Pokémon to precise statistic levels: EVs are one of the reasons, along with IVs and Nature, why two Pokémon of the same species, level, gender, and abilities rarely have the exact same stats.

When Super Training, your general goal is to shoot the white-colored goals you will see on the Pokémon Balloon, also on-screen. Doing so will earn you points (see the lower-right corner of the nearby screenshot). Most of these balloons will also fire HUGE soccer balls back at you. Getting hit, of course, makes you lose points: typically 50 - 400.

For the in-depth controls? Well, needless to say, you're pretty screwed if you're a leftie -- sorry. Use the Circle Pad to maneuver your Pokémon - you can move him/her/it within a limited range up, down, left, and right, and you can do diagonally. You can tap the Touch Screen to launch a ball with very little power. However, if you tap and hold the stylus on the Touch Screen, you build up power: additionally, a targeting cursor will appear on-screen to let you aim precisely! The more power you build, the more powerful your shots. If you need to block a soccer ball, use the L Button.

In-depth strategy? Eh, there isn't much beyond practice: each time I played, I beat the course's proposed "record" time on either my first, or rarely my second try. Just use your power shots a lot and try to predict the movement of the goals (or fire wildly). Some Pokémon Balloons also make barriers appear that tend to block shots: a yellow cursor goes along these, which you can hit with a power shot to destroy the barrier. Hitting a lot of the white goals (they disappear after one hit) will also let you spawn a red one, which you can hit multiple times for lots of points - I often get high above the Pokémon and just rapidly touch the Touch Screen.

Each Pokémon also has a different ball type. Some Pokémon shoot green balls, which aren't special. Some shoot blue ones that are extra powerful. Others shoot yellow ones that are extra fast and basically allow rapid-fire. Finally, some shoot the strong, yet slow, orange ones. Look at the icon in the top-right of the Touch Screen to learn which.




Super Training: EVs Explained


POKÉRUS

There is a particularly rare status - the odds of finding it being 3 in 65,536, which is about 1 in 20,000 or about 0.004578% - known as Pokérus, abbreviated as PKRS in previous games. Pokérus is a somewhat useful status in that, once caught, the Pokémon in question will always have its EV earnings doubled: where someone normally gets 1, it gets 2, for example. This lasts for the time you get the status until you end up losing the Pokémon for some reason. The Pokémon can also be put in the party alongside other Pokémon for around 24 hours after catching the virus to infect other Pokémon with it - once contracted, they get a full 24-hour contagion time and lifetime EV doubling.

This status can be denoted on the status screen and, initially, by speaking with a nurse in a Pokémon Center. It cannot be cured by any means other than waiting it out, and the Pokémon will be able to still get KO'd and Paralyzed and whatnot in battle. If the Pokémon is deposited into the PC or GTS, the countdown basically freezes. Once the status wears off, a small pink smiley face is found next to the Pokémon's markings on the status screen: this only marks that the contagion period is over, and, again, EV doubling is permanent.

I note this special status most prominently here because Pokérus does not have any effect on what happens in Super Training. Ultimately, Pokérus just quickens EV training, and has no use to the common player beyond that. It doesn't truly increase stats, just their growth, which plateaus earlier than normal.


^sr40|

Before accessing Super Training, you'll see a graph like that to the right. This graph represents two things: in green, the Pokémon's base-level stats for it's level and IVs. In yellow, you see its stats with the EVs in each stat applied. But what are "EVs"? Well, first, the game lamely (and inaccurately) calls them base stats. (Trust me, it'd be ridiculous if 12 Special Attack was applied for one two-minute game or something.)

EVs, or Effort Values, are semi-hidden stats. (I say semi-hidden because they were completely hidden in previous games and are only shown by the little graph here with no numerical representation given unless you do some Super Training, or save-and-reset when using a Reset Bag.) They are used to determine stat growth, and are earned through Super Training and through Pokémon battles. Each Pokémon will give off a set amount of EVs to the Pokémon, which can actually be shared through the Exp. Share. EVs can also be boosted by several EV-Boosting Items, and also lowered by some Berries - similar effects can be emulated through the Lumiose Juice Shoppe.

So, with that in mind, it is extremely important to note that EVs can be maxed out. There are six stats - HP, Attack, Defense, Special Attack, Special Defense, and Speed - to which EVs are applied. In any lone stat, you can have as many 252 EVs (255 in previous games, but they're irrelevant after 252 for reasons to be mentioned later). Overall, you can have a total 510 EVs across all six stats - that means only two stats can be truly maxed at any given time. If you want a look at the total EV count, look at the bar to the right of the EV stat chart. Plus, you can get an Effort Ribbon with full EVs, and you unlock Secret Super Training at 510 EVs.

How are EVs calculated with regards to stat increases? Well, the mechanics seem to have remained the same as in previous games: the total of EVs, divided by four then truncated, multiplied by your level divided by 100 equals to the total gain over the basal value. Or, in other terms:


 TOTAL STAT VALUE = ((Base Stat) + (EV Gain) + (IV Gain)) × (Nature Gain)

          EV GAIN = (EVs ÷ 4) × (Level ÷ 100)
          IV GAIN = (IVs)     × (Level ÷ 100)
      NATURE GAIN = ×1.1 if favorable, ×0.9 if not, ×1.0 if neither
Note that the function, "(EVs ÷ 4)", is truncated: that is to say, it is rounded down. For example, the highest amount of EVs allowed in one stat was once 255. (This is now 252, not like in previous generations - veterans, be SURE to note that!) That means, at Level 100, you should get 63.75 points due to EVs. However, because it is truncated (basically the decimal values are chopped off), you gain only 63 points. Thusly, EV trainers keep strict track of EVs because that means those looking for max stats could be wasting 6 EVs in maxing two stats: you could let them go to other stats for a single-point boost. Hey, it's something...

There are a number of hold items, also, that change the EV earnings beyond those already mentioned.


HOLD ITEM EFFECT
Macho Brace Doubles EV growth, but lowers Speed
Power Anklet Doubles the EV growth of Speed, but lowers Speed
Power Band Doubles the EV growth of Special Defense, but lowers Speed
Power Belt Doubles the EV growth of Defense, but lowers Speed
Power Bracer Doubles the EV growth of Attack, but lowers Speed
Power Lens Doubles the EV growth of Special Attack, but lowers Speed
Power Weight Doubles the EV growth of HP, but lowers Speed



Super Training: The Courses



Here, I will briefly detail each course. For the most part, there is no particular strategy, though, beyond aiming at the goals and going wild while blocking incoming shots. So I will simply give numerical data: EV increases and the like.

Courses are unlocked by levels. First you'll play Level 1 courses, then Level 2, and so on. After meeting a special condition, you will unlock the slightly different Secret Super Training, detailed further down.

 
Level Name Base EV Boosts Time to Beat
1 Hone Sp. Atk with Magnemite! Special Attack +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1 Raise Your HP with Wailmer! Max HP +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1 Boost Attack with Axew! Attack +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1 Buld Up Sp. Def with Tentacool! Special Defense +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1 Speed Up with the Noibat Regimen! Speed +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
1 Strengthen Defense with Geodude! Defense +4 30 seconds (2 minutes, 30 seconds left)
2 Home In on Magneton! Special Attack +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
2 Hit Relicanth's Weak Points! Max HP +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
2 Let Loose to Get Fraxure! Attack +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
2 Watch Out for Tentacruel's Bitbots! Special Defense +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
2 Hammer Aerodactyl with High-Speed Shots! Speed +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
2 Break Down Graveler's Barrier! Defense +8 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Skahe Off That Uncanny Magnezone! Special Attack +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Shoot Back! Get the Giant Wailord! Max HP +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Catch 'Em! Haxorus's Furious Attacks! Attack +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Kick Out! Get the Dragalge Corps! Special Defense +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Catch It! Noivern's Wild Wind! Speed +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)
3 Break It! Golem's Defensive Line Defense +12 1 minute (2 minutes left)

After having given a Pokémon 510 EVs - it doesn't have to all be in Super Training, or any - you can also do some extra Super Secret Training courses. While they won't provide any increases to your EVs (remember, max-EV Pokémon), they do provide items, especially if you do good!

Note that the "Time to Beat" stats here account for the occasional need to beat multiple balloons, and thusly the slight time boost given to you.


Level Name Time to Beat Notable Rewards
4 The Troubles Keep On Coming?! 2 minutes (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Wing EV-Boosting Items
5 The Leaf Stone Cup Begins! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Leaf Stone
5 The Fire Stone Cup Begins! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Fire Stone
5 The Water Stone Cup Begins! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Water Stone
5 Follow Those Fleeing Goals! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Thunder Stone
6 Watch Out! That's One Tricky Second Half! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Dusk Stone
6 An Opening of Lightning-Quick Attacks! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Shiny Stone
6 Those Long Shots Are No Long Shot! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Dawn Stone
7 Scatterbug Lugs Back! 2 minutes (2 minutes left) Wing EV-Boosting Items
7 A Barrage of Bitbots! 1 minute, 30 seconds (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Wing EV-Boosting Items
7 Drag Down Hydreigon! 2 minutes (2 minutes left) Sun/Moon Stone
8 The Battle for the Best: Version X/Y 3 minutes (1 minute, 30 seconds left) Any of the above stones!



Super Training: The Training Bags



After finishing Super Training sessions, as well as just at random in the field, you can gather Training Bags. These can be used via the lower-right icon in the Super Training menu before starting a session. There are multiple types: the effects vary, each can be used only once, and you can have twelve individual bags at once. Once activated, the Bag appears next to the Pokémon on the Touch Screen - they will beat it up at one hit per minute, or you can tap it to make them hit it, whichever suits what you're doing at the time. Below are the Training Bags and their effects.

Training Bag Effect
Attack Bag L Boosts Attack EVs by 12
Attack Bag M Boosts Attack EVs by 4
Attack Bag S Boosts Attack EVs by 1
Big-Shot Bag Makes you more likely to hit goals when next playing Super Training
Defense Bag L Boosts Defense EVs by 12
Defense Bag M Boosts Defense EVs by 4
Defense Bag S Boosts Defense EVs by 1
Double-Up Bag Doubles the EV gains from the next Super Training session (+8/+16/+24)
HP Bag L Boosts Max HP EVs by 12
HP Bag M Boosts Max HP EVs by 4
HP Bag S Boosts Max HP EVs by 1
Reset Bag Reduces all of the Pokémon's EVs to zero
Soothing Bag Increases the Pokémon's Happiness
Sp. Atk. Bag L Boosts Special Attack EVs by 12
Sp. Atk. Bag M Boosts Special Attack EVs by 4
Sp. Atk. Bag S Boosts Special Attack EVs by 1
Sp. Def. Bag L Boosts Special Defense EVs by 12
Sp. Def. Bag M Boosts Special Defense EVs by 4
Sp. Def. Bag S Boosts Special Defense EVs by 1
Swiftness Bag Makes the Pokémon move faster when next playing Super Training
Speed Bag L Boosts Speed EVs by 12
Speed Bag M Boosts Speed EVs by 4
Speed Bag S Boosts Speed EVs by 1
Team Flare Bag After using this, until the "happy face" on the Pokémon goes away, hitting the normal black bag makes it more likely to find other Super Training bags
Toughen-Up Bag Reduces the points lost when hit in your next Super Training session


Pokémon Breeding



Sectional Flowchart



On a general level, if you want to produce a "Pokémon Breeding Process", please take note that it must actually result in something special. Having 31 IVs in all six stats is special. Having them in one, not so much. Somehow raising the chances of finding a Shiny? That's special. Raising the chances of getting a "crap" Pokémon? Not really. If you want to submit something, see the Legalities section.




Pokémon Breeding: A Primer



To consider what Pokémon breeding is, we must consider how animals reproduce. On the superficial level, it generally requires a male and a female: such holds true here for the most part. Unlike normal, though, Pokémon typically lay Eggs to bear baby Pokémon. (The only exception is the canon surrounding the live birth of Mewtwo from Mew, given in the Kanto-region games.) Normally, Pokémon breeding is more than simply about getting lower-evolution Pokémon or spawning massive numbers of starters: in fact, it is the most certain way to guarantee that your Pokémon can get the most ideal stats and movesets possible! However, this particular primer is designed for Pokémon beginners - if you want to get into the gnitty-gritty of things, the other sections will sate you.

As you progress through the game, you'll eventually hit [[Route 7]]. After some events there and at the Parfum Palace, you'll be allowed to reach the majority of the route past that big bridge. Just beyond said bridge is the Pokémon Daycare. There, you can leave two Pokémon and they'll stay there. Typically, beginners just leave Pokémon there for the purposes of leveling up: they'll earn 1 EXP. per step you take. You can get the Pokémon back at a base cost $100, plus an additional $100 per level earned. You, however, cannot dictate how moves are learned or deleted, and level-up evolutions do not occur, so look out!

Now, Pokémon breeding... Obviously, you'll need two Pokémon: one a male, and one a female. (The little mark that appears beside their name in battle represents that: the blue arrow is male, the pink cross is female. No mark means the Pokémon has no gender and generally cannot breed.) There are blatant exceptions to this rule, but more on that momentarily. When you leave two Pokémon there of opposite genders (or other situations), there is a chance that you can speak with the man outside the Daycare to receive an Egg.

The Pokémon within the Egg can inherit a number of things, depending upon certain conditions - these include IVs (which influence stat growth), Nature (which can give a 10% bonus/loss to some stats), moves (but only some!), and species. If you're playing one of the older games, you can execute a glitch known as the "Pomeg Berry Glitch" (see the game's Cheat page on GameFAQs - only Generations III & IV) to know this stuff for the most part. However, Pokémon X/Y obviously prevent that. Nice bit of trivia nonetheless.

So, we come down to it - how to make the Egg hatch? The Egg hatches by carrying it in your party and walking/biking/skating around. Eggs can hatch in anywhere from 5,000 to 31,000 steps (obviously I'm being inspecific), depending on the species within the Egg. It's just walking, so beginners don't really need to worry. Eventually, the Egg will hatch. This process can be sped up by having Pokémon with the Magma Armor or Flame Body abilities.

That's the gist of it. But if you want to manipulate this in a more beneficial way, read on...




Pokémon Breeding: A More Technical Primer



This section presumes you know all of the info detailed in the previous primer, and thusly will have that info mostly glossed over if ever mentioned.


~ Egg Groups ~

So, then, you have two Pokémon you want to breed. As detailed earlier, I said there were exceptions to the rules about gender. Firstly, we have to consider Ditto. Ditto is almost a wild card in Pokémon breeding, so much so that he gets his own Egg Group (more on that in a bit). Basically, he is allowed to breed with pretty much every Pokémon other than legendary Pokémon - and, even then, the latter has an exception in which breeding Ditto and Manaphy yields Phione. If it's of the "No Eggs" group, then Ditto still cannot breed with it. 

Now that we're getting onto species, it's time to talk about Egg Groups. Egg Groups help to determine what Pokémon can breed together for desired species: without proper knowledge of this, you can easily end up with crap Pokémon. I left this undetailed previously because an obvious rule of thumb is that two Pokémon of the same species yields the same Pokémon or a pre-evolutionary form of it. That much is true. However, knowing Egg Groups widens the field a little: it's almost impossible to find some Pokémon, after all. You can see the Pokémon Stats (Breeding) on the particular Egg Groups and gender ratios of Pokémon. The general principle with breeding is that if the two parents are of the same Egg Group and opposite genders, the child will be the lowest evolution of the female parent. For example: a male Chesnaught and a female Delphox should yield a Fennekin.

Again, there are exceptions to even that. This mostly comes through from species that only have Pokémon of a single gender. A key example are the male and female Nidoran Pokémon - they're of the same Egg Group, sure, but you'd only get Nidoran under the above conditions, no matter how many Eggs. The exception is that, if two gender-exclusive species are bred, then there is a 50% chance of the resultant Pokémon being either species.



~ Genetic Engineering ~

Now, onto inheritance... (Sorry, couldn't resist the title.)

So, a number of things can be inherited through breeding - I glossed over these earlier: moves, IVs, Nature, species, and abilities. Here's the specifics:


  • Gender: Gender is, and always has been, the critical concept around which revolves all of Pokémon breeding - only certain genders can bring over certain things to their children, and strict use of that is key in managing to get a "perfect" Pokémon. That said, nothing can influence the gender of a Pokémon in an Egg - it's purely left up to the RNG. Depending on the Pokémon species, you can 50%-50%, 25%-75%, 12.5%-87.5%, or 0%-100% gender ratios if the Pokémon has one at all. However, just because a Pokémon has a gender does not mean it can breed. It's important to note that; you're not intended to breed Latias, after all. >_>

  • Moves: Only certain moves can be inherited, and it's not necessarily clear what. I do know if a move is something the Pokémon would normally learn by leveling up, it can be passed down by either or both parents knowing it. Certain Egg Moves, often only found on certain species, can be passed down by both parents - not every move is an Egg Move, keep that in mind.

  • IVs: IVs help to determine stat growth by Level 100: for each IV in a stat, you will then earn 1 point at Level 100. IVs range from 0 to 31 in all stats. Generally, it's determined by an RNG in the game if you don't hold certain items. If the named item below is held when breeding, there's a 100% chance that the named stat will be inherited.
    • Destiny Knot: 5 random IVs, taken from both parents (only 1 need be held)
    • Power Anklet: Speed
    • Power Band: Special Defense
    • Power Belt: Defense
    • Power Bracer: Attack
    • Power Lens: Special Attack
    • Power Weight: Max HP

  • Nature: Pokémon have specific Natures, which you can effectively engineer so that you get better stats (+10%). Generally, it is determined at random: 1 in 25 for the desired Nature. However, holding an Everstone guarantees that the child gets the holder's Nature - obviously, if the parents differ in Nature and both hold Everstones, it's a 50-50 crapshoot. If you want to see the effects of certain Natures, see the Pokémon Natures section of the Mini-Pokédex.

  • Species: Previously mentioned, if two Pokémon are in the same Egg Group, then the child is of the female's species, except under specific circumstances.

  • Abilities: In Pokémon X/Y, every Pokémon has two slots for regular abilities (see Pokémon Stats (General) for the list). In the named list, many final-listed abilities are a Hidden Ability, unless it is the only one (which means it WILL have it). Otherwise... When it comes to the first-listed one, the child has a 80% chance of inheriting it, and 20% for the second one: first and second refer to the female parent's current Ability and the one it doesn't have, respectively. For example, let's say you're breeding two Fennekin. If the female has Blaze, then there is an 80% chance the child will have Blaze, or 20% for Magician. Likewise, if the female Fennekin has Magician, then there is an 80% chance of the child getting Magician and 20% for Blaze.

  • Hidden Abilities: There are special, rare abilities called Hidden Abilities - they were normally only found through the Dream World on the Global Link in B/W or some Pokémon just outright had them. They're a bit different when it comes to inheritence in that the female or the male can know it. If the female has it, there's an as-of-yet-undetermined high chance of it being inherited, and it's furthered with the male also knowing it. If you don't have a female with it, you can breed the male and Ditto for a chance at having it.

  • Pokéball: Normally, one of the more obvious ways to detect illegitimate Pokémon on pure observation was the Pokéball they were caught in. Since some Pokémon, such as Munchlax, are only available through breeding, you would have to be suspicious in previous generations if the Munchlax was caught in a Great Ball - or pretty much anything other than a Poké Ball. This is different in X/Y - now the Pokéball that caught the female will be seen as having caught the child. This has a bit more of a strategic effect than you think. I mean, if you throw out a Dragonite from a Poké Ball online, your opponent could be certain it knows the Egg Move Iron Tail to counteract any Ice-types he may send it against it. If it comes out in an Ultra Ball or the like, he can be more certain that you found it (or a pre-evolutionary form) in the wild and it won't know it. But since this is masked, no one knows... Of course, there is also the Luxury Ball benefit, too.

  • Shininess: The Shiny attribute of a Pokémon cannot be inherited. However, the Masuda method, which basically makes you breed with international Pokémon, allows Shinies to be almost six times more common. The specifics... Pokémon in the wild have a chance of being Shiny equal to 1 in 4,096 in this game, which is basically 0.0244%. You can use PokéRadar/Fishing chaining to boost it up to 40 in 4,096 or so (0.976%) if you're lucky. Then again, those preferring to breed can use two Pokémon from different-nationality games (basically yours and another country's) to make the chances 1 in 1,366, close to 3 in 4,096, or about 0.0732%. It's still rare as crap, but it's probably worth it if chaining ain't your thing. (That stuff can be found in Shinies, Chain Fishing, & The PokéRadar.)


~ Mechanics of the Egg ~

Let's first discuss getting the Egg. When you speak to the Daycare Man before an Egg has appeared, he can say a number of things. Depending on what he says - which itself is independent to certain conditions - there is a specific chance of finding an Egg. Generally, using traded Pokémon or those of the same species is best. Eggs can potentially be found with every 256 steps in the field. So, what does he have to say?

(Keep in mind "ID" refers to both the seen ID on your Trainer Card and the hidden Secret ID that you never know of. Basically, there are 100,000 values for each, and 10,000,000,000 total permutations, so you can basically consider it as "traded".)


Condition Do the Pokémon Get Along? Chance of Finding Eggs
Different Egg Groups The Pokémon prefer to play with others 0% (generally)
Different Species, Same ID The two Pokémon don't like each other 20%
Same Species, Same ID The Pokémon seem to get along 50%
Different Species, Different ID The Pokémon seem to get along 50%
Same Species, Different ID The two get along very well 70%

Note that the Oval Charm, found by completing the Kalos Pokédex and going to Professor Sycamore, increases the rate at which you can find Eggs. Specifics are still unknown on that though.

Remember how I earlier glossed over Egg hatching by simply saying it would hatch in 5,000 ~ 30,000 steps? There is a more specific way to calculate this:


  TOTAL STEPS = (B + N) × Y
          "B" = Base steps, a value given to each species
          "N" = A random number, either 0 or 1
          "Y" = A random number, either 255 or 256
What does this mean? Basically, there is not much variance in the amount of steps it takes to hatch an Egg. At most, the variance is (B + 256) - that means the difference when "N=0, Y=255" and "N=1, Y=256" will equal the number of base steps, plus 256. The highest base step value I can recall is 120, so basically 400 steps is the general variance. Most of the time, you'll see a formula of "(B + 1) × 255", the most common formula I've come across. Again, it's just walking, so it's not like it matters, really.

Also note that some abilities can reduce the number of steps taken. If a Pokémon in the party has either the Magma Armor or Flame Body abilities, the steps needed are halved.

I think that finally covers it.




Pokémon Breeding: Important Items



I'll list this as a separate sub-section just in case people want to know the specific items associate with breeding. The effects below do not represent their whole cumulative effects per the comprehensive Items Listings section, just what pertains to breeding. All of the items must be held by a parent to obtain the named effects, which are still random without both holding the same item unless otherwise stated.

Item Name Effects
Destiny Knot Allows five random IVs to be inherited from the parents
Everstone Guarantees the holder's Nature to be passed down
Full Incense Lets Snorlax breed Munchlax when held
Lax Incense Lets Wobbuffet breed Wynaut when held
Light Orb Lets Pikachu breed Pichu that know Volt Tackle
Luck Incense Lets Chansey/Blissey breed Happiny when held
Odd Incense Lets Mr. Mime breed Mime Jr. when held
Power Anklet May pass down the Speed IVs of the holder
Power Band May pass down the Special Defense IVs of the holder
Power Belt May pass down the Defense IVs of the holder
Power Bracer May pass down the Attack IVs of the holder
Power Lens May pass down the Special Attack IVs of the holder
Power Weight May pass down the Max HP IVs of the holder
Pure Incense Lets Chimecho breed Chingling when held
Rock Incense Lets Sudowoodo breed Bonsly when held
Rose Incense Lets Roselia/Roserade breed Budew when held
Sea Incense Lets Marill/Azumarill breed Azurill when held
Wave Incense Lets Mantine breed Mantyke when held



Pokémon Breeding: Exclusive Species



When it comes to Pokédex completion, some species of Pokémon can only be found by breeding them. This section denotes which Pokémon are typically breeding-exclusive and how to get them. I list all of the Pokémon that typically are breeding-exclusive simply for the sake of simplicity; some actually can be found in the game by other means as noted below, but we're here anyways, right?

Pokémon Parents Method Alternate Locations
Azurill Marill, Azumarill Breed while holding Sea Incense Route 3, Route 22
Bonsly Sudowoodo Breed while holding Rock Incense N/A
Budew Roselia, Roserade Breed while holding Rose Incense Route 4, Route 7 - In Full
Chingling Chimecho Breed while holding Pure Incense Route 11, Reflection Cave
Cleffa Clefairy, Clefable Just breed; nothing special to note N/A
Elekid Electabuzz, Electivire Just breed; nothing special to note N/A
Happiny Chansey, Blissey Breed while holding Luck Incense N/A
Igglybuff Jigglypuff, Wigglytuff Just breed; nothing special to note N/A
Magby Magmar, Magmortar Just breed; nothing special to note N/A
Mantyke Mantine Breed while holding Wave Incense The Tower of Mastery, Route 12, Azure Bay
Mime Jr. Mr. Mime Breed while holding Odd Incense Reflection Cave
Munchlax Snorlax Breed while holding Full Incense N/A
Phione Manaphy & Ditto Breed Manaphy and Ditto together for Phione N/A
Pichu Pikachu, Raichu Just breed; hold Light Orb to learn Volt Tackle N/A
Smoochum Jynx Just breed; nothing special to note Frost Cavern
Tyrogue Hitmonlee, Hitmonchan, Hitmontop Just breed; nothing special to note N/A
Wynaut Wobbuffet Breed while holding Lax Incense N/A



Pokémon Breeding Processes: The Masuda Method



  • PREREQUISITES:
    • Access to the Daycare
    • At least one Pokémon foreign to your region (this is noted by a regional abbreviation on the Pokémon's status screen, like JPN for Japan)
    • A foreign-region Ditto makes stuff like this really efficient in that you can work it with Pokémon with any gender

  • BENEFITS:
    • Shiny Pokémon become approximately more common (3 in 4,096)

DETAILS:

The Masuda method, seemingly named for Junichi Masuda, a person involved in the development of the Pokémon series, has one notable benefit: Shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiny Pokémon! Shiny Pokémon are not extremely notable on a level of depth. Other than Generation II, Shiny Pokémon typically did not have exceptional stats, and their movesets and the like were the same as their non-Shiny counterparts. But the one thing that makes them so desireable on the surface is their coloration. Pokémon often look different when Shiny - a Shiny Gyarados is red instead of blue, a Shiny Sceptile is cyan instead of green, a Shiny Moltres is pink instead of yellow/red, a Shiny Salamence is green not blue, a Shiny Rayquaza is black instead of green, and so on and so forth.

Under most circumstances, Shiny Pokémon are extremely rare. The odds of finding them are 12 in 65,536, commonly rounded to 1 in 4,096, about 0.0244%. Think about that for a moment. You might go through 500 wild battles in a relatively completionist playthrough X/Y, yet that's barely 1/10 of the way to the 1 in 10,000 a Shiny Pokémon will appear in. Normally, finding Shinies requires tedious looking in an area. Additional methods to increase the rate of Shinies have been brought in over the years - like forced encounters (Shiny Gyarados in Generation II/IV), special items (Shiny Charm, B2/W2, tripled rate), and PokéRadar chaining (Gen. IV/VI, 40x more effective at best).

Of course, all of them still require some level of work. The one with the least true "work" involved is the Masuda method of Pokémon breeding. In it, you will need two Pokémon, each from a different region - that means you can have one of your own, and one from elsewhere. The region is denoted on the Pokémon's status screen by some form of abbreviation where yours are normally blank. (Plus, Japanese/Korean characters are a dead give-away. =P)

Basically, you breed the two together ... and that's it. There's nothing special involved with this method that you don't want to be - if you're just looking for a Shiny, without desiring certain IVs or moves or Nature or whatever, you can just breed them, but this otherwise still falls under normal breeding doctrines.

The chance of finding Shiny Pokémon like this is 1 in 1,366 - about three times more effective than random hunting/breeding. It's not much, but it's practically the only way to, for example, get Shiny starter Pokémon... ;)

Keep in mind Wonder Trade for this - lots of people use that. As someone from the U.S., I get foreign Pokémon 40% ~ 50% of the time, which means residents of other regions are very likely to get something foreign (if just the U.S. dominates half the market).




Pokémon Breeding Processes: Maxing IVs



  • PREREQUISITES:
    • Access to the Daycare
    • One Everstone for ideal Nature
    • One Destiny Knot for ideal IVs
    • A Ditto with two perfect IVs (typically from Friend Safari, but I think Pokémon Village works, too, but much less likely)
    • Another Ditto with different perfect IVs
    • A third Ditto with different perfect IVs

  • BENEFITS:
    • A Pokémon with 31 IVs in all six stats!
    • A Pokémon with an ideal Nature for whatever stat you want (if you use the Everstone)
    • It can be coupled with the Masuda method above if you have enough foreign Pokémon

DETAILS:

This is a method for breeding Pokémon in such a way as to breed them to have perfect IVs. Breeding Pokémon can be a tedious process, especially when you don't know what you're even passing down - the hold items can help, but... Well, anyways, this method is to get you max IVs on all six stats - as you recall, IVs boost stat growth by their value (0~31) at Level 100, and proportionately at lower levels. Combining this with an ideal Nature allows you to effectively boost a stat 34.1 points above the base value - with maxed EVs (252+) in a stat, you can increase a stat by almost 100 points! When it comes to powerhouses like Rhydon in Attack (130 base) or tanks like Blissey (255 base HP), these are significant increases. God forbid you max out the EVs, IVs, and give an offense-centric Nature to a Shuckle knowing Power Trick. o_o;;

Anyways, the process requires a Ditto with two perfect IVs. The submitter of the method specifically mentioned the Friend Safari, although I suppose the rare chance of finding one from the Pokémon Village also works. You can also combine this with the Masuda method - previous sub-section - for somewhat likely Shiny Pokémon.

So, once you have the Ditto, you need a female of the desired Pokémon species. Whoever has the desired Nature should hold the Everstone during breeding to give it to the child. The child will have that Nature. Next, make the child hold a Destiny Knot and breed that with the second Ditto with different 31-IVs. Once that Egg hatches, breed the child (this time now holding the Destiny Knot) with the third Ditto. Hopefully, this results in a child with perfect IVs - if not, the Destiny Knot's RNG kinda screwed you, so try again!



IMPORTANT NOTE:

Often, you might find Pokémon with only five maxed IVs, or actually just want one. The main reason is their Attack and Special Attack for offense. Typically, people will engineer Pokémon in breeding so that the Pokémon's higher of Attack or Special Attack in their base stats is favored by Nature, EVs, and IVs, often letting the other of the two go completely neglected. (For example, 252 EVs and 31 IVs in Attack with an Adamant Nature, which +10% Attack and -10% Special Attack.) This can result in a ~100 point boost and much saved time: since you don't have to work on one of the stats, EVs and such can be devoted to the other(s), time is very much saved, and you don't have to figure out which stat you want the Nature to detract from. The main reason for this is that the Trainer will have an only-Physical (Attack/Defense) or only-Special (Special Attack/Special Defense) moveset. If you are opting for such a moveset, you are more than welcome to ignore the stat you're not even going to use whatsoever. Other than Pokémon with varied movesets, 6 IVs only has a use in influencing Hidden Power and for breeding with the Destiny Knot.



EXAMPLE:

Just in case the previous description wasn't very clear, let's say I want a perfect-IV Delphox. I will first then want a perfect-IV Fennekin. So, this is what I bring to the situation.


  • What I Use:
    • Delphox
    • A Ditto nicknamed "HP/Sp.Atk", with maxed Max HP and Special Attack IVs
    • A Ditto nicknamed "Df/Sp.Def", with maxed Defense and Special Defense IVs - must have the preferred Nature
    • A Ditto nicknamed "Spd./Atk.", with maxed Speed and Attack IVs - must have the preferred Nature
    • One Destiny Knot
    • One Everstone (if I feel like breeding a certain Nature)

  • Process:
    • Breed Delphox and a Ditto - for this, I chose "HP/Sp.Atk." to carry those IVs
    • Whoever has the desired Nature will hold the Everstone
    • This results in a Fennekin with (at least) two perfect IVs
    • Breed the first-generation child Fennekin with Ditto - now the one named "Df/Sp.Def." for those IVs
    • The first-generation child Fennekin will hold a Destiny Knot, and Ditto with the Everstone
    • This results in a second-generation child Fennekin, probably with four perfect IVs
    • Breed the second-generation child Fennekin (holding Destiny Knot) with the final Ditto, this one named "Spd./Atk." for those IVs and holding the Everstone
    • This generally results in a third-generation child Fennekin with 31 IVs in all six stats and an ideal Nature, which I can level up to Level 36 to become Delphox


Battle Chateau



Sectional Flowchart






Battle Chateau: A Primer


^sr34|

The Battle Chateau is found pretty early in the game while going along [[Route 7]] - it is, in fact, the only real building there. Within, you will meet Korrina who superficially explains it. I shall go into more, of course.

The Battle Chateau is a place for battle. (What a surprise.) Your goal is to progress up through the ranks of nobility by proving your skill in battle. Thusly, the more Trainers (within the Battle Chateau) that you beat, the higher and more pompous your rank. =P Fighting Trainers, especially late in the game, will become a tedious business. Firstly, they are pretty random. They change every few hours, sometimes coming in at random while you're fighting. Late-game players will find themselves emptying the Chateau in like ten minutes; if you're wondering why, just leave and have a nap or something.

For the most, the Trainers encountered will be random. Of course, Game Freak couldn't let us off that easily: once your rank gets high enough, Gym Leaders, and even the Elite Four and Champion will begin to make cameos here. Those battles I can describe a bit better, though your strategy really is pivotal upon where you are in the game.

That's about it - the purpose is to be the stuffing out of these Trainers to somehow raise through the ranks of nobility. There's no real other benefit to this, though - it's just something to do.




Battle Chateau: Writs



I hope you're rich, because this stuff will burn through your wallet: in the post-game, actually, it's about the only thing worth spending money on. =P Writs allow for a number of things to occur. To send a Writ, you need to speak with the woman near the Chateau entrance to buy and send a Writ. Writs will last only until midnight, though - God forbid you send one at 11:59 PM. XD Described below are the Chateau Writs and their effects; if you don't have one, you need to rise further through the ranks.

Writ Cost Effect
Writ of Invitation $50,000 Makes more Trainers come to the Chateau.
Silver Writ of Invitation $50,000 Makes a lot more Trainers come to the Chateau.
Gold Writ of Invitation $50,000 Makes a vast number of Trainers come to the Chateau.
Writ of Challenge $50,000 All Pokémon fought are boosted in Level by 5.
Blue Writ of Challenge $50,000 All Pokémon fought are lowered in Level by 5.
Red Writ of Challenge $50,000 All Pokémon fought are boosted in Level by 10.
Black Writ of Challenge $50,000 All Pokémon fought are boosted in Level by 20.



Battle Chateau: Ranks of Nobility



Battling people in the Battle Chateau slowly but surely will let you rise through the ranks of nobility. While I've yet to find the specific conditions for each, I can say that one goes from this to that as battles continue. Note, of course, that these ranks are gender-specific, which is important to note for anyone wishing to deal with Medals.

Male Ranks Female Ranks
Baron Baroness
Viscount Viscountess
Earl Countess
Marquis Marchioness
Duke Duchess
Grand Duke Grand Duchess



Battle Chateau: Special Trainers: Marquis/Marchioness



BOSS: Marchioness Viola

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Masquerain Bug/Flying Level 40 N/A
Vivillon Bug/Flying Level 40 N/A

  • Masquerain: Masquerain is doubly-weak to Rock, weak to Fire, Electric, Ice, and Flying, and immune to Ground. It is prone to use Water-type moves for the most part over Bug or Flying, as it did evolve from the Water/Bug Surskit - those moves are effective against Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Vivillon: While it has the same type weaknesses as Masquerain, this Pokémon is more prone to Bug- and Flying-type moves, strong against Psychic, Dark, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.


BOSS: Marquis Grant

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Tyrantrum Rock/Dragon Level 40 N/A
Aurorus Rock/Ice Level 40 N/A

  • Tyrantrum: All he's doing is using an evolved form of the team we fought against? ... Anyways, he is weak to Ice, Fighting, Ground, Dragon, Steel, and Fairy - a multitude, basically.

  • Amaura: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting (x4), Steel (x4), Water, Grass, Ground, and Rock. It still can use the Ice-type Aurora Beam to hurt your Grass, Ground, and Flying types, though.


BOSS: Marchioness Korrina

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Level 40 N/A
Machamp Fighting Level 40 N/A

  • Hawlucha: Her opener is weak to Psychic, Fairy, Ice, Electric, and Flying, and is immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.

  • Machamp: This muscular Poké is weak to Flying, Fairy, and Psychic, and advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.


BOSS: Marquis Ramos

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Victreebel Grass/Poison Level 40 N/A
Gogoat Grass Level 40 N/A

  • Victreebel: Victreebel is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic, and advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.

  • Gogoat: Go-go-Gogoat! ... >_> Anyways, Gogoat is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Poison, and Bug, while being advantageous over Rock, Water, and Ground.


BOSS: Marquis Clemont

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Magneton Steel/Electric Level 40 N/A
Heliolisk Normal/Electric Level 40 N/A

  • Magneton: Magneton is doubly weak to Ground, weak to Fire and Fighting, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Flying, and Water.

  • Heliolisk: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting and Ground, with an immunity to Ghost. It is advantageous over Water and Flying.


BOSS: Marchioness Valerie

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mr. Mime Psychic/Fairy Level 40 N/A
Sylveon Fairy Level 40 N/A

  • Mr. Mime: Mr. Mime is weak to Poison, Ghost, and Steel, with an immunity to Dragon. It is advantageous over Poison, Fighting, Dragon, and Dark.

  • Sylveon: This newest Eevee-lution is weak to Poison and Steel, and immune to Dragon. It is advantageous over Dragon, Dark, and Fighting.


BOSS: Marchioness Olympia

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Sigilyph Psychic/Flying Level 40 N/A
Meowstic Psychic Level 40 N/A

  • Sigilyph: Sigilyph is weak to Dark, Ghost, Ice, Electric, and Rock, and is immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Poison, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.

  • Meowstic: This Pokémon is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug; it is also advantageous over Fighting and Poison.


BOSS: Marquis Wulfric

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Cryogonal Ice Level 40 N/A
Avalugg Ice Level 40 N/A

Both Pokémon, as it turns out, are almost the same in type data, plus similar in movesets and power. They are weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting; Cryogonal is immune to Ground as well. They are generally advantageous over Flying, Ground, and Grass.




Battle Chateau: Special Trainers: Duke/Duchess



BOSS: Duchess Viola

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Masquerain Bug/Flying Level 50 N/A
Vivillon Bug/Flying Level 50 N/A

  • Masquerain: Masquerain is doubly-weak to Rock, weak to Fire, Electric, Ice, and Flying, and immune to Ground. It is prone to use Water-type moves for the most part over Bug or Flying, as it did evolve from the Water/Bug Surskit - those moves are effective against Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Vivillon: While it has the same type weaknesses as Masquerain, this Pokémon is more prone to Bug- and Flying-type moves, strong against Psychic, Dark, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.


BOSS: Duke Grant

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Tyrantrum Rock/Dragon Level 50 N/A
Aurorus Rock/Ice Level 50 N/A

  • Tyrantrum: All he's doing is using an evolved form of the team we fought against? ... Anyways, he is weak to Ice, Fighting, Ground, Dragon, Steel, and Fairy - a multitude, basically.

  • Amaura: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting (x4), Steel (x4), Water, Grass, Ground, and Rock. It still can use the Ice-type Aurora Beam to hurt your Grass, Ground, and Flying types, though.


BOSS: Duchess Korrina

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Level 50 N/A
Lucario Fighting/Steel Level 50 N/A - holds Lucarionite, though!

  • Hawlucha: Her opener is weak to Psychic, Fairy, Ice, Electric, and Flying, and is immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.

  • Lucario: Heh, this will look familiar... It is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark. Plus, it can Mega Evolve, so prepare for that!


BOSS: Duke Ramos

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Victreebel Grass/Poison Level 50 N/A
Gogoat Grass Level 50 N/A

  • Victreebel: Victreebel is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Psychic, and advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, and Grass.

  • Gogoat: Go-go-Gogoat! ... >_> Anyways, Gogoat is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Poison, and Bug, while being advantageous over Rock, Water, and Ground.


BOSS: Duke Clemont

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Magnezone Steel/Electric Level 50 N/A
Heliolisk Normal/Electric Level 50 N/A

  • Magnezone: Magnezone, like Magneton before it, is doubly weak to Ground, weak to Fire and Fighting, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Flying, and Water.

  • Heliolisk: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting and Ground, with an immunity to Ghost. It is advantageous over Water and Flying.


BOSS: Duchess Valerie

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Mawile Steel/Fairy Level 50 N/A
Sylveon Fairy Level 50 N/A

  • Mawile: One of the rare party line-up changes among the Gym Leaders... Anyways, Mawile is weak to Fire and Ground, and immune to Dragon and Poison. It is advantageous over Dark, Dragon, Fighting, Ice, and Rock.

  • Sylveon: This newest Eevee-lution is weak to Poison and Steel, and immune to Dragon. It is advantageous over Dragon, Dark, and Fighting.


BOSS: Duchess Olympia

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Slowking Psychic/Water Level 50 N/A
Meowstic Psychic Level 50 N/A

  • Slowking: This Pokémon is weak to Grass, Electric, Dark, Ghost, and Bug. It has advantages over Fire, Rock, Ground, Fighting, and Poison.

  • Meowstic: This Pokémon is weak to Dark, Ghost, and Bug; it is also advantageous over Fighting and Poison.


BOSS: Duke Wulfric

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Abomasnow Ice/Grass Level 50 N/A
Avalugg Ice Level 50 N/A

  • Abomasnow: Abomasnow is doubly-weak to Fire, and is weak to Fighting, Poison, Flying, Bug, Rock, and Steel. It has type-based advantages over Flying, Ground, Water, and Rock.

  • Avalugg: This Pokémon is weak to Fire, Rock, Steel, and Fighting, and is advantageous over Flying, Ground, and Grass.


BOSS: Duke Wiksttrom

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Scizor Steel/Bug Level 55 N/A
Aegislash Steel/Ghost Level 55 N/A
Probopass Steel/Rock Level 55 N/A

  • Scizor: This buzzer is doubly weak to Fire, which is his only weakness, and is immune to Poison. He is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Psychic, Grass, and Dark

  • Aegislash: Ah, this ... whatever you call him. He is weak to Fire, Ground, Ghost, and Dark, and takes no damage from Normal, Poison, or Fighting. He is advantageous over Ice, Rock, Ghost, and Psychic.

  • Probopass: This chunk o' stuff is doubly weak to both Fighting and Ground, normally weak to Water, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Ice, Rock, Bug, Flying, and Fire.


BOSS: Duchess Malva

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Pyroar Fire/Normal Level 55 N/A
Talonflame Fire/Flying Level 55 N/A
Chandelure Fire/Ghost Level 55 N/A

  • Pyroar: This Pokémon is weak to Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground, and takes no damage from Ghost. It is advantageous over Bug, Grass, Ice, and Steel.

  • Talonflame: The flying Talonflame is doubly-weak to Rock, weak to Water and Electric, and takes no damage from Ground. It has an advantage over Grass, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Fighting.

  • Chandelure: This Pokémon is weak to Water, Rock, Ground, Ghost, and Dark; it takes no damage from Normal or Fighting. It is also advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Bug, Ice, Grass, and Steel.


BOSS: Duchess Drasna

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Dragalge Dragon/Poison Level 55 N/A
Altaria Dragon/Flying Level 55 N/A
Noivern Dragon/Flying Level 55 N/A

  • Dragalge: For this one, you'll find weaknesses to Psychic, Ground, Dragon, Fairy, and Ice, plus advantages to Dragon and Grass. When fighting, do try to avoid contact as you could get Poisoned.

  • Altaria: This puffball (sorta) is doubly-weak to Ice, weak to Rock, Fairy, and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.

  • Noivern: Finally, we find the stat-heavy Noivern. It is doubly-weak to Ice, weak to Rock, Fairy, and Dragon, and takes no damage from Ground. It is advantageous over Dragon, Fighting, Bug, and Grass.


BOSS: Duke Siebold

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Clawitzer Water Level 55 N/A
Starmie Water/Psychic Level 55 N/A
Barbaracle Water/Rock Level 55 N/A

  • Clawitzer: Siebold will open with a basic Water type; they're weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Starmie: Starmie is weak to Grass, Electric, Dark, Bug, and Ghost, and has advantages over Fighting, Poison, Rock, Fire, and Ground.

  • Barbaracle: This guy is doubly-weak to Grass, normally weak to Electric, Fighting, and Ground, and has advantages over Fire, Rock, Ground, Flying, Ice, and Bug.




Battle Chateau: Special Trainers: Grand Duke/Grand Duchess



BOSS: Grand Duchess Diantha

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Hawlucha Fighting/Flying Level 60 N/A
Gourgeist Ghost/Grass Level 60 N/A
Goodra Dragon Level 60 N/A
Gardevoir Psychic/Fairy Level 60 N/A - does Mega-Evolve, though

  • Hawlucha: Diantha's opener is weak to Psychic, Fairy, Ice, Electric, and Flying, and is immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, Dark, Bug, Grass, and Fighting.

  • Gourgeist: This weird Pokémon is weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, Ghost, and Dark, and takes no damage from Normal or Fighting. It is advantageous over Ghost, Psychic, Rock, Water, and Ground.

  • Goodra: A plain Dragon, Goodra is weak to Ice, Fairy, and Dragon and advantageous over Dragon.

  • Gardevoir: Expect this one to Mega-Evolve: it's mostly for show, as nothing really changes beyond its statistical prowess. It will be weak to Poison, Ghost, and Steel, and immune to Dragon. It will have advantages over Dragon, Fighting, Dark, and Poison.



Battle Maison



Sectional Flowchart






Battle Maison: A Primer


^sr35|

The Battle Maison is a facility similar to the Battle Towers and the Battle Subways from the previous games. The premise of playing here is to get a very long battling streak against trainers: using only one team, no items from the bag, and with healings between each battle, you need to get as far as possible. In doing so, you earn BP to exchange for numerous valuable items. This is harder than it sounds.

The facility is found in Kiloude City after beating the game: it is the gold mansion in the center of the town. If you go further within to the battling area, you can speak with the receptionist to begin battle. There are a number of restrictions.


  • Flat Battles: All battles will be Flat Battles. That is to say, Pokémon not at Level 50 are made to be Level 50: stats and EV growths will be adjusted appropriately. (Moves remain unchanged.)

  • Legendary Pokémon: Most mainstream Legendary Pokémon are not allowed: this means you cannot use Mew, Mewtwo, Ho-oh, Lugia, Celebi, Kyogre, Groudon, Rayquaza, Jirachi, Deoxys, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Darkrai, Cresselia (?), Heatran, Phione, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyurem, Meloetta, Genesect, Xerneas, Yveltal, and Zygarde.

  • Pseudo-Legendaries: These Pokémon are allowed, per tradition: this means Articuno, Moltres, Zapdos, Entei, Suicune, Raikou, Latias, Latios, Regice, Regirock, Registeel, Rotom, Mesprit, Uxie, Azelf, Regigigas (?), Cobalion, Terrakion, Virizion, Thundurus, Tornadus, Landorus, and Keldeo are allowed to battle. Not sure how they're really distinct, but I use them quite heavily. ;)

  • Duplication: Hold items (beyond having no items) and Pokémon species may not be repeated.

  • Quantities: For Single Battles, you need three Pokémon; for Double and Rotation, you need four; and for Triple, you need six. If you use Multi Battles (you and someone against two others; the other may be human or AI), you only need two, but the battle format will be Double Battle.

After each battle win, you'll earn some BP. BP is used to buy items at the exchange in the entrance of the Maison. The BP earned will increase significantly as time goes on.

For the most part, Trainers in the Battle Maison are completely random, except at the 20- and 50-win marks, as described below. (Each special trainer is unique to a certain battle type.) Due to this chaotic nature, you will definitely want to construct a team well-fitted to fight any type of Pokémon. Pokémon with huge move varities, such as Lapras or Blaziken or Lucario or Charizard or Noivern or Dragonite, will be absolutely key to your survival. Hopefully you've gathered enough TMs/HMs throughout the Kalos region to modify some Pokémon to your needs.

During your challenge, you are allowed to interrupt it or save. Interrupting your challenge, unlike previous generations, is okay: now, since it's just a single straight grind until you lose, it allows you to take breaks to do Wi-Fi battles or whatever. It's a notable feature to series veterans ... and a welcome one! Your streak will end, however, if you lose a battle or opt to change battle types.

I believe that deals with the basics.




Battle Maison: BP Exchange



BATTLE MAISON BP EXCHANGE - LEFT (ITEMS)
Item Name Cost Effect
Ability Capsule 200 BP Switches a Pokémon's two abilities (if it has two)
Absorb Bulb 32 BP If the holder is hit by a Water-type move, Special Attack goes up
Air Balloon 48 BP Makes the Pokémon immune to Ground-type moves until hit (which destroys the item)
Assault Vest 48 BP Raises Special Defense, but prevents status moves from being used
BrightPowder 48 BP Lowers the foes' accuracy
Calcium 2 BP Increases Special Attack EVs by 10 (up to 100 Special Attack or 510 overall)
Carbos 2 BP Increases Speed EVs by 10 (up to 100 Speed or 510 overall)
Cell Battery 32 BP If the holder is hit with an Electric-type move, its Attack rises
Choice Band 48 BP Increases Attack, but only allows one move to be used
Choice Specs 48 BP Raises Special Attack, but only allows one move to be used
Dubious Disc 32 BP Evolves Porygon2 into Porygon-Z when held during a trade
Electirizer 32 BP Evolves Electabuzz into Electivire when helding during a trade
Eject Button 32 BP If the holder is attacked, it switches with another Pokémon in your party
Flame Orb 16 BP Burns the holder: best used with moves (i.e. Fling) that make the opponent hold it
Focus Band 48 BP The holder may survive an attack that would otherwise KO it; it will have just 1 HP
Focus Sash 48 BP If at full HP, the holder cannot be KO'ed in one hit - it will survive with at least 1 HP left
HP Up 2 BP Increases HP EVs by 10 (up to 100 HP or 510 overall)
Iron 2 BP Increases Defense EVs by 10 (up to 100 Defense or 510 overall)
Iron Ball 48 BP Lowers Speed and negated Flying-type and Levitate designations: use moves like Fling to give it to the enemy
Life Orb 48 BP The power of moves is increased, but the holder also loses HP with each move
Magmarizer 32 BP Evolves Magmar into Magmortar when held during a trade
Muscle Band 48 BP Increases the power of Physical-class moves
Power Anklet 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Speed while lowering Speed in battle
Power Band 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Special Defense while lowering Speed in battle
Power Belt 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Defense while lowering Speed in battle
Power Bracer 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Attack while lowering Speed in battle
Power Herb 32 BP Lets a move that needs to charge (e.g. Focus Punch, SolarBeam) be used immediately, but lowers the user's Happiness
Power Lens 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Special Attack while lowering Speed in battle
Power Weight 16 BP Doubles EV growth in Max HP while lowering Speed in battle
Protector 32 BP Evolves Rhydon into Rhyperior when held during a trade
Protein 2 BP Increases Attack EVs by 10 (up to 100 Attack or 510 overall)
Rare Candy 48 BP Causes an instant level-up, if the Pokémon is under Level 100. (It's most effective, EXP.-wise, just after a level-up.)
Razor Claw 48 BP Increases the critical-hit ratio of moves; evolves Sneasel into Weavile if held while leveling-up at night.
Razor Fang 48 BP Makes hit enemies flinch; evolves Gligar into Gliscor if held while leveling-up at night.
Reaper Cloth 32 BP Evolves Dusclops into Dusknoir when held during a trade.
Red Card 32 BP If the holder is hit by an enemy, the foe is removed from battle - this will end wild encounters
Ring Target 32 BP Moves that normally do nothing will now hit - use moves like Fling to give this to the enemy
Sachet 32 BP Evolves Spritzee into Aromatisse when held during a trade
Safety Goggles 48 BP The holder will not be affected by Hail, Sandstorm, or the various Powders
Scope Lens 48 BP Increases the holder's critical-hit ratio
Toxic Orb 16 BP Badly Poisons the holder: use moves like Fling to give it to foes, or have an ally with the Poison Heal ability hold it for HP healing
Up-Grade 32 BP Evolves Porygon into Porygon2 if held during a trade
Weakness Policy 32 BP If the holder is hit supereffectively, then its Attack and Special Attack both rise sharply
Whipped Dream 32 BP Evolves Swirlix into Slurpuff if held during a trade
White Herb 32 BP Reverts lowered stats, but lowers Happiness - hold to use automatically
Wide Lens 48 BP Raises the accuracy of moves
Zinc 2 BP Increases Special Defense EVs by 10 (up to 100 Special Defense or 510 overall)
Zoom Lens 48 BP If the holder moves after the Pokémon it wants to hit, its accuracy is boosted

BATTLE MAISON BP EXCHANGE - RIGHT (TMS)
Item Name Cost Move Type Move Class Max PPPower Accuracy Target(s)Notes
Dream Eater (TM85) 48 BP Psychic Special 15 100 100 One Absorbs HP; only works on Sleeping targets
Explosion (TM64) 48 BP Normal Physical 5 250 100 Not User User will faint
Incinerate (TM59) 16 BP Fire Special 15 30 100 One If target holds a Berry, it is destroyed
Quash (TM60) 24 BP Dark Status 15 --- 100 One User makes target go last
Retaliate (TM67) 48 BP Normal Physical 5 70 100 One More powerful if ally fainted last turn
Roar (TM05) 24 BP Normal Status 20 --- --- One Forces switch (ends wild battles)
Round (TM48) 16 BP Normal Special 15 60 100 One Stronger if allies use Round, too
Sludge Wave (TM34) 32 BP Poison Special 10 95 100 Not User May cause Poison
Smack Down (TM23) 32 BP Rock Physical 15 50 100 One Removes Flying-type designation
Steel Wing (TM51) 32 BP Steel Physical 25 70 90 One May raise the user's Special Defense
Swagger (TM87) 24 BP Normal Status 15 --- 90 One Confuses a target, but raises Attack sharply
Volt Switch (TM72) 48 BP Electric Special 20 70 100 One User will switch out



Battle Maison: Special Battles: 20-Win Streak



SINGLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Nita

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Wigglytuff Normal/Fairy Level 50 N/A
Grumpig Psychic Level 50 N/A
Purugly Normal Level 50 N/A

  • Wigglytuff: Wigglytuff will be weak to Poison and Steel, with immunities to Ghost and Dragon. It has advantages over Dark, Dragon, and Fighting.

  • Grumpig: Grumpig is weak to Dark, Bug, and Ghost, with advantageous over Fighting and Poison accompanying it.

  • Purugly: This ugly feller is weak to Fighting and immune to Ghost. It has no type-based advantages, and doesn't really specialize in its moveset.


DOUBLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Evelyn

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Primeape Fighting Level 50 N/A
Lumineon Water Level 50 N/A
Pachirisu Electric Level 50 N/A
Persian Normal Level 50 N/A

  • Primeape: This feisty Pokémon is weak to Psychic, Fairy, and Flying, with advantages over Normal, Ice, Rock, Steel, and Dark.

  • Lumineon: This Pokémon will be weak to Grass and Electric, with advantages over Fire, Rock, and Ground.

  • Pachirisu: Pachirisu is weak to Ground and advantageous over Flying and Water.

  • Persian: Finally, this cat Pokémon is weak to Fighting, immune to Ghost, and lacks true special note in its moveset.


TRIPLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Dana

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Dragalge Dragon/Poison Level 50 N/A
Whimsicott Grass/Fairy Level 50 N/A
Piloswine Ground/Ice Level 50 N/A
Magcargo Fire/Rock Level 50 N/A
Magneton Steel/Electric Level 50 N/A
Girafarig Normal/Psychic Level 50 N/A

  • Dragalge: This Pokémon will be weak to Dragon, Ice, Psychic, and Ground, with advantages over Dragon and Grass being its main features. Beware of contact moves on both sides because of the potential Poison Point/Poison Touch abilities.

  • Whimsicott: This Pokémon is doubly-weak to Poison, weak to Fire, Ice, Flying, and Steel, and immune to Ground. It is advantageous over Dragon, Dark, Fighting, Water, Rock, and Ground.

  • Piloswine: This mammoth is weak to Fire, Water, Grass, Ice, and Steel, and is immune to Electric. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Steel, Electric, Poison, Flying, Grass, and Ground.

  • Magcargo: This hot snail is doubly-weak to Water and Ground, and weak to Fighting, Rock, and Steel. It has advantages over Fire, Flying, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Grass. Beware of contact moves, as you may sustain a burn.

  • Magneton: This attractive Pokémon is doubly weak to Ground, weak to Fire and Fighting, and immune to Poison. It is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Flying, and Water.

  • Girafarig: Finally, we come to Girafarig, who is weak only to Bug and Dark, with an immunity to Ghost to boot. It is advantageous primarily over Fighting and Poison.


ROTATION BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Morgan

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Sawsbuck Normal/Grass Level 50 N/A
Swalot Poison Level 50 N/A
Klefki Steel/Fairy Level 50 N/A
Mantine Water/Flying Level 50 N/A

  • Sawsbuck: The seasonal Pokémon from Generation V (along with Deerling), Sawsback is weak to Fighting, Fire, Ice, Flying, Bug, and Poison, with an immunity to Ghost. It is advantageous over Water, Rock, and Ground. It could have the Sap Sipper ability, negating Grass-type moves. (As if you should even use them here.)

  • Swalot: This big eater will be weak to Psychic and Ground, and advantageous over Fairy and Grass.

  • Klefki: This guy is weak to Fire and Ground, and is immune to Poison and Dragon. It also is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Fairy, Fighting, Dark, and Dragon.

  • Mantine: Mantine will be doubly-weak to Electric and normally weak to Rock. It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Ground, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.




Battle Maison: Super Battles: 50-Win Streak



SINGLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Nita

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Landorus Ground/Flying Level 50 N/A
Thundurus Electric/Flying Level 50 N/A
Tornadus Flying Level 50 N/A

  • Landorus: We will be fighting against the Therian trio from Pokémon Black/White, although they're not in their Therian Formes. Landorus is definitely the rarest of the three as well, requiring a trade from the opposite version with the legendary coming. Gah... Anyways, this particular Pokémon is doubly-weak to Ice and weak to Water. It is also immune to Ground and Electric. (I like that irony. =P) It is advantageous over Fire, Rock, Electric, Steel, Poison, Bug, Grass, and Fighting. Try not to start Sandstorms around this guy: it only triggers beneficial abilities for 'im.

  • Thundurus: This Therian, the Pokémon White member of the trio, is weak to Rock and Ice, and immune to Ground. It has advantages over Water, Flying, Grass, Bug, and Fighting.

  • Tornadus: Finally, we round out with Tornadus, the Pokémon Black member of the trio and the only pure-Flying type Pokémon as-of-yet (excluding Arceus with the Sky Plate). It is thusly weak to Ice, Rock, and Electric, immune to Ground, and advantageous over Bug, Grass, and Fighting.


DOUBLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Evelyn

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Suicune Water Level 50 N/A
Raikou Electric Level 50 N/A
Entei Fire Level 50 N/A
Latios Psychic/Dragon Level 50 N/A

  • Suicune: The first three members of Evelyn's team are the legendary beast Pokémon from Pokémon Gold/Silver/Crystal and HeartGold/SoulSilver, with numerous reappearances in other games, most of the time based on which starter you picked. (Sound familiar?) Additionally, Pokémon Crystal (and parts of the HG/SS plot) honed in rather specifically on Suicune rather than Ho-oh/Lugia. Anyways, this member of the trio is weak to Grass and Electric, and advantageous over Fire, Rock, and Ground. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could use Water Absorb to absorb Water-type moves, so beware.

  • Raikou: Shockingly enough, Raikou is weak only to Ground, and has advantages over Flying and Water. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could use Volt Absorb to absorb Electric-type moves, so beware.

  • Entei: Entei will be weak to Rock, Ground, and Water, with advantages over Grass, Bug, Ice, and Steel. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could use Flash Fire to absorb Fire-type moves, so beware.

  • Latios: Latios is one of two members of a mostly version-exclusive trio found in Ruby/Sapphire (this one being Ruby's), although the two reappeared in Black/White Versions 2. Like the other member of the Lati duo, he is weak to Dragon, Ice, Fairy, Dark, Bug, and Ghost, and advantageous over Dragon, Poison, and Fighting. Due to the Levitate ability, this Pokémon is also immune to Ground.


TRIPLE BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Dana

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Articuno Ice/Flying Level 50 N/A
Moltres Fire/Flying Level 50 N/A
Zapdos Electric/Flying Level 50 N/A
Regice Ice Level 50 N/A
Regirock Rock Level 50 N/A
Registeel Steel Level 50 N/A

  • Articuno: The first three members of Dana's team are the trio of legendary birds (from Generation I) - typically all available at once, with some of the more recent games (such as X/Y) we found them to be based on your starters. Anyways, Articuno is doubly weak to Rock, and weak to Fire, Ice, Electric, and Steel. It is immune to Ground, and has advantages over Ground, Grass, Flying, Bug, and Fighting. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could have Snow Cloak to raise evasion when Hailing: just saying...

  • Moltres: The hot-head, Moltres is doubly weak to Rock and weak to Water and Electric. It immune to Ground and is advantageous over Grass, Ice, Bug, Steel, and Fighting. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could have Flame Body to make contact attackers get burned: just saying...

  • Zapdos: Zapdos rounds out the trio and is weak to Rock and Ice with an immunity to Ground. It is advantageous over Water, Flying, Grass, Bug, and Fighting. There is an off-chance that this Pokémon could have Lightningrod to nullify all Electric attacks on the field: just saying...

  • Regice: The next three members of Dana's team are the original Regi trio from Pokémon Ruby/Sapphire, some of the most painful legendaries in history to ever get because you needed to be able to read Braille superimposed on the screen. x_x They later got accompanied by Regigigas in Generation IV if you had the other three. In any case, Regice is weak to Fire, Rock, and Steel, and advantageous over Flying, Grass, and Ground. This Pokémon probably will have Clear Body as an ability, so don't bother lowering it stats.

  • Regirock: Another Regi, Regirock is weak to Fighting, Ground, Grass, Water, and Steel. It is advantageous over Flying, Fire, Ice, and Bug. This Pokémon probably will have Clear Body as an ability, so don't bother lowering it stats.

  • Registeel: The most defensively apt Regi, Registeel is weak to Fire, Fighting, and Ground, and advantageous over Rock, Ice, and Fairy. This Pokémon probably will have Clear Body as an ability, so don't bother lowering it stats.


ROTATION BATTLE BOSS: Battle Chatelaine Morgan

Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Level Conditions
Cobalion Steel/Fighting Level 50 N/A
Virizion Grass/Fighting Level 50 N/A
Terrakion Rock/Fighting Level 50 N/A
Latias Dragon/Psychic Level 50 N/A

  • Cobalion: Finally, we come to Morgan's Pokémon, the first three of which are the Musketeer trio from Generation V, representing justice. (And, yes, "Musketeer" can reference the French, the country upon which Kalos is based. And, yes, Keldeo is the D'Artagnan of this group, unfeatured here, being the fourth unofficial member.) Cobalion is weak to Fire, Ground, and Fighting, and is advantageous over Rock, Ice, Fairy, Normal, Steel, and Dark. Don't hit it with Dark-type moves or you'll boost its Attack!

  • Virizion: The grass Pokémon of the trio, featured prominently in Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity, Virizion is also the most prone to weakness. It is doubly-weak to Flying, and weak to Fire, Ice, Poison, Psychic, and Fairy. It is advantageous over Water, Rock, Ground, Steel, Normal, Dark, and Ice. Don't hit it with Dark-type moves or you'll boost its Attack!

  • Terrakion: Rounding out the main three of the Musketeer trio, Terrakion is weak to Water, Grass, Fighting, Ground, Psychic, Steel, and Fairy. It has advantages over Flying, Fire, Ice, Bug, Normal, Rock, Steel, and Dark. Don't hit it with Dark-type moves or you'll boost its Attack!

  • Latias: Rounding out the Lati duo mentioned with Evelyn, Latias is subject to the same details. She is weak to Dragon, Ice, Fairy, Dark, Bug, and Ghost, and advantageous over Dragon, Poison, and Fighting. Due to the Levitate ability, this Pokémon is also immune to Ground.



Battle Institute

^sr36|

The Battle Institute is a facility in Lumiose City that, like the Battle Maison, will be opened up after the Elite Four is beaten. It parallels the one in previous games. The purpose of this building is to test yourself against a variety of Trainers - many much harder than those you'd find in normal in-game play, exhibitng tactics you'd see more commonly in online and official competitions. Strategy becomes much more important here than probably any area of the in-game experience.

Firstly, there are restrictions on the battles paralleling those of the Battle Maison and general competitions.


  • Flat Battles: All battles will be Flat Battles. That is to say, Pokémon above Level 50 are made to be Level 50: stats and EV growths will be adjusted appropriately. (Moves remain unchanged.)

  • Legendary Pokémon: Most mainstream Legendary Pokémon are not allowed: this means you cannot use Mew, Mewtwo, Ho-oh, Lugia, Celebi, Kyogre, Groudon, Rayquaza, Jirachi, Deoxys, Dialga, Palkia, Giratina, Darkrai, Cresselia (?), Heatran, Phione, Manaphy, Shaymin, Arceus, Victini, Reshiram, Zekrom, Kyurem, Meloetta, Genesect, Xerneas, Yveltal, and Zygarde.

  • Pseudo-Legendaries: These Pokémon are allowed, per tradition: this means Articuno, Moltres, Zapdos, Entei, Suicune, Raikou, Latias, Latios, Regice, Regirock, Registeel, Rotom, Mesprit, Uxie, Azelf, Regigigas (?), Cobalion, Terrakion, Virizion, Thundurus, Tornadus, Landorus, and Keldeo are allowed to battle. Not sure how they're really distinct, but I use them quite heavily. ;)

  • Duplication: Hold items (beyond having no items) and Pokémon species may not be repeated.

  • Quantities: For Single Battles, you need three Pokémon. For Double Battles, you use four.

Once you've spoken with the receptionist in the front of the area, between the PC and record-tracking machine, you can choose your team. You will successively fight five Trainers - winning or losing is somewhat irrelevant. You will continue on to the next battle, but your score is mostly based on how many Pokémon you beat, how many of your Pokémon were beaten, how easily you won, how well you counteracted their tactics, and so on and so forth. After having finished, you'll receive a certificate, naming your rank, test type, and score. The scores are below:

Battle Test Rank Number of Stars Point Range
Beginning Rank 1 0 - 999
Novice Rank 2 1,000 - 1,999
Normal Rank 3 2,000 - 2,999
Super Rank 4 3,000 - 3,999
Hyper Rank 5 4,000 - 4,999
Elite Rank 6 5,000 - 5,999
Master Rank 7 6,000+

Additionally, you will receive items and BP for winning.


Now that we've discussed the Battle Institute, you have to wonder what a good team consists of, for both these Tests and competition. So here's KeyBlade999's quickie-guide to a great Pokémon team:

  • Type Coverage: This is probably the second-most important thing to consider: it's an elementary concept, but worth consideration even here. Firstly, it does not - and to you, should never - connote itself to simply the Pokémon's own types: while those give a general indication of the moves a Pokémon can have, it's far from all. For example, my Blaziken has Shadow Claw (Ghost), SolarBeam (Grass), Stone Edge (Rock), and Poison Jab (Poison). Because of those four moves, my Blaziken will literally be able to cover every single Pokémon that could give him type-based advantage problems (plus myriad others), despite none of those actually gaining the same-type attack bonus (STAB), which allows it to boost damage by 50%. Face it: a supereffective move (x2) is better than a simple STAB move (x1.5) on a general level. Sure, the two often coincide (x3), but...

  • Maxed IVs: An extremely hard, and mostly optional find, but well worth it in the long run.

  • EVs: This mostly depends on the base stats of your Pokémon and how you plan to grow them. For example, if you want to make them use only Special moves, get 252 Special Attack EVs; if they're an absolute tank already, further that with HP/Defense/Special Defense EVs; if you want a varied type sweeper, round out everything at 84 or 88 EVs.

  • Overall Team Cooperation:
    • By far the most in-depth and most important characteristic of battle... Perhaps you feel like playing Double or Triple Battles, or maybe you want your Pokémon in Single Battles to help the team out long term. Then a key thing to consider is how well they mesh together: it's not an easy concept for beginners to grasp as easily as type coverage, or even EVs or IVs. This is because it often involves the hidden effects of moves and research into Abilities, and deep, deep thereotical simulation. For example, one weird team I theorized was one of six Lapras. Sounds like there's a problem, right? I mean, if you have a Grass or Electric type, just to start, I've screwed myself. But that also allows for six different movesets. For example, here's a Triple Battle team I plan to import from Generation V when PokéBank comes out in December... (It's only meant to explemify my point: it doesn't work in the Institute due to the no-duplication clause.)
      • Lapras #1: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Hail
      • Lapras #2: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Dragon Pulse
      • Lapras #3: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Ancient Power
      • Lapras #4: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Thunderbolt
      • Lapras #5: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Toxic
      • Lapras #6: Surf, Blizzard, Psychic, Toxic
    • So, you see, there's a slight problem: hellish lack of move variety, and six Pokémon of the same species being used to boot, making them all weak to same things with limited type coverage. Aha, but let's consider that Lapras can have the Water Absorb ability. With excessively tedious breeding and EV/IV-training, I could have six Lapras, with 31 Special Attack IVs and 252 Special Attack EVs and the proper Nature - an extra 103 points in Special Attack. Plus, I'd probably divide the rest of the EVs to Defense, HP, and Special Defense to make Lapras, already a tank in his own right, sturdier.
    • Now, since Water Absorb is their ability, if I need to heal in an online (i.e. no item) battle, I can use Surf three times to heal myself, because healing is usually disallowed if not caused by moves! (Remember, Surf hits all adjacent targets, except the user.) Conjoin that with 1/16-max HP healing with Leftovers and you have some friggin' tanks. And if I feel like battling and not toying with people? Hail is intended to always be in effect to make sure that everyone's Blizzard (best on Flying, Grass, Dragon, Ground) always hits, plus to hit my opponent's Pokémon a lot. (It's 165 Power due to STAB, times three uses, equals 495. Add in a weakness and it's 990. If it's a double weakness, it is 1,970. If you opt for the Never-Melt Ice on all three, it's 2,364.) Thunderbolt is used for Water and Flying, Dragon Pulse for Dragon, and Ancient Power for pointless stat-boosting and use on Fire, Flying, Ice, and Bug. Toxic is also there for troublesome tank Pokémon, and Psychic for Fighting and Poison. The only remaining weakness is Electric, which Blizzard or Psychic can normally take care of anyways without being super-effective (preferably the former, due to STAB).
    • There is an additional advantage earned by this team. Because of the superficial homogeny (unless I use only some Shinies - none of mine were), the opponent never knows what's coming if I switch out Pokémon. Perhaps I could bring out someone to be counteracting his Zapdos? Perhaps his Dragonite? Perhaps his Machamp? Heck if he knows - it'll be too late when he learns.
    • So, that's one team. I will not discuss every possible team here, because there's just far too many to count. Synergy among your Pokémon is extremely important in official competition, especially with Double and Triple Battles. You always want someone to be able to cover another's tail if they can't cover it completely, and you always want some way to be able to give your Pokémon that are losing a leg up in some way (like Water Absorb and Surf). No team will be perfect - trust me, I could probably pick a hole in most any strategy, because any strategy will fail under the reasoning of "ideal circumstances". God forbid someone gets a team with three maxed-Speed Jolteon using Discharge on my Lapras team, right? But if it's your team -- one you construct, one you know, and one you love -- that's perfect enough right there. =D


Shinies, Chain Fishing, & The PokéRadar

NOTE

This whole section is rather preliminary in that its mechanics are still strongly unknown and often just theorized upon. Additional mechanics, or tips for chaining either way, are strongly welcomed - just send me a line, as it were, through the Legalities section!


~ The Concept of Shinies ~

Your first question is probably what a "shiny" even is. A Shiny is a special type of Pokémon. Most prominent is its coloration, which is generally quite different from a normal Pokémon's. For example, a normal Pikachu is yellow; a Shiny Pikachu is more orange-gold in coloration. A normal Rayquaza is green, whereas a Shiny Rayquaza is a cool jet-black. And so on and so forth. What makes a Pokémon shiny? Nowadays, it's a shot against the RNG. In Generations II-IV, the odds were 6 in 65,536 (often rounded to 1 in 8,192). From Black/White on to X/Y, it has now become 12 in 65,536 (1 in 4,096). The Shiny Charm in the game is able to triple these (18/65,536 and 36/65,536), and using the Masuda Method of Pokémon Breeding also changes it by about 6 times as far as I know (36 or 72 in 65,536). Combined, these two methods will allow you to go as high as 108 or 216 in 65,536. Then there's the PokéRadar in Generations IV and VI that could bring it to 240 or 480 in 65,536. Just some fun facts.

Despite the lack of difference other than in coloration, they're quite prized - in Pokémon Black/White 2, a rare medal was even allowed for finding one. In some games, finding Shiny Pokémon was allowed permanently on certain occasions - for example, the Shiny Gyarados at the Lake of Rage in Generation II and HeartGold/SoulSilver, or the Shiny Haxorus in the Nature Preserve of Black/White 2. Sometimes Nintendo even distributes special Shiny Pokémon, like the Shiny Pichu for the Spiky-Eared Pichu event in HG/SS.

But, pretty much most of the rest of the time, you'll find Pokémon that are just otherwise random. The odds of finding a Shiny Pokémon are pretty low. Specifically, the odds are 12 in 65,536 (baselined, anyhow) in this game. Mostly, for some reason, the odds are rounded rather significantly: not to 1 in 5,000, but 1 in 4,096 for reasons I do not fathom. Whatever the case, those odds equal approximately 0.0244%. So, yeah, they're rare.

In some generations, methods have been given to allow Shinies to become more prominent: after all, they're not significant statistically, just in coloration, but more people want them. Some methods, such as Masuda method, have arisen. From what I understand, it's a breeding concept. The general idea is that breeding Pokémon from other countries is supposed to raise the chance of finding a Shiny - with the Wonder Trade function in X/Y, that becomes very significant! Additionally, in Black/White 2, you could complete the National Pokédex for the Shiny Charm, which tripled the Shiny-finding rate. It's not a lot, but, heck, 3 for 1,000 hours of gameplay is significant enough for some. =P I've personally theorized this to be a possible award - after all, we get the Oval Charm in this game for finishing the Kalos Pokédex, a parallel of the Oval Charm award for finishing the Unova Pokédex in Black/White 2. Of course, without PokéBank in December 2013, this is purely theoretical.

But one of the more prominent methods - and most successful - took place in Generation IV. I have had friends claim up to hundreds of Shinies (oddly Mareeps) through this method: PokéRadar chaining. In Diamond/Pearl/Platinum, you could get make Shinies forty times more common by simply finding the same Pokémon again and again through the PokéRadar. The PokéRadar makes its appearance again here, along with a similar method of Chain Fishing. Both are to be discussed below.



~ Preparations ~

There are a number of things you'll probably want. First and foremost, if you're going to use the PokéRadar, you can get it from Sycamore's lab after the Elite Four are beaten. If you want to do it with Chain Fishing, you'll need some kind of Fishing Rod - preferably Super, but Good and Old are also okay I suppose.

As far as Pokéballs go? I recommend the Dusk Ball or the Quick Ball. If you're playing at night, the Dusk Ball is always a quadrupled catch rate, whereas the Quick Ball only applies to the first four turns. Similarly, you could use the Repeat Ball if it's a previously-owned species, or a Net Ball for Water/Bug Pokémon. Chain Fishers will also appreciate the Dive Ball. So, basically, if it gets a catch rate above x2.0, jump on it.

If you're planning on going for higher-level Pokémon, you need some other plans - most of those named above tend to fail on Pokémon at full health at Level 30+. False Swipe is an absolute must - be sure someone knows it as it can reduce Pokémon to 1 HP without KO'ing them. EVER. It kinda sucks on Ghost-types, though. >_> You'll also want someone to be able to use some kind of non-damaging status move. If you feel confident, use Sleep Powder, Hypnosis, or the like: it doubles the catch rate, but is temporal. Thunder Wave, Stun Spore, and the like provide the usually-permanent Paralysis, but it's a x1.5 catch rate, 75% as effective as Sleep (and Frozen, but Frozen isn't induced without damage). Basically status the Pokémon immediately, use False Swipe a bunch, reapply the status if it was Sleep, then throw a Pokéball.



~ PokéRadar & Chaining ~

First, we shall discuss the PokéRadar. To use the PokéRadar, first simply use it in the field. Specifically, you must use it in tall grass without being in the skates or on the bike. Once used, several bushes of grass will shake: those mark places where Pokémon are likely to be. (Sometimes they shake for no reason. >_<) Go there and you will find a Pokémon. Battle it and then ya go.

Bushes will shake after the battle: go into one of them for another battle. If this Pokémon is the same species - that's all that matters - as the one before, you've begun to "chain", and thusly increase the chances of finding Shiny Pokémon. There is a peculiar mechanic about which bush to choose I'll explain momentarily. Anyways, note that encountering Pokémon before getting to a shaking bush will break the chaining sequence, so look out! Similarly, finding an empty bush or encountering Pokémon of a different species breaks the chain, but those are down to pure chance. Because of your desire for exactitude (and diagonal moving really being screwed up in regards to encounter rates), I strongly recommend the use of the D-Pad.

Now, that bush mechanic? As anyone ever using the PokéRadar knows (Gen. IV or Gen. VI), multiple bushes shake. So, question is, which to choose? As a rule of thumb, the farthest is best - that's not exactly true, but it works well if you're having trouble spotting the bushes shaking. From experimentation (confirmed by me and Ratleh insofar), the fourth "ring" of bushes works best - in other words, look below.

^l42|"U" is you, and each color and number denote another "ring".

Now, looking at the above diagram, you can see that the fourth ring is those four steps away from you if you go straight or straight-diagonally, and any tile on that square. While there is no hard evidence that really supports this part of the theory, it seems to work well enough for me, so it may be coincidence, or something with the next concept. As well as aiming for the fourth ring of grass, you want to aim for the fastest-shaking grass possible - that takes rather keen observation in that you have to see every bush shake. In my experience, the furthest grass did shake fastest, so that's another rule of thumb to try using if you're having trouble with it. And, finally, try to avoid two adjacent things of shaking grass - generally, it ends up empty or an alternate species, breaking your chain.

So, in summation for this current "grass rings" theory: aim for the fourth grass ring and use the fastest-shaking ring of grass, but avoid adjacent groups of shaking grass. This has been pretty successful for me, which is why I bother to put it in: in about an hour, with around a 35-Poké chain, I did manage to find a Shiny Pidgey on ... Route 2, I think it was.

The PokéRadar itself is battery-powered. To charge it, you need to walk (or bike or skate) a number of steps in the field to get it back up to 100% - 100 steps is all that's needed. Good luck finding some Shinies - I found a Shiny Fletchling in Santalune Forest after about a twenty-five long chain when I first implemented this section! And, no, you can't have it. =P



~ Consecutive Fishing ~

Consecutive Fishing is the simpler and earlier available of the two Shiny-catching methods. It works on a similar premise: when fishing, if you keep encountering the same species, one after another after another, you'll raise the chances of finding a Shiny Pokémon! Obviously, that would imply the use of the Old Rod, since you usually only can find one Pokémon species (Magikarp or Luvdisc, if I remember correctly for X/Y) on them. Then again, you might prefer to actually have a Shiny Starmie, wouldn't you?

Anyways, that's the premise. To fish, face any body of water you could normally Surf on and use the Rod. Wait for some "!" or "!!" to appear and quickly press the A Button to start a battle. Then repeat as needed.

Again, Consecutive Fishing relies on a chain similar to the PokéRadar. To break the chain, the following can occur:


  • Encountering a different Pokémon species.
  • Not getting a bite on the line and having to recast it.
  • Moving from that spot whatsoever.
  • Pressing the A Button too early or too late.
  • Switching rods? This is theorized, but untested - it usually changes the species anyways, per the first thing listed here.

After a while, I did manage to hook a Shiny Gyarados on Route 3 after about forty previous ones hooked. Ah, Gen. II nostalgia...


Berry Harvesting



Sectional Flowchart



First and foremost, if you're looking just for Berry effects, see the Berries section of the [[Item Listings]].




Berry Harvesting: The Basics



^sr37|

People having played most of the GBA and DS Pokémon games (Black/White excluded) probably recall an interesting little quest about growing Berries... Okay, fine, it wasn't even remotely interesting, and easy enough to skip since it had little relevance on gameplay. While the Berries still have little true hold here, stuff like the Lumiose Juice Shoppe make growing and harvesting Berries all the more valuable. Add that in with the additional aspects added in with it and you'll have yourself something to at least think about doing.

The Berry Fields are only found in one place, off of [[Route 7]] to the south. There, you'll be told about the Berry fields and stuff. There are 36 plots of loamy soil here for you to grow Berry trees on. The Berries grown must come from you in some way - there are some trees throughout Kalos, some Berries are given to you, and you can of course grow them yourself!

Berry growth begins with planting. To plant a Berry, simply examine one of the empty lumps of dirt and select a Berry to plant. You should water it with the Sprinklotad you'll also be given, as plants need water for photosynthesis. From there, for the most part, you have to do almost no work if you don't want to - like in previous games. However, if you want to harvest better crops - and you will want to - you need to consider some other things. (For the record, bad crops usually hold 0 to 3 Berries, whereas well-managed ones have yielded 10 ~ 15 for me per Berry planted.)

Plants get weeds around them. It's a known fact, and weeds suck up nutrients. While there's no major consequence to this, it does make the harvests less plentiful and you'll get fewer Berries. Simply examine them and pull up the weeds to get rid of the nuisance. Problem solved with high maintenance, if you deem it needed. Bugs also are a problem. While you won't have vast swarms of locusts or cicadas coming around (awww...), you will have a few species of Bug-typed Pokémon to deal with. You'll basically have to battle them for your plants back.

Finally, fertilizer. While we won't outright go to the -- ah, I'd rather let this guide be more tasteful than that. >_> Anyways, we'll be getting our mulch from the same source as our plants: in the northwest and southeast corners of the Berry farm, you will find composters into which you can fit three Berries to make mulch in. Mulch can help plants grow, among ... other things...

That's the basics of Berry growth.




Berry Harvesting: Mulch



Perhaps we should discuss mulch in better detail? As you probably know, mulch can be made in the composters in the northwest and southeast corners of the field: toss in three Berries and you'll get three units of some type of mulch. If you spread it around the Berry plots, you can get a number of changes. For now, I only know of three types of mulch: if you have more, send it to me through the Legalities section!

Type of Mulch Berry Combinations Effects of Mulch
Boost Mulch Two same-colored Berries + one different-colored one Lessens the amount of watering needed
Rich Mulch Three Berries of different colors Lessens the amount of general care needed
Surprise Mulch Three Berries of the same color Increases the chance of Berry mutations...

For the record, if you're having trouble discerning Berry color (red, blue, yellow, green, pink, and purple being the ones the game considers), you can just use Berries of the same species in the case of the Boost/Surprise Mulch - for example, three Oran Berries still yields Surprise Mulch. If you plan to do this, though, I recommend devoting two or three other plots for that same Berry each time, so you can continue to have plenty.



Berry Harvesting: Mutation



Hopefully by now, most of you are familiar with the reproductive aspects of hybridization and cross-pollination. If not, the brief lesson is this. If you plant two plants of different appearances - or even species - next to each other, they may pollinate and produce a plant. This child plant can be one of a whole new species, or have intermediate characteristics of the parents, or use the dominant genotypes in their DNA. Whatever the case, the odds that they'll be the same is highly unlikely.

In Berries, a similar concept takes place. When you plant two Berries of different species next to each other, you may find additional Berries species among each tree's harvest. It's simple enough to understand, and is further aided by the Surprise Mulch. After getting mutation and trying to leave the area, a Scientist will come and take residence in the northeastern house - she can give you the mutation combos, if any have been forgotten or vague. (Since a Berry tree is surrounded by up to four others non-diagonally, you can see where that'd get problematic if the pollen spreads even further through wind or Bug Pokémon or the like.)

Anyways, let's firstly assume you want to optimize this normally trial-and-error process, as I have. Well, in that case, you need to fill in every other plot with a Berry of the same species: that means 18 Oran Berries, 18 Leppa Berries, or whatever. The remaining should be filled with differing species of Berries. A graphical representation:


^l38|Mutation optimization

So, for the known combos? Here are some below: if you have others to note, please send them in through the Legalities section. As a note, there are 67 species of Berries as of Generation VI - in theory, that means up to 4,422 possible mutations. Of course, there still would be 67 species, so we're saying like each Berry could have on average 66 mutation combos. If you've forgotten the Berry mutations you have found, again, a Scientist that appears in the northeastern house can help.

Berry Mutation Parent Berries
Apicot Berry Kelpsy Berry Wacan Berry
Ganlon Berry Qualot Berry Tanga Berry
Grepa Berry Aguav Berry Figy Berry
Hondew Berry Aspear Berry Leppa Berry
Kee Berry Ganlon Berry Liechi Berry
Kelpsy Berry Chesto Berry Persim Berry
Liechi Berry Hondew Berry Yache Berry
Maranga Berry Apicot Berry Petaya Berry
Petaya Berry Kasib Berry Pomeg Berry
Pomeg Berry Iapapa Berry Mago Berry
Qualot Berry Oran Berry Pecha Berry
Salac Berry Grepa Berry Roseli Berry
Tamato Berry Lum Berry Sitrus Berry



Berry Harvesting: Bug Pokémon Finds



LOCAL WILD POKÉMON ENCOUNTER DATA - BERRY FIELDS
Pokémon Species Pokémon Type Abilities EV YieldVersion
Burmy Bug Shed Skin, Overcoat 1 Sp.Def. Both
Combee Bug/Flying Honey Gather, Hustle 1 Speed Both
Illumise Bug Oblivious, Tinted Lens, Prankster 1 Speed Both
Ledyba Bug/Flying Early Bird, Swarm, Rattled 1 Sp.Def. Both
Spewpa Bug Shed Skin, Friend Guard 1 Defense Both
Volbeat Bug Illuminate, Swarm, Prankster 1 Speed Both

This section is mostly used just to describe that there are a number of Bug Pokémon you can find when growing Berries - they will be on shaking trees, simply examine them to find 'em. None of them are particularly noteworthy for actual use in the game, though, beyond Pokédex completion. (And, of course, that only female Combees evolve. And all Combees hold Honey.) As usual, if you know of other Pokémon, let me know through the Legalities section!


Lumiose Juice Shoppe

Detailing this almost as a sub-set of the Berry Harvesting sidequest, there is a particular bar on Autumnal Avenue in Lumiose City. There, in this Juice Shoppe, you can buy and make Berry juices. These are a fair bit different from the typical Berry Juice we saw in FireRed/LeafGreen that cameo'd numerous times later and healed only 20 HP. Rather, if you've played Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky, consider it more akin to Spinda's Juice Bar.

Firstly, there are three random drinks the man at the left side of the counter will sell, for varying and often expensive prices. They change on a daily basis and can do a number of things, including raising EVs and even -- *gasp* -- Level! O_O If you want to, you can make your own Berries with the man at the right. Depending on which two Berries you mix together, you can get a number of effects. However, this only is doable once per day.

Yes, that Berry Harvesting quest is looking ever more critical every day isn't it!?

Anyways, below are the known drinks and potential combos - some after buyable, so I don't yet have combinations for them. If you have any other known combos, please send me a line through the Legalities section!


Berry Shake Effects Known Combinations
Blue Juice Boosts Special Attack EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two blue Berries
Colorful Shake Raises Happiness Two differently-colored Berries
Green Juice Boosts Special Defense EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two green Berries
Perilous Soup Brings all EVs to zero Kee Berry + Maranga Berry
Pink Juice Boosts Speed EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two pink Berries
Purple Juice Boosts HP EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two purple Berries
Rare Soda Induces one to four level-ups! (Up to Level 100) Lansat Berry + Starf Berry
Red Juice Boosts Attack EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two red Berries
Ultra Rare Soda Induces five level-ups! (Up to Level 100) ?
Yellow Juice Boosts Defense EVs by 4~32, or Happiness if at 252 in stat or 510 overall Two yellow Berries


Friend Safari

FRIEND CODES

You will need to register people as Friends in your 3DS for this. Since it requires you to register them and them to register you, it's not going to be remotely reasonable for me to list codes here. In fact, it's not a good idea to simply register Friend Codes found on the message boards. I recommend creating a topic on the GameFAQs Pokémon X/Y trading boards and asking for some Friend Safari Friend Codes - these boards are very active and meet 100+ codes with regularity. That'll sate you, eh?

Also note that this requires a Wi-Fi Internet connection for your 3DS/2DS on both sides: it won't work until the Friendship is confirmed.


Most veterans of the Pokémon mainstream series (up to Generation IV) probably recall a particular place called the Safari Zone. It was a place wherein you could catch extremely rare Pokémon. While it often didn't violate version-exclusiveness, it nonetheless provided a wealth of useful Pokémon, and, in Red/Blue, you had to go there for an HM. =P Oddly skipped over in Generation V, the Safari Zone finally returns, but now with a forced-online mechanic and it's called the "Friend Safari".

It is not found until beating the game and visiting Kiloude City - it will be in the northeast corner of town. There, you can choose to go into a particular Safari Zone. However, this Safari Zone is not based on anything in-game - rather, it is based on Friend Codes. Accessible from the Home Menu in the orangish square, you can register Friend Codes through infrared communication or the Internet through the actual exchange of the numbers. (You get a Friend Code upon accessing the Internet.) Once you and your friend have each other registered on your systems, and the 3DS's/2DS's have connected to the Internet to confirm this, you should be allowed to enter a Friend Safari.

This Friend Safari will contain two or three Pokémon of a certain type. (The third is for when the other person also has beaten the Elite Four.) These Pokémon are special in that they are set with a fairly flat 33% encounter rate, and each Friend Code almost always provides a unique trio of Pokémon. The Friend Safari Pokémon are also very special in that, for one, they are more likely to have the "Hidden" abilities, which are rare and valuable, like a Moltres with Flash Fire. Additionally, all of the Pokémon seem to have two IVs equal to 31 - that means, in at least two stats, they will gain 31 points over their base values at Level 100! (Alternatively, the odds of finding a 6-perfect-IV Pokémon go from 1 in 2^30 (1,073,741,824) down to 1 in 2^20 (1,048,576), over 1,000 times more likely.) And, finally, the Pokémon typically fail to obey version-exclusivity, typically are not native to Kalos ... and can even be starter Pokémon!

This is all quite appetizing, eh? It gets better (for some). Firstly, unlike normal Safari Zones, you pay nothing and spend as long as you want (step- or time-wise) in there. Battles in the Friend Safari are that: battles; no more of this "stone, mud, Safari Ball" crap. Pokémon are found at exactly Level 30, and you battle them with normal Pokémon. Recommended capture tactics include a Quick Ball (or the more situational special balls) on the first turn. If that fails - it normally does - you can use the typical "False Swipe, Sleep/Paralysis, Pokéball" formula. Whatever the case, it makes capture - and thusly Pokédex completion - much easier.

Below are the Pokémon known to be encountered in the Friend Safari. If you have any additional Pokémon worth noting, please send 'em in through the Legalities section!


# SPECIES POKÉMON TYPE ABILITIES BASE STATS MAX STATS
HP Atk.Def.Sp.Atk.Sp.Def.Spd.HP Atk.Def.Sp.Atk.Sp.Def.Spd.
#002 Ivysaur Grass/Poison Overgrow, Chlorophyll 60 62 63 80 80 60 324 223 225 259 259 219
#005 Charmeleon Fire Blaze, Solar Power 58 64 58 80 65 80 320 227 215 259 229 259
#008 Wartortle Water Torrent, Rain Dish 59 63 80 65 80 58 322 225 259 229 259 218
#011 Metapod Bug Shed Skin 50 20 55 25 25 30 304 139 209 149 149 159
#012 Butterfree Bug/FlyingCompoundeyes, Tinted Lens 60 45 50 80 80 70 324 189 199 259 259 239
#014 Kakuna Bug/Poison Shed Skin 45 25 50 25 25 35 294 149 199 149 149 169
#015 Beedrill Bug/Poison Swarm, Sniper 65 80 40 45 80 75 334 259 179 189 259 249
#016 Pidgey Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 40 45 40 35 35 56 284 189 179 169 169 211
#017 Pidgeotto Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Tangled Feet, Big Pecks 63 60 55 50 50 71 330 219 209 199 199 241
#021 Spearow Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Sniper 40 60 30 31 31 70 284 219 159 161 161 239
#022 Fearow Normal/Flying Keen Eye, Sniper 65 90 65 61 61 100 334 279 229 221 221 299
#025 Pikachu Electric Static, Lightningrod 35 55 30 50 40 90 274 209 159 199 179 279
#027 Sandshrew Ground Sand Veil, Sand Rush 50 75 85 20 30 40 304 249 269 139 159 179
#028 Sandslash Ground Sand Veil, Sand Rush 75 100 110 45 55 65 354 299 319 189 209 229
#035 Clefairy Fairy Cute Charm, Magic Guard, Friend Guard 70 45 48 60 65 35 244 189 198 219 229 169
#037 Vulpix Fire Flash Fire, Drought 38 41 40 50 65 65 280 181 179 199 229 229
#038 Ninetales Fire Flash Fire, Drought 73 76 75 81 100 100 350 251 249 261 299 299
#039 Jigglypuff Normal/Fairy Cute Charm, Friend Guard, Competitive 115 45 20 45 25 20 434 189 139 189 149 139
#043 Oddish Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Run Away 45 50 55 75 65 30 294 199 209 249 229 159
#044 Gloom Grass/Poison Chlorophyll, Stench 60 65 70 85 75 40 324 229 239 269 249 179
#046 Paras Bug/Grass Dry Skin, Effect Spore, Damp 35 70 55 45 55 25 274 239 209 189 209 149
#049 Venomoth Bug/Poison Shield Dust, Tinted Lens, Wonder Skin 70 65 60 90 75 90 344 229 219 279 249 279
#056 Mankey Fighting Anger Point, Vital Spirit, Defiant 40 80 35 35 45 70 284 259 169 169 189 239
#058 Growlithe Fire Flash Fire, Intimidate, Justified 55 70 45 70 50 60 314 239 189 239 199 219
#061 Poliwhirl Water Damp, Water Absorb, Swift Swim 65 65 65 50 50 90 334 229 229 199 199 279
#063 Abra Psychic Inner Focus, Synchronize, Magic Guard 25 20 15 105 55 90 254 139 129 309 209 279
#064 Kadabra Psychic Inner Focus, Synchronize, Magic Guard 40 35 30 120 70 105 284 169 159 339 239 309
#067 Machoke Fighting Guts, No Guard, Steadfast 80 100 70 50 60 45 364 299 239 199 219 189
#082 Magneton Steel/Electric Magnet Pull, Sturdy, Analytic 50 60 95 120 70 70 304 219 289 339 239 239
#083 Farfetch'd Normal/Flying Inner Focus, Keen Eye, Defiant 52 65 55 58 62 60 308 229 209 215 223 219
#084 Doduo Normal/Flying Early Bird, Run Away, Tangled Feet 35 85 45 35 35 74 264 269 189 169 169 249
#085 Dodrio Normal/Flying Early Bird, Run Away, Tangled Feet 60 110 70 60 60 100 288 219 239 219 219 299
#087 Dewgong Water Hydration, Thick Fat, Ice Body 90 70 80 70 95 70 384 239 259 239 289 239
#089 Muk Poison Stench, Sticky Hold, Poison Touch 105 105 75 65 100 50 414 309 249 229 299 199
#091 Cloyster Water/Ice Shell Armor, Skill Link, Overcoat 50 95 180 85 45 70 304 289 459 269 189 239
#095 Onix Rock/Ground Rock Head, Sturdy, Weak Armor 35 45 160 30 45 70 274 189 419 159 189 239
#096 Drowzee Psychic Forewarn, Insomnia, Inner Focus 60 48 45 43 90 42 324 195 189 189 279 283
#097 Hypno Psychic Forewarn, Insomnia, Inner Focus 85 73 70 73 115 67 374 245 239 245 329 233
#098 Krabby Water Hyper Cutter, Shell Armor, Sheer Force 30 105 90 25 25 50 264 309 279 149 149 199
#099 Kingler Water Hyper Cutter, Shell Armor, Sheer Force 55 130 115 50 50 75 314 359 329 199 199 249
#101 Electrode Electric Soundproof, Static, Aftermath 60 50 70 80 80 140 324 199 239 259 259 379
#103 Exeggutor Grass/Psychic Chlorophyll, Harvest 95 95 85 125 65 55 394 289 269 349 229 209
#104 Cubone Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Battle Armor 50 50 95 40 50 35 304 199 289 179 199 169
#105 Marowak Ground Lightningrod, Rock Head, Battle Armor 60 80 110 50 80 45 324 259 319 199 259 189
#113 Chansey Normal Natural Cure, Serene Grace, Healer 250 5 5 35 105 50 704 109 109 169 309 199
#114 Tangela Grass Chlorophyll, Leaf Guard, Regenerator 65 55 115 100 40 60 334 209 329 299 179 219
#115 Kangaskhan Normal Early Bird, Scrappy, Inner Focus 105 95 80 40 80 90 414 289 148 179 228 259
#125 Electabuzz Electric Static, Vital Spirit 65 83 57 95 85 105 334 265 213 289 269 309
#126 Magmar Fire Flame Body, Vital Spirit 65 95 57 100 85 93 334 289 213 299 269 285
#127 Pinsir Bug Hyper Cutter, Mold Breaker, Moxie 65 125 100 55 70 85 334 349 299 209 239 269
#128 Tauros Normal Anger Point, Intimidate, Sheer Force 75 100 95 40 70 110 354 299 289 179 239 319
#130 Gyarados Water/Flying Intimidate, Moxie 95 125 79 60 100 81 394 349 257 219 299 261
#131 Lapras Water/Ice Shell Armor, Water Absorb, Hydration 130 85 80 85 95 60 464 269 259 269 289 219
#132 Ditto Normal Limber, Imposter 48 48 48 48 48 48 300 195 195 195 195 195
#133 Eevee Normal Adaptability, Run Away, Anticipation 55 55 50 45 65 55 314 209 199 189 229 209
#148 Dragonair Dragon Shed Skin, Marvel Scale 61 84 65 70 70 70 326 267 229 239 239 239
#163 Hoothoot Normal/Flying Insomnia, Keen Eye, Tinted Lens 60 30 30 36 56 50 324 159 159 171 211 199
#165 Ledyba Bug/Flying Early Bird, Swarm, Rattled 40 20 30 40 80 55 284 139 159 179 259 209
#166 Ledian Bug/Flying Early Bird, Swarm, Iron Fist 55 35 50 55 110 85 314 169 199 209 319 269
#168 Ariados Bug/Poison Insomnia, Swarm, Sniper 70 90 70 60 60 40 344 279 239 219 219 179
#175 Togepi Fairy Hustle, Serene Grace, Super Luck 35 20 65 40 65 20 274 139 229 179 229 139
#176 Togetic Fairy/Flying Hustle, Serene Grace, Super Luck 55 40 85 80 105 40 314 179 269 259 309 179
#178 Xatu Psychic/Flying Early Bird, Synchronize, Magic Bounce 65 75 70 95 70 95 334 249 239 289 239 289
#184 Azumarill Water/Fairy Huge Power, Thick Fat, Sap Sipper 100 50 80 50 80 50 404 199 259 199 259 199
#190 Aipom Normal Pickup, Run Away, Skill Link 55 70 55 40 55 85 314 239 209 179 209 269
#191 Sunkern Grass Chlorophyll, Solar Power, Early Bird 30 30 30 30 30 30 264 159 159 159 159 159
#193 Yanma Bug/Flying Compoundeyes, Speed Boost, Frisk 65 65 45 75 45 95 334 229 189 249 189 289
#194 Wooper Water/Ground Damp, Water Absorb, Unaware 55 45 45 25 25 15 314 189 189 149 149 129
#195 Quagsire Water/Ground Damp, Water Abosrb, Unaware 95 85 85 65 65 35 394 269 269 229 229 169
#198 Murkrow Dark/Flying Insomnia, Super Luck, Prankster 60 85 42 85 42 91 324 269 183 269 183 281
#200 Misdreavus Ghost Levitate 60 60 60 85 85 85 324 219 219 269 269 269
#202 Wobbuffet Psychic Shadow Tag, Telepathy 190 33 58 33 58 33 594 165 215 165 215 165
#203 Girafarig Normal/Psychic Early Bird, Inner Focus, Sap Sipper 70 80 65 90 65 85 344 259 229 279 229 269
#205 Forretress Bug/Steel Sturdy, Overcoat 75 90 140 60 60 40 354 279 379 219 219 179
#206 Dunsparce Normal Run Away, Serene Grace, Rattled 100 70 70 65 65 45 404 239 239 229 189 169
#207 Gligar Ground/Flying Hyper Cutter, Sand Veil, Immunity 65 75 105 35 65 85 334 249 309 169 229 269
#209 Snubbull Fairy Intimidate, Run Away, Rattled 60 80 50 40 40 30 324 259 199 179 179 159
#213 Shuckle Bug/Rock Gluttony, Sturdy, Contrary 20 10 230 10 230 5 244 119 559 119 559 109
#214 Heracross Bug/Fighting Guts, Swarm, Moxie 80 125 75 40 95 85 264 249 249 179 289 269
#215 Sneasel Ice/Dark Inner Focus, Keen Eye, Pickpocket 55 95 55 35 75 115 314 289 209 169 249 329
#216 Teddiursa Normal Pickup, Quick Feet, Honey Gather 60 80 50 50 50 40 324 259 199 199 199 179
#218 Slugma Fire Flame Body, Magma Armor, Weak Armor 40 40 40 70 40 20 284 179 179 239 179 139
#219 Magcargo Fire/Rock Flame Body, Magma Armor, Weak Armor 50 50 120 80 80 30 304 199 339 259 259 159
#221 Piloswine Ice/Ground Oblivious, Snow Cloak, Thick Fat 100 100 80 60 60 50 404 299 259 219 219 199
#222 Corsola Water/Rock Hustle, Natural Cure, Regenerator 55 55 85 65 85 35 314 209 269 229 269 169
#227 Skarmory Steel/Flying Keen Eye, Sturdy, Weak Armor 65 80 140 40 70 70 334 259 379 179 239 239
#231 Phanpy Ground Pickup, Sand Veil 90 60 60 40 40 40 384 219 219 179 179 179
#235 Smeargle Normal Own Tempo, Technician, Moody 55 20 35 20 45 75 314 139 169 139 189 249
#236 Tyrogue Fighting Guts, Steadfast, Vital Spirit 35 35 35 35 35 35 274 169 169 169 169 169
#247 Pupitar Rock/Ground Shed Skin 70 84 70 65 70 51 344 267 239 229 239 201
#262 Mightyena Dark Intimidate, Quick Feet, Moxie 70 90 70 60 60 70 344 279 239 219 219 239
#264 Linoone Normal Gluttony, Pickup, Quick Feet 78 70 61 50 61 100 360 239 221 199 221 299
#267 Beautifly Bug/Flying Swarm, Rivalry 60 70 50 90 50 65 324 239 199 279 199 229
#269 Dustox Bug/Poison Shield Dust, Compoundeyes 60 50 70 50 90 65 324 199 239 199 279 229
#274 Nuzleaf Grass/Dark Chlorophyll, Early Bird, Pickpocket 70 70 40 60 40 60 344 239 179 219 179 219
#281 Kirlia Psychic/Fairy